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Ingrown Toenails - Podiatrist Toronto, ON Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails *******www.footcare**** Painless Toenail Surgery: It is possible to get permanent relief from ingrown toenails in my Toronto podiatry office with a minor surgical procedure. The procedure is performed painlessly under local anesthetic - only your toe is frozen. Just the painful ingowing side of the nail is removed. The part of the root that is causing the problem is treated with the carbon dioxide laseer and a special chemical. a small bandage is put on your toe. You can walk immediately. You then apply an ointment and a bandaid to the toe at home. I will see you a few days later in my office to make sure your toe is healing properly. Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.footcare****
26 Oct 2011
492
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3:06
Bunion and Hammertoe Surgery - Toronto Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Bunions and Hammertoes. *******www.footcare**** Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Bunion surgeries fall into two major categories: • Head procedures that treat the big toe joint. In a head procedure bunionectomy, the bone is cut just behind the joint, moved into its proper position, and fixed in place with a screw or pin. Head procedures are often used for patients who cannot be immobilized for long periods of time. • Base procedures concentrate on the bone near or behind the big toe joint. Different types of base procedures are conducted depending on the nature of the deformity. These range from cutting a wedge out of the bone and splitting it so that it can be moved into its proper position; making a semi-circular cut and rotating the bone into its correct position; or fusing the joint. Ligaments inside and outside the toe may also be treated during a base procedure. There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. What To Expect Most bunions surgeries today are performed on an outpatient basis at a surgical center or hospital. Set aside the entire day for the surgery, although you may only be at the facility for a half day. Prior to the surgery, patients will need to make some preparatory arrangements. These include: • Seeing your Primary Care Physician (PCP) to make sure any other health conditions are stabilized prior to surgery and to document your complete medical history, which can then be given to the foot surgeon. • Arranging your schedule to make sure you don't need to take any long trips for at least two to three weeks following the surgery. • Lining up another person to drive you home and stay with you for the first 24 hours after the surgery. • Stopping the use of any anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen, for five to seven days before the surgery. The night before the surgery, you will not be able to eat or drink anything after midnight. You should also wash your foot the night before and morning of the procedure to help reduce surrounding bacteria and prevent infection. Bunion surgery is usually performed with a local anesthetic and is administered by an anesthesiologist. This may be combined with sedation medication to put you into twilight so that you are fully relaxed. After the surgery, patients are often given a long-acting anesthetic and pain medication, which is why someone else must drive the patient home. The type of procedure you have will determine the degree to which you can put weight on the foot immediately after the surgery. Some patients, particularly those having base procedures, may have to use crutches; others may be sent home wearing a surgical shoe. The foot will be covered in a dressing, which you will need to keep dry for up to two weeks or until the sutures are removed. During the first week after surgery, you will need to keep the foot elevated as much as possible. Ice packs also should be applied for the first three to four days to reduce swelling. Limited ambulation or walking is required over the first two weeks to promote healing. Most patients also are instructed on some basic exercises that need to be performed daily. Sutures are generally removed about two weeks after the surgery in the doctor’s office. Once the sutures are removed, you can bathe and shower normally, but will still need to wear a dressing over the wound to keep it clean and prevent infection. By the third or fourth week post surgery, swelling generally subsides enough for the patient to begin wearing a wide athletic shoe. It is important to continue daily exercises. If recommended, physical therapy may be initiated at this time. Once the wound has completely closed, you can use lotions to soften the skin in the surgical area. By week five after the surgery, you will be able to walk short distances and do mild fitness activities. Continue following your surgeons instructions for increasing exercise and activities until you are back to normal. Visit our website: *******www.footcare****
27 Oct 2011
797
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0:59
Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy) - Toronto Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal Doctor of Podiatric Medicine discusses Bunion Surgery (Bunionectomy). *******www.footcare**** Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Bunion surgeries fall into two major categories: • Head procedures that treat the big toe joint. In a head procedure bunionectomy, the bone is cut just behind the joint, moved into its proper position, and fixed in place with a screw or pin. Head procedures are often used for patients who cannot be immobilized for long periods of time. • Base procedures concentrate on the bone near or behind the big toe joint. Different types of base procedures are conducted depending on the nature of the deformity. These range from cutting a wedge out of the bone and splitting it so that it can be moved into its proper position; making a semi-circular cut and rotating the bone into its correct position; or fusing the joint. Ligaments inside and outside the toe may also be treated during a base procedure. There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. What To Expect Most bunions surgeries today are performed on an outpatient basis at a surgical center or hospital. Set aside the entire day for the surgery, although you may only be at the facility for a half day. Prior to the surgery, patients will need to make some preparatory arrangements. These include: • Seeing your Primary Care Physician (PCP) to make sure any other health conditions are stabilized prior to surgery and to document your complete medical history, which can then be given to the foot surgeon. • Arranging your schedule to make sure you don't need to take any long trips for at least two to three weeks following the surgery. • Lining up another person to drive you home and stay with you for the first 24 hours after the surgery. • Stopping the use of any anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen, for five to seven days before the surgery. The night before the surgery, you will not be able to eat or drink anything after midnight. You should also wash your foot the night before and morning of the procedure to help reduce surrounding bacteria and prevent infection. Bunion surgery is usually performed with a local anesthetic and is administered by an anesthesiologist. This may be combined with sedation medication to put you into twilight so that you are fully relaxed. After the surgery, patients are often given a long-acting anesthetic and pain medication, which is why someone else must drive the patient home. The type of procedure you have will determine the degree to which you can put weight on the foot immediately after the surgery. Some patients, particularly those having base procedures, may have to use crutches; others may be sent home wearing a surgical shoe. The foot will be covered in a dressing, which you will need to keep dry for up to two weeks or until the sutures are removed. During the first week after surgery, you will need to keep the foot elevated as much as possible. Ice packs also should be applied for the first three to four days to reduce swelling. Limited ambulation or walking is required over the first two weeks to promote healing. Most patients also are instructed on some basic exercises that need to be performed daily. Sutures are generally removed about two weeks after the surgery in the doctor’s office. Once the sutures are removed, you can bathe and shower normally, but will still need to wear a dressing over the wound to keep it clean and prevent infection. By the third or fourth week post surgery, swelling generally subsides enough for the patient to begin wearing a wide athletic shoe. It is important to continue daily exercises. If recommended, physical therapy may be initiated at this time. Once the wound has completely closed, you can use lotions to soften the skin in the surgical area. By week five after the surgery, you will be able to walk short distances and do mild fitness activities. Continue following your surgeons instructions for increasing exercise and activities until you are back to normal. Visit our website: *******www.footcare****
27 Oct 2011
397
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1:48
*******www.hsinjurylaw****/library/perforated-bowel-or-colon-during-hysterectomy-can-cause-major-medical-problems.cfm. My name is Jim Lewis and I'm a personal injury attorney based in Virginia Beach, Virginia. I know many women who have undergone hysterectomies. These procedures are performed because of a few reasons and essentially entail the surgical removal of a lady's uterus. This procedure has been getting performed laparoscopically more and more often. This type of surgery allows the doctor to achieve their surgical goals with a low number of incisions. With this type of surgery, the patient has a shorter hospital stay and recovery process. As nice as it sounds, the laparoscopic instrument offers lower visibility compared to an open incision. The result: one of the most common hysterectomy injuries to date is damage to one or both of the ureters. The ureter must be correctly identified and avoided during this type of procedure. If the ureter is injured, the patient can become quite sick and go through a number of surgeries, which are painful and take months to resolve, to try and fix the problem. Contact our Hampton Roads personal injury law firm If you or someone you know has suffered this type of injury. Our attorneys will help.
27 Oct 2011
274
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0:22
Foot Warts - Podiatrist Torrance, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes, CA Dr. Robert Anavian discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Foot Warts (Plantar Warts). Plantar Warts The common wart is known as verruca vulgaris. They are caused by a viral infection of the skin. This occurs as a result of direct contact with the virus. They do not spread through the blood stream. They occur more commonly in children than adults. When they occur on the bottom of the foot, they are called plantar warts. This name is derived from the location of the foot on which they are found; the bottom of the foot is called the plantar aspect of the foot. A common misconception is that plantar warts have seeds or roots that grow through the skin and can attach to the bone. The wart may appear to have a root or seeds, but these are in fact small clusters of the wart just beneath the top layer of the skin. The wart cannot live in any tissue except the skin. Moist, sweaty feet can predispose to infection by the wart virus. They can be picked up in showers and around swimming pools. They are not highly contagious, but being exposed in just the right situation will lead to the development of the wart. Avoiding contact in the general environment is nearly impossible. If a member of the family has the infection, care should be taken to keep shower and tile floor clean. Children who have plantar warts should not share their shoes with other people. Young girls often share shoes with their friends and this should be discouraged. Diagnosis The warts have the appearance of thick, scaly skin. They can occur as small, single warts or can cluster into large areas. These clustered warts are called mosaic warts. They often resemble plantar calluses. A simple way to tell the difference between a wart and a callus is to squeeze the lesion between your fingers in a pinching fashion. If this is painful, it is likely that the lesion is a wart. A callus is generally not painful with this maneuver but is tender with direct pressure by pressing directly on the lesion. Other lesions on the bottom of the foot that are often confused with plantars warts are porokeratoses and inclusion cysts. Treatment There are a variety of ways to treat warts. The over-the-counter medications have a difficult time penetrating the thick skin on the bottom of the foot, so they do not work well in this area. Professional treatment consists of burning the wart with topical acids, freezing with liquid nitrogen, laser surgery or cutting them out. All methods have the possibility of the wart coming back. Surgical excision of the wart has the highest success rate with a relatively low rate of recurrence. There is some mild discomfort with this procedure and it takes several weeks for the area to completely heal. Normal activity can generally be resumed in a few days depending on the size and number of warts that have been removed. The risks associated with surgical removal of warts are the possibility of infection, or the formation of a scar, which can be painful when weight is applied while walking. Laser removal of the wart works by burning the wart with a laser beam. The area must be numbed with an anesthetic prior to the procedure. There is little advantage to removing warts with a laser unless the warts are very large (mosaic warts) or there are a large number to be removed. The risks associated with the use of the laser are the same as for cutting the warts out. These risks include infection and the development of a scar after healing. A new type of laser has been developed to treat several different types of skin lesions called the Pulsed Dye Laser. This new laser has promise in the effective treatment of warts. Freezing the wart with liquid nitrogen is another form of treatment. This form of treatment when the warts are on the bottom of the foot can be very painful and take several days or weeks to heal. Topical acids can also be a useful means of treating warts. The advantage to this form of treatment is the fact that they are nearly painless and there is no restriction of activity. The down side to this form of treatment is that it frequently requires several treatments and the failure rate is higher than surgical excision of the wart. Visit our website: *******www.anavianfootcare****
1 Dec 2011
370
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1:04
Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Chiropodist Toronto, ON Chiropodist Marz Hardy of Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.academyclinics**** Ingrown Toenails Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.academyclinics****
6 Dec 2011
281
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0:49
Ingrown Toenails - Chiropodist in East Markham, Unionville and Stouffville, ON Brian Cragg, DCh, BSc (Hons) Podiatric Medicine discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for ingrown toenails. *******www.markhamfootcare**** Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Visit our website: *******www.markhamfootcare****
12 Dec 2011
143
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0:41
Bunion Surgery - Podiatrist in Frederick, Germantown and Hagerstown, MD Dr. Brenna Steinberg discusses Bunion Surgery. *******www.mynewfeet**** Bunions are progressive bone deformities of the foot that often cause recurring or chronic inflammation, irritation, and pain that require surgical correction. Surgical removal of a bunion is called a bunionectomy. However, there are multiple types of bunionectomies, each designed to resolve different structural changes caused by the deformity. Bunion surgeries fall into two major categories: • Head procedures that treat the big toe joint. In a head procedure bunionectomy, the bone is cut just behind the joint, moved into its proper position, and fixed in place with a screw or pin. Head procedures are often used for patients who cannot be immobilized for long periods of time. • Base procedures concentrate on the bone near or behind the big toe joint. Different types of base procedures are conducted depending on the nature of the deformity. These range from cutting a wedge out of the bone and splitting it so that it can be moved into its proper position; making a semi-circular cut and rotating the bone into its correct position; or fusing the joint. Ligaments inside and outside the toe may also be treated during a base procedure. There are three important factors that impact the success of bunion surgery: 1. Choose a surgeon with extensive experience with bunionectomies. Because a deep understanding of the biomechanics of each patient's foot as well as the intricacies of each surgical option is needed, surgeons with more experience at doing bunionectomies are better able to help each patient achieve the best outcome. 2. Be realistic in your expectation about what a bunionectomy can accomplish. No physician can guarantee that a bunion won't recur or that a patient will be absolutely pain free. Additionally, because of the complexity of the foot structures impacted by a bunion, patients may never be able to wear normal or slender shoes. Bunion surgery can reduce or eliminate the bone deformity, improve foot alignment and function, and prevent damage to other toes, but it does have its limitations. Be sure you understand all the possibilities before opting for this surgery. 3. Bunion surgery is not a magic bullet. Surgery alone may not be all that is needed to achieve your best outcome. After surgery, many patients experience long healing and recovery times and often have to spend time in physical therapy. Additionally, you may need a corrective orthotic device on an ongoing basis. What To Expect Most bunions surgeries today are performed on an outpatient basis at a surgical center or hospital. Set aside the entire day for the surgery, although you may only be at the facility for a half day. Prior to the surgery, patients will need to make some preparatory arrangements. These include: • Seeing your Primary Care Physician (PCP) to make sure any other health conditions are stabilized prior to surgery and to document your complete medical history, which can then be given to the foot surgeon. • Arranging your schedule to make sure you don't need to take any long trips for at least two to three weeks following the surgery. • Lining up another person to drive you home and stay with you for the first 24 hours after the surgery. • Stopping the use of any anti-inflammatory medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen, for five to seven days before the surgery. The night before the surgery, you will not be able to eat or drink anything after midnight. You should also wash your foot the night before and morning of the procedure to help reduce surrounding bacteria and prevent infection. Bunion surgery is usually performed with a local anesthetic and is administered by an anesthesiologist. This may be combined with sedation medication to put you into twilight so that you are fully relaxed. After the surgery, patients are often given a long-acting anesthetic and pain medication, which is why someone else must drive the patient home. The type of procedure you have will determine the degree to which you can put weight on the foot immediately after the surgery. Some patients, particularly those having base procedures, may have to use crutches; others may be sent home wearing a surgical shoe. The foot will be covered in a dressing, which you will need to keep dry for up to two weeks or until the sutures are removed. During the first week after surgery, you will need to keep the foot elevated as much as possible. Ice packs also should be applied for the first three to four days to reduce swelling. Limited ambulation or walking is required over the first two weeks to promote healing. Most patients also are instructed on some basic exercises that need to be performed daily. Sutures are generally removed about two weeks after the surgery in the doctor’s office. Once the sutures are removed, you can bathe and shower normally, but will still need to wear a dressing over the wound to keep it clean and prevent infection. By the third or fourth week post surgery, swelling generally subsides enough for the patient to begin wearing a wide athletic shoe. It is important to continue daily exercises. If recommended, physical therapy may be initiated at this time. Once the wound has completely closed, you can use lotions to soften the skin in the surgical area. By week five after the surgery, you will be able to walk short distances and do mild fitness activities. Continue following your surgeons instructions for increasing exercise and activities until you are back to normal. Visit our website: *******www.mynewfeet****
18 Dec 2011
298
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1:04
Ingrown Toenails - Foot Specialist, Podiatrist and Foot Doctor, Toronto, ON Chiropodist Marz Hardy of Academy Foot and Orthotic Clinics discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.academyclinics**** Ingrown Toenails Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.academyclinics****
22 Dec 2011
283
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2:45
It is interesting to note that as far as neo-Darwinism has actually influenced medical diagnostics, which hasn't been that much, it has led to medical malpractice: Evolution's "vestigial organ" argument debunked Excerpt: "The appendix, like the once 'vestigial' tonsils and adenoids, is a lymphoid organ (part of the body's immune system) which makes antibodies against infections in the digestive system. Believing it to be a useless evolutionary 'left over,' many surgeons once removed even the healthy appendix whenever they were in the abdominal cavity. Today, removal of a healthy appendix under most circumstances would be considered medical malpractice" (David Menton, Ph.D., "The Human Tail, and Other Tales of Evolution," St. Louis MetroVoice , January 1994, Vol. 4, No. 1). "Doctors once thought tonsils were simply useless evolutionary leftovers and took them out thinking that it could do no harm. Today there is considerable evidence that there are more troubles in the upper respiratory tract after tonsil removal than before, and doctors generally agree that simple enlargement of tonsils is hardly an indication for surgery" (J.D. Ratcliff, Your Body and How it Works, 1975, p. 137). The tailbone, properly known as the coccyx, is another supposed example of a vestigial structure that has been found to have a valuable function—especially regarding the ability to sit comfortably. Many people who have had this bone removed have great difficulty sitting. *******www.ucg****/science/god-science-and-bible-evolutions-vestigial-organ-argument-debunked/ Surgical removal of the tonsils and appendix associated with risk of early heart attack - June 2011 Excerpt: The surgical removal of the appendix and tonsils before the age of 20 was associated with an increased risk of premature heart attack in a large population study performed in Sweden. Tonsillectomy increased the risk by 44% (hazard ratio 1.44) and appendectomy by 33% (HR 1.33). The risk increases were just statistically significant, and were even higher when the tonsils and appendix were both removed. *******medicalxpress****/news/2011-06-surgical-tonsils-appendix-early-heart.html#share International HoloGenomics Society - "Junk DNA Diseases" Excerpt: A primary goal of IHGS is to elevate awareness of the fact that "some, if not all" hereditary diseases do not stop at the boundaries of "genes" *******www.junkdna****/junkdna_diseases.html Excerpt: "elaborated in more detail in my “Obituary of Junk DNA “ *******www.junkdna****/#obituary_of_junk_dna” ,,,uncounted millions of people died miserable deaths while scientists were looking for the “gene” causing their illnesses – and were not even supposed to look anywhere but under the lamp illuminating only 1.3% of the genome (the genes)." *******www.uncommondescent****/intelligent-design/the-discovery-institute-needs-to-be-destroyed/#comment-357177 "Certainly, my own research with antibiotics during World War II received no guidance from insights provided by Darwinian evolution. Nor did Alexander Fleming's discovery of bacterial inhibition by penicillin. I recently asked more than 70 eminent researchers if they would have done their work differently if they had thought Darwin's theory was wrong. The responses were all the same: No. Philip S. Skell - (the late) Professor at Pennsylvania State University. *******www.discovery****/a/2816 Darwinian Medicine and Proximate and Evolutionary Explanations - Michael Egnor June 2011 *******www.evolutionnews****/2011/06/darwinian_medicine_and_proxima047701.html
25 Dec 2011
558
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0:45
Ingrown Toenails - Chiropodist-Podiatrist in Mississauga, Oakville and Brampton, ON Chiropodist Bill Dedes discusses the symptoms, causes and treatment for ingrown toenails. Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, are usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases and if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Visit our website: *******www.mississaugafootcare.ca
27 Dec 2011
145
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0:57
Ingrown Toenails Treatment - Podiatrist Indianapolis and Franklin, IN Dr. Jeffrey Stevens of Indy South Foot and Ankle discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Ingrown Toenails. *******www.indysouthfootandankle**** Ingrown toenails, also known as onychocryptosis, is usually caused by trimming toenails too short, particularly on the sides of the big toes. They may also be caused by shoe pressure (from shoes that are too tight or short), injury, fungus infection, heredity, or poor foot structure. Ingrown toenails occur when the corners or sides of the toenail dig into the skin, often causing infection. A common ailment, ingrown toenails can be painful. Ingrown toenails start out hard, swollen, and tender. Left untreated, they may become sore, red, and infected and the skin may start to grow over the ingrown toenail. In most cases, treating ingrown toenails is simple: soak the foot in warm, soapy water several times each day. Avoid wearing tight shoes or socks. Antibiotics are sometimes prescribed if an infection is present. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications. In severe cases, if an acute infection occurs, surgical removal of part of the ingrown toenail may be needed. Known as partial nail plate avulsion, the procedure involves injecting the toe with an anesthetic and cutting out the ingrown part of the toenail. Ingrown toenails can be prevented by: • Trimming toenails straight across with no rounded corners. • Ensuring that shoes and socks are not too tight. • Keeping feet clean at all times. Visit our website: *******www.indysouthfootandankle****
11 Jan 2012
234
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