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How to Self Screen for Colon Cancer|alternatives to colonoscopy for colon cancer screening Colon cancer is the third most common cancer. However, there are excellent screening tests available and, when caught early, colon cancer is able to be treated and cured in 90% of all cases.[1] This is why following through with the recommended screening is so important. See your family doctor to learn how to self-screen for colon cancer via the at-home stool test, which is recommended every one to two years for people over the age of 50. Though colon screenings performed by trained doctors are always best, an at-home test is better than nothing and could point out issues that you'll need to address. 1 Evaluate your level of risk for colon cancer.[2] Everyone is eligible for colon cancer screening beginning at the age of 50; however, if you have a family history of colon cancer, or a personal history of inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, both of which increase your risk of developing colon cancer) you may be eligible to begin screening earlier. Don't wait to discuss this with your doctor — even if you are still young, it is important to notify your doctor if you have any risk factors. See your doctor at age 50 to begin self-screening, and earlier if you believe you have additional risk factors (in which case your doctor will let you know at what age you are eligible to begin). 2 Obtain the testing package.[3] The first thing you will need to do in order to self-screen for colon cancer is to obtain the at-home stool testing package. You will need to visit your family doctor to obtain this, and she will explain the procedure to you during this visit as well. One stool test is called the Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). This looks for blood in your stool that is not visible to the naked eye. It is the most commonly used self-screening test for colon cancer.[4] Another stool test option is called the Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT). This i
26 Sep 2017
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This guy just had to simply place the big jar upon a stool or table, but he failed at that too as he slipped and spilled all the water out on himself.
18 Oct 2017
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How to Screen for Colon Cancer|alternatives to colonoscopy for colon cancer screening Colon cancer is the third most common cancer. The average person has a 4.5% chance of developing it in their lifetime.[1] This is why screening tests are so important, and fortunately, for colon cancer, the screening tests are very effective. With screening, precancerous and/or cancerous lesions can be detected as early as possible, giving you the best chance of removing the lesions before they become problematic or life-threatening 1 Begin screening at the age of 50.[3] For the general population (those who have not been designated to be at a heightened risk of colon cancer), screening is recommended to commence at the age of 50. The options to consider are a stool test (recommended once every one to two years), a colonoscopy (a more invasive test that is recommended every 10 years), or a sigmoidoscopy or CT colonography (both of which are recommended every five years. The one you choose for your own personal screening will depend upon your preference. 2 Opt for a stool test.[4] Both blood and/or DNA can be tested for in your stool, and a positive test indicates suspicion that you may have colon cancer. It does not indicate that you have colon cancer - it simply means that you are at a heightened risk and should undergo more extensive medical evaluation. The advantage of stool testing is that it is an easy and non-invasive test. You can collect the stool sample(s) at home (depending upon how many are requested by your doctor) and simply send them into the lab for formal evaluation.
26 Sep 2017
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How to Stage advanced colon cancer treatment |stage 111 colon cancer Colon and rectal cancers involve the lower part of the digestive system (the large intestine/colon and the rectum). It is a common disease (the third most common form of cancer),with 132,700 new diagnoses and 49,000 deaths in the United States each year. [1] Once diagnosed, each patient's cancer is assigned a stage (I through IV) which indicates the extent and severity of the disease. The key to obtaining effective treatment for any cancer is proper staging. 1 Become aware of how colon cancer is diagnosed. For some people, they show no symptoms at all and the diagnosis is discovered from a screening test (such as the stool test); this is followed up by a colonoscopy (where the doctor inserts a tube through your rectum to look at your colon, at which point he or she will be able to see any cancer that may be present). For other people, colon cancer is diagnosed after presenting
26 Sep 2017
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How to Reduce the Risk of Colon Cancer|colorectal cancer information Colon (or colorectal) cancer is among the top five most frequent types of cancer in both women and men worldwide. About half the people who have colon cancer die from it. However, over 50 percent of colon cancer cases can be avoided by following basic prevention methods. There are many ways to reduce your risk of contracting colon cancer, including regular screening and consultations, quitting smoking, eating well-balanced diet, and getting regular physical activity. 1 Get a colonoscopy. Colonoscopy screenings typically begin when you turn 50 if you have no other colon cancer risk factors, such as relatives who have had colon cancer. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease, your physician may advise you to have a colonoscopy before your 50th birthday.[2] Prepare for your colonoscopy screening. The colonoscopy allows doctors to remove any polyps that may be forming in your colon. Polyps take 10 to 15 years to grow and may turn into colorectal cancer. You may be required to fast and go through a colon cleansing. Getting a colonoscopy performed will take less than one day. 2 Get a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). FOBTs are tests that look for hidden blood in the stool which can be signs of polyp growth or cancer. FOBTs are much less invasive than colonoscopy and can be done once a year.[3] You may often have the option of sampling your stool at home and mailing it, in a container provided to you by your doctor, to a lab to be medically tested.
26 Sep 2017
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Romney: The Three Legged Stool
28 Jul 2007
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Governor Romney On The Republican Three-Legged Stool
7 Aug 2007
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FOX: Gov. Romney On The 3 Legged Stool
7 Aug 2007
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How to Draw an Impossible Chair/Stool.
1 May 2008
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Here is my bar stool racer I built in early 2007. Here I am draggin the back section of the frame.
17 Jul 2008
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2009 Martin City, Montana Cabin Fever Days, Bar Stool Races. Winter fun near Glacier National Park and Hungry Horse, Montana. Fun in the snow.
18 Feb 2009
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Bar Stool Races Martin City, Montana Cabin Fever Days, 2009 . Winter fun near Glacier National Park and Hungry Horse, Montana. Fun in the snow.
8 Jun 2009
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Bar Stool Races Martin City, Montana during Cabin Fever Days, 2009. Winter fun near Glacier National Park and Hungry Horse, Montana. Fun in the snow.
12 Jan 2010
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Buy cheap Discounted Bar Stools online today, new and used bar stools are available for sale at the most absolutely rock bottom pricing ever, just for you! We know exactly what you want and need!
17 Mar 2009
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