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When a person has experienced known or probable exposure to a high dose of radiation from an accident or attack, medical personnel take a number of steps to determine the absorbed radiation dose. This information is essential for determining how severe the illness is likely to be, which treatments to use and whether a person is likely to survive. Information important for determining an absorbed dose includes: Known exposure. Details about distance from the source of radiation and duration of exposure can help provide a rough estimate of the severity of radiation sickness. Vomiting and other symptoms. The time between radiation exposure and the onset of vomiting is a fairly accurate screening tool to estimate absorbed radiation dose. The shorter the time before the onset of this sign, the higher the dose. The severity and timing of other signs and symptoms also may help medical personnel determine the absorbed dose. Blood tests. Frequent blood tests over several days enable medical personnel to look for drops in disease-fighting white blood cells and abnormal changes in the DNA of blood cells. These factors indicate the degree of bone marrow damage, which is determined by the level of an absorbed dose. Dosimeter. A device called a dosimeter can measure the absorbed dose of radiation but only if it was exposed to the same radiation event as the affected person. Survey meter. A device such as a Geiger counter can be used to survey people to determine the body location of radioactive particles. Type of radiation. A part of the larger emergency response to a radioactive accident or attack would include identifying the type of radiation exposure. This information would guide some decisions for treating people with radiation sickness.
26 Sep 2017
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11 Oct 2017
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0:40
Are you sick of running everywhere in search of someone to help you with electrical service upgrades? If yes, then visit dynamic-integration right away!
25 Sep 2017
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How to Deal With Stage 3 Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer survival by stage It is best to treat colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, in its early stages. There are 5 stages of colon cancer, ranging from 0 to 4. Stage 3, Dukes C colon cancer, is one of the more advanced stages. In it, tumors have spread beyond the colon to the lymph nodes. Stage 3 is divided into 3 subgroups. These subgroups range from least to most advanced with a survival rate ranging from 44 to 83 percent. Your doctor and cancer team will explain what this stage means, answer questions, provide treatment options and help you determine which plan will work best for you. 1 Deal with stage 3 colon cancer in steps. Try not to get ahead of yourself by looking at the entire picture. 2 Admit that you are sick. This is the first step in accepting and coping with a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. It takes time to process this information and the new emotions you're feeling. You may become a little overwhelmed, frightened or anxious. These are normal feelings, so allow yourself a little time.
26 Sep 2017
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1:44
Do you have hepatitis C? Some patients of hepatitis C don’t have any symptoms and their day-to-day activities don’t get effected by the disease. On the other hand, some people feel sick, depressed or tired. Given are some home hepatitis C treatments for this disease that may help you feel better.
26 Sep 2017
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15:28
Humans have twice as much lymph fluid in the body as blood. Unlike the circulatory system, the lymphatic system does not have a pump. In order to move, lymph relies on blood pressure and the relaxation and the contraction of the muscles and joints. Your lymphatic system can easily become stagnant, especially when it becomes overwhelmed with toxic debris. The combination of a toxic lifestyle and lethargy is a recipe for chronic disease. All things in nature have a natural progression. When this progression is inhibited, health deteriorates. Think of a river. A healthy river runs clean and clear compared to stagnant water. Imagine them clogged and the resulting backup. Picture an engine and car oil, and you can equate our lymphatic system to an oil filter. Imagine how sluggish and constrictive the engine would be if the oil wasn’t constantly filtered. Sluggish lymph fluid is a breeding ground for infection. Stagnant lymph interferes with every system of the body. Because lymph cleanses nearly every cell in the body, symptoms of chronic lymph blockage are diverse. While most people prefer to identify one specific cause of a disease, there are rarely fewer than three and can often be hundreds. The point is, if the body is unhealthy, the lymph is unhealthy, too. If the body is sick, the lymph is sick, too. Symptoms of lymphatic congestion include: Rings get tight on fingers Skin is puffy, showing edema Soreness, stiffness, achiness in the mornings Arthritis Lethargic, drained, sluggishness Bloating, water retention Itchy skin Bad skin (dryness, acne, premature aging, etc.) Breast swelling or soreness with hormonal cycles Brain fog Cold hands and feet Chronic headaches and/or migraines Cellulite Cancer Diabetes Chronic inflammation
28 Sep 2017
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4:22
How to Clean a medications to hold before cardiac cath|cardiac Catheterization Site Cardiac catheterization is a common medical procedure which enables your doctor to examine your heart. A small tube is inserted through a blood vessel in your leg or arm and moved through your body until it reaches your heart. The catheter may be used to check the blood pressure in your heart, put contrast dye into your heart to facilitate taking X-rays, take blood samples, biopsy your heart, or check for structural problems with the chambers or valves. Because it is an invasive procedure, minimizing infection risk before and after the procedure is very important 1 Avoid people who are sick. If you are sick, even with a minor illness like a cold or flu, this burdens your immune system and makes it easier for you to develop complications. If you wake up the morning of your procedure with a fever, cough, drippy nose, or any other symptoms, notify your doctor immediately.[12] Wash your hands after you shake hands with people and before you eat. This will reduce the likelihood that you expose yourself to pathogens carried by others. Don’t go near, hug, or shake hands with people who have the flu or a cold. Avoid being in small confined spaces with lots of people. These are excellent opportunities for pathogen exchange. This may mean not taking public transportation such as the bus or subway. 2 Boost your immune system by managing stress. Stress causes hormonal and physiological changes in your body which, over time, can weaken your immune system. By easing stress and anxiety before the procedure, you can help ensure that your immune system will remain strong. You can reduce stress by: Learning as much as possible about your procedure. Your doctor and the hospital can provide you with information. Many hospitals even have booklets of information that they provide and make freely available online. Ask your doctor or hospital if such information is available. If so, it will help you under
28 Sep 2017
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25:03
Pneumonia is a lung infection that can make you very sick. You may cough, run a fever, and have a hard time breathing. For most people, pneumonia can be treated at home. It often clears up in 2 to 3 weeks. But older adults, babies, and people with other diseases can become very ill. They may need to be in the hospital. You can get pneumonia in your daily life, such as at school or work. This is called community-associated pneumonia. You can also get it when you are in a hospital or nursing home. This is called healthcare-associated pneumonia. It may be more severe because you already are ill. This topic focuses on pneumonia you get in your daily life. Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs. It can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Bacterial pneumonia is the most common type in adults. Pneumonia causes inflammation in the air sacs in your lungs, which are called alveoli. The alveoli fill with fluid or pus, making it difficult to breathe. Read on to learn more about pneumonia and how to treat it. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs with a range of possible causes. It can be a serious and life-threatening disease. It normally starts with a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection. The lungs become inflamed, and the tiny air sacs, or alveoli, inside the lungs fill up with fluid. Pneumonia can occur in young and healthy people, but it is most dangerous for older adults, infants, people with other diseases, and those with impaired immune systems.
4 Oct 2017
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5:51
How to Cure Tuberculosis| Read a Tuberculosis Skin Test|Recognizing Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection of the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection starts in the lungs and can spread to other parts of the body such as the spine or brain. It is transmitted through airborne droplets that the sick person releases when he sneezes, coughs, speaks, or laughs. If you think you might have it is important to see a doctor right away and get medications to treat it. If you are being treated for TB, it is important to take the entire course of your medications even after you feel well. This prevents drug-resistant strains from developing.
12 Oct 2017
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4:40
How to Cure Tuberculosis|Treating Your Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Skin Test Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection of the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection starts in the lungs and can spread to other parts of the body such as the spine or brain. It is transmitted through airborne droplets that the sick person releases when he sneezes, coughs, speaks, or laughs. If you think you might have it is important to see a doctor right away and get medications 1 Take medications. Most tuberculosis treatments require taking medications for six to nine months. Which medications you are prescribed will depend on which strain of TB you have. TB medications can damage your liver, so tell your doctor if you have any liver problems. Common medications include:[9][10] Isoniazid. This medication can cause nerve damage. Tell your doctor if your hands or feet feel numb or tingle. You will also be given vitamin B6 to lessen the risk. Rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane). This medication can interfere with some types of birth control, including the combined contraceptive pill. If you are given this medication, use condoms as a backup method of birth control.
12 Oct 2017
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0:59
Sue! Don't pretent to be sick...
18 Sep 2006
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5:22
Armand never gets sick of soy.
8 Jan 2007
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