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3 REASONS WHY JINN ENTER THE BODY (JINN SERIES)
20 Oct 2017
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Looking for a better waist trainer? Visit MagicFit. MagicFit has been helping everyday people, people just like you, achieve the body silhouette that simply can’t be achieved through diet and exercise alone.
25 Sep 2017
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The guide wire by Nikotech is used as a guide for placing a larger device such as catheters. It is used to enter obstructed valves or channels within the body.
25 Sep 2017
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4:11
how to treat colon cancer with surgery |chemotherapy for colon cancer Depending upon the stage of colon cancer you have (stage I, II, III, or IV), you may be best treated with surgery, with chemotherapy, or with a combination of both. It is key to receive treatment for your colon cancer as soon as possible, and to follow up with regular visits with your physician following treatment to monitor your recovery and to check for any possible relapses. 1 Have your colon cancer staged.[1] Before deciding on any course of treatment, the first step is to confirm your diagnosis of colon cancer and to have the cancer, if it is indeed present, staged. Staging is done using additional scanning of the body with CT or PET scanning and a biopsy of the primary cancer lesion that was found. This is important for developing an individualized treatment plan. There are 4 stages of colon cancer: Stage I is limited to the bowel while stage IV has metastasized throughout the body, with stages II and III representing intermediate levels of severity without body-wide metastases. Stages I, II, and III are generally treated with surgery as the first-line option. Stages II and III may require "adjuvant" chemotherapy (chemotherapy to supplement the treatment following surgical excision of the cancer). Stage IV is treated predominantly with chemotherapy, and occasional surgery is used as an adjunct (as an addition) to remove masses causing pain, obstruction (blockage of the bowel), or that are otherwise problematical.
26 Sep 2017
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15:28
The lymphatic system is made up of lymph capillaries, vessels, and nodes, the spleen, thymus, tonsils, Peyer’s Patches, and lymphocytes (white blood cells). Red bone marrow is also a part of the lymphatic system. We have hundreds of lymph nodes. Lymph nodes can be found all around the lungs and heart, in the gut, in the armpits and groin, and pretty much all over the body. Blood pressure causes plasma liquid to leak into tissues, and this pressure causes excess fluid in those tissues to move into the lymph capillaries. As this fluid leaves the cells, it takes cellular waste products and used proteins with it. The lymphatic capillaries pick up approximately 20% of the fluid that was delivered to the interstitial space. The venous system picks up about 80% of the fluid in the interstitial space. The unique structure of the lymphatic capillaries permits interstitial fluid to flow into them but not out. Blood pressure, temperature, activity of muscle and joints, diaphragmatic breathing, and pulsation of adjacent arteries all cause lymph to move up to the subclavian veins at the base of the neck. Valves and pressure keep lymph moving in the right direction. Along the way, the fluid is interrupted by lymph nodes that filter dust, cancer cells, pathogens, and other unwanted matter. Lymph nodes also produce lymphocytes (white blood cells). The spleen, tonsils, and red bone marrow help produce lymphocytes as well. The spleen, which is about the size of our fist, is the largest lymphatic organ. It is similar in structure to a lymph node, but it filters blood, not lymph. The spleen contains two main types of tissue, white pulp and red pulp. White pulp is lymphatic tissue containing white blood cells – B and T cells. T cells attack pathogens (such as bacteria and viruses) while B cells make antibodies that fight infections. Red pulp tissue removes old and damaged red blood cells and stores platelets. It also produces red blood cells in unborn babies and when certain disease
26 Sep 2017
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15:44
When a person has experienced known or probable exposure to a high dose of radiation from an accident or attack, medical personnel take a number of steps to determine the absorbed radiation dose. This information is essential for determining how severe the illness is likely to be, which treatments to use and whether a person is likely to survive. Information important for determining an absorbed dose includes: Known exposure. Details about distance from the source of radiation and duration of exposure can help provide a rough estimate of the severity of radiation sickness. Vomiting and other symptoms. The time between radiation exposure and the onset of vomiting is a fairly accurate screening tool to estimate absorbed radiation dose. The shorter the time before the onset of this sign, the higher the dose. The severity and timing of other signs and symptoms also may help medical personnel determine the absorbed dose. Blood tests. Frequent blood tests over several days enable medical personnel to look for drops in disease-fighting white blood cells and abnormal changes in the DNA of blood cells. These factors indicate the degree of bone marrow damage, which is determined by the level of an absorbed dose. Dosimeter. A device called a dosimeter can measure the absorbed dose of radiation but only if it was exposed to the same radiation event as the affected person. Survey meter. A device such as a Geiger counter can be used to survey people to determine the body location of radioactive particles. Type of radiation. A part of the larger emergency response to a radioactive accident or attack would include identifying the type of radiation exposure. This information would guide some decisions for treating people with radiation sickness.
26 Sep 2017
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15:22
Men's hormones stay consistent overall, but women's hormones go through various levels of production based on the menstrual cycle. This constantly-changing cycle is normal for women until the age of approximately 50 years, when the body's hormonal state changes drastically in a very short period of time. When a year has passed without undergoing a period, we can know that a woman has entered the Menopause stage of her life. Even before officially entering Menopause, the phase we can Perimenopause occurs, in which the hormones Progesterone and Estrogen are reduced. Menopause can be extremely difficult for a woman, with physical and emotional effects. Menopause can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, and osteoporosis. They can also experience depression, weight gain, and higher levels of stress. To alleviate these serious symptoms, Estrogen Replacement Therapy may be well advised. Women who take supplementary estrogen, especially when their lifestyle is healthy overall, can experience weight loss, smoothed skin, reduced LDL cholesterol, improved libido and sexual function, and more. Talk with a physician who can understand your specific health condition and needs, and see if hormone replacement therapy may be right for you. To learn more about HGH injections please look us up on Google at "The Conscious Evolution Institute of Hormone Replacement Therapy" and visit our website at www dot HGH dot TV.
26 Sep 2017
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See the video and learn the heart attack symptoms and early warning signs in the body. At USCPROnline, now get CPR training and certification course at an affordable cost.
26 Sep 2017
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4:31
How to Reduce Lung Inflammation|medicine to take for inflammation Lung (pulmonary) inflammation affects the airways and lung tissue. Caused by the body’s immune response to injury or pathogens, inflammation can be acute (short-lasting) or chronic (long-lasting) in nature. Diseases associated with acute lung inflammation include acute lung infections, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Diseases associated with chronic lung inflammation include emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. Anyone can develop lung inflammation, but there are certain risk factors that increase one’s chances of developing this condition. These same risk factors can also make lung inflammation worse once a person has the condition. 1 Reduce your exposure to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause disease. Certain species of bacteria and fungi can cause lung inflammation. Exposure to some of these pathogens is associated with occupational or environmental conditions. For example “Hot Tub Lung,” and “Farmer’s Lung” are common names for two kinds of mold-related lung inflammation. [1] Mold can grow almost anywhere that is moist enough. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “the key to mold control is moisture control.” [2] To help prevent mold in your home, keep the humidity between 30-60%. [3] If you find mold, clean the affected surface with a detergent and dry the surface completely. Prevent condensation by properly insulating areas. Avoid installing carpet in bathrooms or kitchens, where sink splashes may keep the carpet damp. Use appropriate personal protective equipment such as masks or respirators when cleaning moldy areas.
27 Sep 2017
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4:38
How to Screen for Lung Cancer|cancer screening center Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among both genders in the U.S., claiming more lives than colon, prostate, ovarian and breast cancer combined.[1] People at the greatest risk for lung cancer include smokers and those who work with or around toxic chemicals, gases and irritating particles. Screening for lung cancer is important because it's much easier to treat in the early stages before spreading or metastasizing to other parts of the body. You can sort of screen / monitor yourself by understanding common symptoms, but periodically seeing your doctor for chest x-rays, sputum samples and/or CT scans is the best strategy. 1 Remember that early symptoms can be mild and vague. One of the reasons that lung cancer is so deadly is that the disease doesn't often cause noticeable symptoms during the early stages.[2] Furthermore, the mild symptoms of early stage lung cancer are often mistaken for a cold, bout of the flu, bronchitis or asthma. Common early signs of lung cancer (and most upper respiratory infections) include a mild, persistent cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, and weight loss. Signs and symptoms of lung cancer usually become noticeable once the disease is advanced, which is why it's such as deadly disease. The common cold, flu and bronchitis are viral infections that typically fade away two to three weeks, so if your symptoms persist, schedule an appointment with your doctor. 2 Be suspicious of a new cough that doesn't go away. One of the telltale symptoms of lung cancer is the development of a persistent cough that's either completely new or noticeably different than the typical dry, hacking smoker's cough.[3] In contrast to the dry and unproductive cough common with smokers, coughing up foul-smelling phlegm and even blood on occasion is not unusual with the mid-stages of lung cancer. Due to the constant coughing and slow destruction of tissue in the lungs from lung cancer, chest pain
27 Sep 2017
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How to Stage Lung Cancer|lung cancer treatment solutions Lung cancer that originates within the lungs is referred to as primary lung cancer, while lung cancer that kicks off in other parts of the body, metastasizes and lodges into the lungs is a secondary type of lung cancer. Each type of lung cancer is managed in different ways depending upon the severity of the condition and preference of the patient. Proper diagnosis and management are essential in the treatment of lung cancer, and staging the disease is an important part of this. 1 Understand the simple staging process. Stages of cancer are used to define the size of cancer cells or tumors and indicate whether the condition has already metastasized to other parts of the body. Stages are used to provide information necessary for determining the proper management for the particular stage of cancer. Some health care practitioners utilize a very simple form of staging lung cancer (most specifically for small cell lung cancer) which separates the cancer into two stages. 2 Begin with the limited disease characterization. This stage is characterized by the development of cancer cells just within one side of the lungs, in the lymph nodes near the lungs or in the fluids surrounding the lungs (pleural effusion). 3 Categorize extensive disease. In this stage of lung cancer, the disease has already spread into the lymph nodes outside the lungs
27 Sep 2017
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3:28
How to Treat Lung Cancer|stage one lung cancer treatment Lung cancer is a serious condition. You may feel scared and hopeless after you hear the diagnosis; however, there are many treatment options available for lung cancer. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, targeted therapy, and even clinical research trials. Learn how to treat lung cancer so you can choose the right plan for you. 1 Get a biopsy. Before you can start any kind of treatment for lung cancer, you need to get a biopsy of the lung. A biopsy will let your doctor know that you have cancer and what type of cancer you have.[1] During a biopsy, the doctor will get a small tissue sample of your lung. They can do this through a needle, a tube sent into the lungs, through the chest wall, or through an incision. After they get the tissue sample, they check the sample under a microscope for cancerous cells. 2 Determine the stage of cancer. Lung cancer is divided into four different stages. Stages refer to the severity of the cancer. The stage of lung cancer you have may influence your treatment options.[3] Stage I cancer is when the area affected by the cancer is small. It is usually only in one area of the lung. Surgery is often used to treat this stage of cancer. Stage II and III is when the cancer has progressed and infected a larger area of the lungs. The cancer may have spread to surrounding tissues. The cancer may also be in the lymph nodes. A combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation is common for stage II and III cancers.[4] Stage IV is the most advanced stage of cancer. This means the cancer has spread beyond the lungs into other parts of the body. For stage IV lung cancer, all treatments are options for helping you live longer and reducing any symptoms 3 Identify the type of lung cancer. If you have lung cancer, you can have either a carcinoid tumor, small cell lung cancer or non-small cell lung cancer. Most lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer. Small cell
27 Sep 2017
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