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2:41
"Around the World in a NYC Taxi" is a video installation in an actual 2003 Ford Crown Victoria decommissioned New York yellow cab. What makes the Big Apple so vibrant are the people. In a NYC cab, even though you are traveling across town, you can talk with the driver who often comes from one of the four corners of the world. Videos of my interviews with various NY cab drivers and scenes of the city are projected from inside the cab onto the vehicle's windows. The main film plays on both front driver and passenger side windows. The other windows show views of streets of the city taken as if you were sitting in the cab. This allows the viewer to walk around the cab and see these cabbies talk about their profession, NY, and homelands. The project was shown at Fountain NY 2006 and ArtCologne.When the project was exhibited at Fountain NY 2007, it received much attention and was documented in a number of online art journal websites. The NY show has also translated into an invitation to present the project in Germany at ArtCologne in April 2007. I have posted other works similar to this on my website: www.StevenGagnon****
13 Mar 2008
696
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0:24
F-15 Taxi
30 Jul 2008
1358
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3:38
*******www.mrpaparazzi**** Amy Winehouse has an argument with a taxi driver via the intercom in her house. The driver was waiting for Amy for an hour and a half and was not happy. He asks Amy why she kept him waiting and tells her she is rude.
4 Apr 2008
496
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3:43
Taxi សំបូរសេ្នហ៍ (ទីណា) #cls00206
7 Apr 2008
407
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6:55
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
7 Apr 2008
255
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5:08
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008 Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
8 Apr 2008
342
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7:21
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
9 Apr 2008
88
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1:07
BooM TAxi Knjazevac RTV VG4 Knjazevac *******www.knjazevac****.yu
9 Feb 2009
704
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1:04
Taxi Driver un video mas en Cutre Mascope la promocion del site oficial de la pelicula "Rebobine Por Favor" rebobineporfavor.es de Michel Gondry.
14 Apr 2008
372
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2:32
El primer anfitrión de Medellín es el conductor de un taxi. Medellín, la ciudad de las oportunidades, Alonso Salazar Jaramillo, Alcalde de Medellín.
9 May 2008
256
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3:02
Taxi mais moderno do mundo.
27 May 2008
130
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4:06
Commemorative film celebrating 50 years of Tyneside's largest taxi firm, as well as explaining how they are embracing 21st century technology to grow even further.
28 May 2008
261
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1:37
Limousines & Taxis in New York across New York and beyond
13 Jun 2009
2326
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1:05
NY Taxi
13 Jun 2008
26
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0:50
Giga TAxi Knjazevac sve o Knjazevcu na jednom mestu posetite www.knjazevac****.yu
22 Mar 2009
962
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2:40
What does it take to be one of Beijing's elite taxi heroes? We talk to He Sulin, an 11-year veteran and Olympic torch bearer.
26 Jun 2008
356
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