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2:22
The time of the event is in the range from late 1929th until early September 1930th year. When the football players, a great national heroes, the story of the then cultural and social events, first in Belgrade, struggling with everyday drama of the poor, but first unspoiled football with one hand, and Belgrade and the Yugoslav bourgeoisie on the other. The story follows their lives, personal problems, collision by a real desire for the sport by demonstrating against the usual city life, customs and the need for work and survival posed by Belgrade and Yugoslavia in the period between two world wars. In addition to the main protogoniste, cultural and social life of the city of Belgrade is presented through a lot of secondary characters who belong to different classes of society, through their thinking, set for life and small things.
4 Apr 2012
129
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1:00
*******www.insidehollywoodsports**** - Sportsrobe a division of Sports Studio helped wardrobe the football players in one of the funniest football commercials of all time. Never put depressants in the Gatorade...
2 Mar 2010
174
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1:30
*******www.insidehollywoodsports**** - Sportsrobe a division of Sports Studio helped wardrobe Adrian Peterson and the rest of the football players in this Nike Alter Ego Football commercial.
1 Mar 2010
440
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6:31
From *******p01football**** this is Part 5 of the Football Speed Training How to Get Interceptions series. We are developing defensive backs, your linebackers, and safeties, how to put them into position so they can create plays on the field, and how to get turnovers and get touchdowns on the defensive side of the ball. In this season of college recruiting one of the biggest key phrases you'll here is "what skill set does the player have" from college coaches. These are the types of drills that nfl scouts use, and coaches use to evaluate skill set. This drill is called in and outs where the defensive back is constantly changing speeds. Some things to point out is how the football player keeps his eye on the quarterback, keeps his body height constant and steady. Also, in this episode we focus on the type of mindset a football player should have on the football field. Distributed by Tubemogul.
21 Feb 2010
142
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2:52
The painful moments of football
14 Feb 2009
509988
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0:53
The Modern Football Player (2007) Modern Football Player represents the fashionable, current way football players are seen by people. They are considered to be the new Gods; leaders whom to follow and copy. Focus of this installation, definitely severe and boundary-setting in its communication, is to draws a parallel between religion, more specifically Catholicism and modern, somehow distorted- sports leading figures. As the football player, contemporary icon and god-like figure, raises the ball above his head to signify his control over as well as his possession of it, and his glory over success during public exposure, so does the priest raise above his head the holy wafer during the consecration liturgy, to indicate the strength he absorbs from a power not everyone can partake in, the apogee of his divine sharing. Control lays in the hands of the chosen few, who can act as entertainers, guides, icons, figures into which everyone can project their frustrated narcissistic phantasies of omnipotence and glory, of being part of an elite, of being extolled for their much envied uniqueness. In Church, as in the stadium, Fab3 suggests that one can bask for a while in the spotlight/divine light of those who are above, unreachable, those who cannot be antagonised but are there to impose an agonising standard, not to be reached but to be feared. Like paternal figures, seductive, potent, powerful, yet castrating, football player and priest cannot but be celebrated, thus relieve those in their presence of either their inferiority concerns or of their own fantasies of divine rule over others. The spectators/church-goers are stripped of their individuality by being portrayed through stick-figures, smaller in size, naked of any humanity, standing begging for meaning, for the glorified father to blow the air of life into them, to acknowledge their right to existence. Partaking in one's glory makes them glorious, protects them from the potential fury of those who seem so overpowering. Being their admirer secures a VIP ticket to "heaven". The spectators/believers are there precisely in order to highlight the divinity of the superhuman, whom they both envy, desire, need, and fear. There is no real relation between spectators and the superhuman figure of the football player, other than a fantasy net, knitted for different purpose on each side, to support the distance between them. The crowd needs to be hypnotised, for no other state of mind could tolerate that segregation. They, football player and priest alike, have access to the divine mother, the super-model wife, the wealth of glory, fame, and paradise. Here the phrase "if you can't beat them, join them" best describes the committed disavowal of one's own uniqueness and placement of it on a figure outside the self that can be safely loved or hated, act as a protector, entertainer, or demagogue. The interdependence of crowd and superhuman figure is astounding, as is the understanding that one can be on either side. Fab3 brings us through this installation to the peeping hole that offers view to our own relationships, public and private, sexual and political, religious and racial, familial and social.
7 Jul 2008
472
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1:19
The Modern Football Player (2007) Modern Football Player represents the fashionable, current way football players are seen by people. They are considered to be the new Gods; leaders whom to follow and copy. Focus of this installation, definitely severe and boundary-setting in its communication, is to draws a parallel between religion, more specifically Catholicism and modern, somehow distorted- sports leading figures. As the football player, contemporary icon and god-like figure, raises the ball above his head to signify his control over as well as his possession of it, and his glory over success during public exposure, so does the priest raise above his head the holy wafer during the consecration liturgy, to indicate the strength he absorbs from a power not everyone can partake in, the apogee of his divine sharing. Control lays in the hands of the chosen few, who can act as entertainers, guides, icons, figures into which everyone can project their frustrated narcissistic phantasies of omnipotence and glory, of being part of an elite, of being extolled for their much envied uniqueness. In Church, as in the stadium, Fab3 suggests that one can bask for a while in the spotlight/divine light of those who are above, unreachable, those who cannot be antagonised but are there to impose an agonising standard, not to be reached but to be feared. Like paternal figures, seductive, potent, powerful, yet castrating, football player and priest cannot but be celebrated, thus relieve those in their presence of either their inferiority concerns or of their own fantasies of divine rule over others. The spectators/church-goers are stripped of their individuality by being portrayed through stick-figures, smaller in size, naked of any humanity, standing begging for meaning, for the glorified father to blow the air of life into them, to acknowledge their right to existence. Partaking in one's glory makes them glorious, protects them from the potential fury of those who seem so overpowering. Being their admirer secures a VIP ticket to "heaven". The spectators/believers are there precisely in order to highlight the divinity of the superhuman, whom they both envy, desire, need, and fear. There is no real relation between spectators and the superhuman figure of the football player, other than a fantasy net, knitted for different purpose on each side, to support the distance between them. The crowd needs to be hypnotised, for no other state of mind could tolerate that segregation. They, football player and priest alike, have access to the divine mother, the super-model wife, the wealth of glory, fame, and paradise. Here the phrase "if you can't beat them, join them" best describes the committed disavowal of one's own uniqueness and placement of it on a figure outside the self that can be safely loved or hated, act as a protector, entertainer, or demagogue. The interdependence of crowd and superhuman figure is astounding, as is the understanding that one can be on either side. Fab3 brings us through this installation to the peeping hole that offers view to our own relationships, public and private, sexual and political, religious and racial, familial and social.
7 Jul 2008
477
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3:51
Had sand kicked in your face by a “muscle man”? Taunted by the football players in your class? Use this latest lesson by HotForWords to change your perception of the situation, and you’ll have the “muscle men” cowering in the corner and the ladies swooning all over you in minutes! Guaranteed!
18 May 2008
3795
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1:17
the guard dog bite the football player, something that very rare to see
28 Nov 2007
203
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0:30
What Happen if the football player get a dance training?
23 Sep 2007
759
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