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10:09
Women's Foot Health - Podiatrist, foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses the Women’s Foot Health and Foot Problems http://www.footcare.net The best shoe for women's feet is a walking shoe with laces (not a slip-on), a composition sole, and a relatively wider heel with a rigid and padded heel counter, no more than three-quarters of an inch in height. Some women inflict punishment on their feet from improper footwear that can bring about unnecessary foot problems. Some of the problems result from high-heeled shoes (generally defined as pumps with heels of more than two inches). A study conducted by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society found that: • Nine out of 10 women wear shoes that are too small for their feet. • Eight out of 10 women say their shoes are painful. • More than 7 out of 10 women have developed a bunion, hammertoe, or other painful foot deformity. • Women are nine times more likely to develop a foot problem because of improper fitting shoes than a man. • Nine out of 10 women's foot deformities can be attributed to tight shoes. High-heeled, pointed-toe shoes can cause numerous orthopedic problems, leading to discomfort or injury to the toes, ankles, knees, calves, and back. Many high-heeled-shoes also have a pointed, narrow toe box that crowds the toes and forces them into an unnatural triangular shape. These shoes distribute the body's weight unevenly, placing excess stress on the ball of the foot and on the forefoot. This uneven distribution of weight, coupled with the narrow toe box characteristic of most high heels, can lead to discomfort, bunions, hammertoes, and other deformities. The height of the heel makes a dramatic difference in the pressure that occurs on the bottom of the foot. As heel height increases, the pressure under the ball of the foot may double, placing greater pressure on the forefoot as it is forced into the pointed toe box. To relieve the abusive effects of high heels, women should limit the amount of time they wear them and alternate these shoes with good quality sneakers or flats for part of the day. Look for comfortable and attractive walking pumps for work and social activities, that blend fashion appeal with athletic shoe-derived construction, reinforced heels, and wider toe room for greater comfort. Low-heeled shoes (one inch or lower) with a wide toe box are the ideal choice for women. An ample toe box that can accommodate the front part of the foot is as important as the heel in determining fit. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net Visit our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fk5rUiJiAHc
19 Mar 2012
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11:31
Children's Foot Health - Podiatrist, foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses children’s foot health and foot problems. http://www.footcare.net Choosing shoes for your children can play a critical role in their musculoskeletal development, including their posture. In general, infants just learning to walk do not need shoes. Infants may go barefooted indoors, or wear only a pair of socks. This helps the foot grow normally and develop its muscles and strength as well as encourages the grasping ability of toes. Once children are ready to walk as toddlers, their need for properly-fitted shoes is important. In general, a soft, pliable, roomy shoe, such as a sneaker, is ideal for all children. The toe box should provide enough space for growth and should be wide enough to allow the toes to wiggle. A finger's breadth of extra length will usually allow for about three to six months' worth of growth, though this can vary depending on your child's age and rate of growth. Because high-top shoes tie above the ankle, they are recommended for younger children who may have trouble keeping their shoes on. Contrary to common belief, however, high-top shoes offer no advantages in terms of foot or ankle support over their low-cut counterparts. Here are some tips when purchasing shoes for children: • Both feet should be measured every time you shop for new shoes since those little feet are growing. If, as is common, the feet are two different sizes, shoes should be fitted to the larger foot. • The child's foot should be sized while he or she is standing up with full weight-bearing. • There should be about one-half inch of space (or a thumb's width) between the tip of the toes and the end of the shoe. The child should be able to comfortably wiggle his or her toes in the shoe. • Have the child walk around the store for more than just a few minutes wearing the shoe with a normal sock. Ask the child if he or she feels any pressure spots in the shoe. Look for signs of irritation on the foot after the shoe is tested. • Put your hand inside the shoe and feel around for any staples or irregularities in the glue that could cause irritation. Examine where the inside stitching hits the foot. • Examine the shoe itself. It should have a firm heel counter (stiff material on either side of the heel), adequate cushioning of the insole, and a built-in arch. It should be flexible enough to bend where the foot bends at the ball of the foot, not in the middle of the shoe. • Never try to force your child's feet to fit a pair of shoes. • Shoes should not slip off at the heels. Children who have a tendency to sprain their ankles will do better with high-top shoes or boots. Children who frequently remove shoes from their feet may be signaling some discomfort. Check your child's feet periodically for signs of too-tight shoes, such as redness, calluses or blisters, which will help you know when they've outgrown their shoes. Remember that the primary purpose of shoes is to prevent injury. Shoes seldom correct children's foot deformities or change a foot's growth pattern. Casting, bracing, or surgery may be needed if a serious deformity is present. If you notice a problem, please contact our office to have your child's feet examined. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net Visit our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vW9mrEEOKQ
20 Mar 2012
140
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11:24
Preventing Sports Injuries - Podiatrist, foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for sports injuries. http://www.footcare.net Athletic footwear should be fitted to hold the foot in the position that's most natural to the movement involved. Athletic shoes protect your feet from stresses encountered in a given sport and to give the player more traction. The differences in design and variations in material, weight, lacing characteristics, and other factors among athletic shoes are meant to protect the areas of the feet that encounter the most stress. Well-fitted athletic shoes need to be comfortable, yet well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. A good fit will mitigate blisters and other skin irritations. Sports-specific athletic shoes are a good investment for serious athletes, though perhaps a less critical consideration for non-athletes. Don't wear any sport or other shoes beyond their useful life. A running shoe is built to take impact, while a tennis shoe is made to give relatively more support, and permit sudden stops and turns. Cross training shoes are fine for a general athletic shoe, such as for physical education classes or health club exercising, such as on stair machines and weight-lifting because they provide more lateral support and less flexibility than running shoes. They also tend to be heavier than running shoes, but most people don't need light, flexible shoes for cross-training. If a child is involved more heavily in any single sport, he or she should wear shoes specifically designed for that sport. Our practice recommends sturdy, properly fitted athletic shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible (but only at the ball of the foot), cushioning, arch supports, and room for your toes. Try a well-cushioned sock for reinforcement, preferably one with acrylic fiber content so that some perspiration moisture is wicked away. Athletic shoes need to be replaced after one year, whether or not they are worn, and after a certain amount of repetitive load is placed on them and wears them down. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear. Athletic shoes should also be replaced if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net Visit our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnjDcRyy_50
20 Mar 2012
169
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9:02
Foot Problems & Walking Shoes - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for sports injuries. http://www.footcare.net About 67 million adults in this country have discovered that walking is one of the most fun, natural, and inexpensive ways of keeping your health—and your feet—in top shape. Walking can be enjoyed almost anywhere, any time, and year around. It's also a good way to get exercise, particularly for people who are out-of-shape. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, exercise offers a host of benefits. Walking helps control weight, blood sugar, and cholesterol levels. A brisk walk can burn up to 100 calories per mile or 300 calories per hour. Walking also improves cardiovascular fitness. As an aerobic exercise, walking gets the heart beating faster to transport oxygen-rich blood from the lungs to the muscles. The heart and lungs grow more efficient with a regular walking regimen, reducing blood pressure and the resting heart rate. Walking is also a central element of medical rehabilitation for a wide array of health problems. For example, recovery from a heart attack can be facilitated by a regular walking regimen. Additionally, walking creates an overall feeling of well-being, and can relieve depression, anxiety, and stress by producing endorphins, the body's natural tranquilizer. A brisk walk will relax you and also stimulate your thinking. To gain the most health benefit from walking, it is important to pay attention to your feet. Shoes that don't fit properly or provide adequate support, lack of stretching, and improper gait can lead to foot injuries or pain. The most common foot problems are blisters, corns, calluses, and plantar fasciitis. Walking Shoes The only equipment you need to enjoy walking for fitness is a good pair of shoes. But before you can shop for the best shoe for your foot, you need to identify the natural inclination of your foot and gait. There are three basic foot types: • Pronators are people with relatively flat feet, caused by low arches, which generally leads to overpronation, or a gait in which the ankle rolls inward excessively. People with this foot type need motion control shoes that offer support for mid-foot. Motion-control shoes are more rigid and built on a straight last. These are generally board-lasted shoes, which have a piece of cardboard running the length of the shoe for greater stability. Look for sturdy uppers for added stability and avoid shoes with a lot of cushioning or highly curved toes. Also look for a reinforced heel counter to maintain foot support and stability. • Supinators are people with high arches, which can lead to underpronation that places too much weight on the outsides of the feet. People with this foot type need stability shoes designed for extra shock absorption and often having a curved or semi-curved last. A slip-lasted shoe is also recommended, because the sewn seam runs the length of the shoe giving it greater flexibility. Also look for shoes that are reinforced around the ankle and heel to stabilize the foot and extra cushioning under the ball of the foot. • People with normal feet can wear any type of walking shoe, although a curved last is generally preferred. When you walk, the natural motion of your foot rolls gradually from the heel to the toe, with your foot bending at the ball on each step. That's why it is important for walking shoes to have enough flexibility in just the right places. A good walking shoe should give a little when you twist it and bend at the ball of the foot. When you put the shoe on a flat surface and push on the toe the heel should come up off the surface. If it does, the shoe has the curvature you need to conform to your movement during walking. Make sure the heel is low and not too wide. A slight undercut in the heel will help your foot begin its roll from the heel through the step. Here are some other important tips for buying a good pair of walking shoes: • Shop at the end of the day when your feet are slightly swollen to get a good fit. • Try on shoes with the socks you will wear when walking. If you use an orthotic, bring that to the store when you try on shoes as well. • Have your feet measured standing up and fit your shoes to the larger of your two feet. • Be sure there is enough room in the toe box for your toes to wiggle and about a half inch between your toes and the end of the shoe. • Take time when shopping to try on different brands and walk around the store in each pair. Be sure to walk on a hard surface, not just on carpeting. Let your foot be the guide to the fit, not the shoe size or style. • Look for lightweight, breathable materials for greater comfort. • Run your hand all over and inside the shoes to feel for any seams or catches that might irritate your foot. • Choose shoes that lace for better foot stability and control. • Make sure your heel fits snugly and does not tend toward slipping out of the shoe. • Wear your walking shoes only for walking to extend their life. Consider buying two pairs and rotating your wear to give each pair time to breath between walks. • Replace walking shoes after every 300 to 600 miles, depending on how hard you are on your shoes. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net Visit our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nWYEoQJjFY
20 Mar 2012
196
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3:18
Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses Minimal Incision Outpatient Foot Surgery. http://www.footcare.net Surgery on the foot, ankle, or lower leg is usually performed by podiatric surgeons and orthopedic surgeons specializing in the foot and ankle. Foot and ankle surgeries address a wide variety of foot problems, including: • Sprains and fractures. • Arthritis and joint disease. • Benign and malignant tumors. • Birth deformities. • Bunions. • Calluses and warts. • Corns and hammertoes. • Flatfeet. • Heel or toe spurs. • Neuromas (nerve tumors). Many foot and ankle surgeries today can be performed in the doctor's office or a surgical center on an outpatient basis. They frequently can be performed using local anesthesia, in some cases combined with sedation. Most foot surgeries require a period of immobilization after the procedures with protective devices, such as a bandages, splints, surgical shoes, casts, or open sandals. Limited weight bearing, elevating and icing the foot, and keeping the area dry are commonly required for the first two weeks following surgery until sutures are removed. Most surgeons will encourage post-operative exercise of the foot and legs to speed recovery. In addition, many patients need additional therapy or treatments after surgery in order to aid in the healing and recovery process. These may include physiotherapy, orthotic devices, and special footwear. After sufficient healing time, which varies from procedure to procedure, most patients can resume wearing their usual footwear. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net
20 Mar 2012
176
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8:33
Laser Treatment Toenail Fungus - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses laser therapy for Fungal Toenails On August 26 2010 our Toronto podiatry office introduced in Canada, laser treatment for toenail fungus or onychomycosis using a 1320 nm YAG laser . A preliminary study performed in Roseville California indicates that up to 75-80% of patients with mild to moderate onychomycosis or fungal toenails will experience a significant improvement following treatment. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8mrRgtRxaU
20 Mar 2012
171
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2:27
Laser Therapy Foot Pain - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses laser therapy for foot pain management. http://www.footcare.net Laser therapy is use for pain management. The effects of Laser Treatment include but not limited to improved healing time, pain reduction, increased circulation, decreased swelling and vasodilation. Laser therapy has been widely utilized in Europe by physical therapists, nurses, and doctors as far back as the 1970s. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpV0xBZ4H-8
20 Mar 2012
94
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1:40
Shoes and Preventing Foot Problems - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses How to Choose Shoes and Preventing Foot Problems http://www.footcare.net Examining old shoes before buying new ones can help you evaluate your wear patterns and buy new shoes with a better fit and style that compensates for the stresses you place on shoes. What are your shoes trying to tell you? Here is a translation of basic wear patterns: • A bulge and wear to the side of the big toe means too-narrow fit or you have a bunion. • Outer sole wear means you turn your foot out. Orthotics may help. • Toe-shaped ridges on the upper means your shoes are too small or you have hammertoes. • Wear on the ball of the foot means your heel tendons may be too tight. • Wear on the inner sole means you pronate or turn your foot inward. Inner liners or orthotics may help. • Wear on the upper, above the toes means the front of your shoe is too low. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmc-TjV0rCU
21 Mar 2012
166
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3:06
Bunion and Hammertoe Surgery - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy). http://www.footcare.net There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6oDwzWqzq4
21 Mar 2012
151
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0:59
Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy) - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy). Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQ5BZhyQleQ
21 Mar 2012
170
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4:33
What Causes Heel Pain? - Toronto, ON - Podiatrist, foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis). What causes heel pain? One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome.Other causes include gout, arthritis, broken heel bone, infection, foreign bodies (such as stepping on a needle). Your podiatrist can determine the exact cause of your heel pain. What is plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome? Plantar fasciitis is due to a tight tendon located under the arch and attached to the bottom of the heel. It has become strained and inflamed, often due to a lack of proper support, or due to an injury, or overuse. Over time, the tendon may begin to pull away from its attachment at the heel and a bone spur develops. Generally, the problem is not due to the heel spur, it is due to the inflamed tendon. How do I know if I have plantar fasciitis? Usually, you will experience pain at the bottom of the heel, particularly when getting out of bed in the morning or when starting to walk following a period of rest. It tends to feel better after a moderate amount of walking. It may not hurt during a workout but usually hurts more the next day following the workout. What can I do at home to relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis? Applying ice to the tender area for short periods may help. Also, try gentle calf stretches. Aspirin may relieve the inflammation. Elevating the heel by putting a soft pad in the shoe under your sore heel may help. Women may feel better in a shoe with a higher heel. What if my heel still hurts? It's time to see a podiatrist. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net
21 Mar 2012
119
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0:31
Minimal Invasive Bunion Surgery - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy). http://www.footcare.net There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net You Tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me0hWXZvOuE
21 Mar 2012
146
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6:57
Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery - foot Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, Foot Specialist, Toronto, ON Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal discusses Minimal Incision Outpatient Foot Surgery. Visit our website: http://www.footcare.net YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDxEhWJpv54 Surgery on the foot, ankle, or lower leg is usually performed by podiatric surgeons and orthopedic surgeons specializing in the foot and ankle. Foot and ankle surgeries address a wide variety of foot problems, including: • Sprains and fractures. • Arthritis and joint disease. • Benign and malignant tumors. • Birth deformities. • Bunions. • Calluses and warts. • Corns and hammertoes. • Flatfeet. • Heel or toe spurs. • Neuromas (nerve tumors).
21 Mar 2012
144
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4:49
On this week's episode of Couch, the cast plays Fruit Ninja on the Kinect! Credits: Producer: Christine Motsinger Assistant Producer: Thomas Shulenburg Production Manager: Tyler Thomas Talent: Tiffany Tresemer, Chaz O'Neil, Nick Borchardt, Lucas Lichte Director: Hannah Hein Editors: Dan Sheldon Audio: Jason McKinney Executive Producer: Spencer Striker
22 Mar 2012
197
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5:57
This week, the cast of Couch interviews Phil Larson of Halfbrick Games - the guys who made Fruit Ninja! Credits: Producer: Christine Motsinger Assistant Producer: Thomas Shulenburg Production Manager: Tyler Thomas Talent: Tiffany Tresemer, Chaz O'Neil, Nick Borchardt, Lucas Lichte Director: Hannah Hein Editors: Dan Sheldon Audio: Jason McKinney Executive Producer: Spencer Striker
22 Mar 2012
187
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2:02
Twins Movie Trailer - watch all clips http://j.mp/xtpcOj click to subscribe http://j.mp/sNDUs5 A physically perfect, yet innocent man (Arnold Schwarzenegger) goes in search of his twin brother(Danny Devito), a short, small-time crook. TM & © Universal (2012) Cast: David Caruso, Danny DeVito, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Heather Graham, Kelly Preston Director: Ivan Reitman MOVIECLIPS YouTube Channel: http://j.mp/vqieFG Join our Facebook page: http://j.mp/tb8OMH Follow us on Twitter: http://j.mp/rZzGsm Buy Movie: http://amzn.to/uhyHaa Producer: Michael C. Gross, Sheldon Kahn, Joe Medjuck, Ivan Reitman, Gordon A. Webb Screenwriter: William Davies, William Osborne, Timothy Harris, Herschel Weingrod Film Description: The central "gimmick" of the comedy-adventure Twins is established early on. Unbeknownst to one another, king-sized Arnold Schwarzenegger and gnomeish Danny De Vito are twin brothers. Even better: Schwarzenegger is a mild-mannered, bookish type, while De Vito is a vitriolic troublemaker. The film takes satiric jabs at the notion of "perfect" genetics, and makes several pointed comments concerning the dangers of youthful pre-conditioning by insensitive parents. twins,"twins trailer","twins talking to each other","twins dancing","arnold schwarzenegger","danny devito","heather graham","david caruso","kelly preston","baby videos","phone videos","suit videos","sunglasses videos",comedy,"ivan reitman","joe medjuck","gordon a webb","sheldon kahn","michael c gross","brotherhood videos","family videos","friendship videos","elevator videos","gas station videos","movie clips",movieclipsdotcom,#AMG:V++++51349,/m/025r7k,/m/0q9kd,/m/0tc7,/m/016vg8,/m/01pqy_
1 Apr 2012
190
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