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1:13
Fort Ross is a former trading post in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada. It was founded in 1937, and was the last trading post to be established by the Hudson's Bay Company. Join Marjorie Adams and Sarah Marcus, as they visit this uninhabited historic site and explore the house that their ancestor helped to build. Want to plan your trip to Canada? Visit *******www.canada.travel
11 Feb 2010
216
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1:14
The Hudson Mohawk Area Health Education Center is a group that is focused on bringing much needed health care workers to under served areas of their community. Video created by *******www.biglerproductions****
18 Feb 2010
51
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2:39
On the five year anniversary of the death of his pregnant wife, a thirty something financial writer decides to mark the day by swimming the length of the Hudson River, all 150-miles of it.
26 Feb 2010
235
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0:38
*******www.jomadeals**** Pulsar Tech Gear Flight Computer Alarm Chronograph Mens Watch PF3779. A sweet, tech-solid watch from Pulsar. It’s so great, you won’t be able to do anything without it. This deal of the day is $89.99 (70% off the $300 retail price). Daily Deal ends at midnight tonight (EST). February 26, 2010. ”Mayday, mayday. Come in, flight control.” “This is flight control. We read you. What is your emergency? Over.” “We can’t land the plane. There has been an incident that has caused a serious equipment malfunction. Over.” “What equipment has failed? Over.” “My wrist watch.” “…” “Oops. I mean, my wrist watch, over.” “Uh…can you explain why a failed watch makes it so you can’t land the plane?” “My co-pilot Captain ‘Moron’ flushed it down the toilet when I wouldn’t agree with him that Brett Favre is a better overall quarterback than Drew Brees. Now I don’t have my watch and I can’t land the plane. Over.” “A failing watch is not considered a landing emergency. You’re fine. Over.” “I am NOT fine. Have you seen my watch? It’s a Tech Gear Flight Computer Men’s watch from Pulsar. It’s made of high tech Japanese Quartz, strong scratch resistant Hardlex Crystal, and comes with alarm chronograph and Flight Computer 1/5-second stop watch. And I got it at a 70% discount. I’m useless without it. Over.” “…” “I said over already.” “Can’t you just borrow someone else’s watch?” “Ew! Are you serious? That’d be like wearing someone else’s socks; socks that aren’t as cool and tech-y as the socks your co-pilot just flushed down the toilet.” “Captain, seriously. Just land the plane. We’ve got a lot going on here and don’t have time to…” “Screw it. We’ll be in the Hudson.” “You’re over Denver.” “We’ll be in the Hudson.” Jomadeals**** does not ship outside the USA and its territories. Shoppers from outside the USA may place orders for delivery within the United States. Product ships 3-7 business days after order. SPECIFICATIONS Style: Dress/Sport. Flight Alarm Chronograph is a real favorite among pilots and sportsmen all over the world Brand: Pulsar Model: PF3779 Gender: Mens Manufacturer Item: PU-PF3779 Movement: Quality Japanese quartz Power: Battery Case Material: Stainless Steel Case Shape: Round Case Diameter: 45mm Case Dimensions: 49 millimeters with crown & protector Case Thickness: 14 mm Case Back: Screw-Down Closed Bezel: Black Stainless Steel Coin Edged with engraved markers Bezel Function: Bidirectional Slide Rule (E6B Pilot's Slide Rule) - Fuel consumption calculations, Flight climb calculations Dial Color: Black carbon fiber Dial Markers: Stick Index Luminescent with Arabic numbers Dial Type: Analog Sub Dials: Alarm, 60 second and 60 minute subdials Hands: Silver Tone Hands Luminescent with Red Central Second Luminescent: Hands and markers Calendar: Date displays at 3 o'clock position Crystal: HARDLEX Scratch Resistant Mineral Crown: Crown Protector adds extra security against accidental bumps or time resets Band Color: Two tone Silver and Black Band Length: Fits Wrist Size up to 9 inches Band Width: 22 mm Band Material: Stainless Steel Clasp Type: Fold-Over Clasp with Push Button and Safety Flap Functions: Chronograph, calendar, alarm Water Resistance: 100 meters / 330 feet / 10 ATM (suitable for swimming and shallow snorkeling; unsuitable for diving) Alarm Type: Easy-to-use 12 hour analog alarm Misc Information: Alarm chronograph with flight computer. Crown protector. Battery Life: Approximately 3 Years Stopwatch: 1/5th second stopwatch records elapsed time up to 60 minutes. Split time measurement. Warranty: 3 Year JomDeals ABOUT BRAND Pulsar was born in an age of optimism. In the 1970's, everything seemed achievable through the rapidly growing technological expertise at the world's fingertips. Space flight had been converted from dream to reality, computer science was developing at break neck speed and electronics seemed to deliver new advances every day. Pulsar symbolized the age. It was new and it was bold, it was surprising and it was different. Pulsar, the world's first electronic digital watch, created a sensation when it was unveiled in New York in 1972 and it changed the world's perception of time. When the brand was taken into the Seiko Corporation in 1980, it brought further surprises to the world; the first calculator watch in 1980 and the first all-quartz watch line in 1981 were among its industry-leading achievements. And throughout the '80's and 90's Pulsar continued to bring to market new products that were born to be different. The Avant-garde collection in 1980's set a new style in women's watches and Spoon in 1990's were unique designs which further cemented Pulsar's image as an ingenious and surprising watchmaker. Today, Pulsar remains loyal to its heritage. It was born to be different and it will remain so. Each Pulsar watch has the hint of the futurism and modernity that have always been its hallmark. Pulsar is a brand for the individual who appreciates real value and seeks quality with individuality and flair.
3 Apr 2012
1466
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2:13
www.justforkicks**** - Just For Kicks Martial Arts Is The Hudson Valley's Premier Martial Arts Training Facility. This Video Shows The Hudson Valley Horrors Professional Roller Derby Team Working On Conditioning With Us.
2 Mar 2010
118
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0:40
On the New Jersey side of Blvd East over looking The Hudson River where the fireworks were being displayed that year.
28 Mar 2010
348
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0:36
*******www.jomadeals**** A sleek, masculine watch with tons of features that you won’t want to live without. This deal of the day is $109.99 (81% off the $580 retail price). Sale ends at midnight tonight (EST). Oh no! The evil Decepticons are attacking New York City! What do we do?! Beep Beep. Don’t worry, human. I am an Autobot, and will transform in order to protect you. Oh, sweet! Thank goodness. What do you turn into? A truck? A fighter jet? A Battleship? What? Buzz. Wirr. A watch. Huh? Like, a super loaded artillery watch? No silly human. A Seiko men’s watch. Beep. I don’t follow. This Seiko men’s watch is the most awesome force mankind has ever seen. It comes with a gunmetal rubber strap and stainless steel case, superior quartz movement, super scratch resistant Hardlex Crystal, chronograpah, alarm, and tachymeter bezel. There are many other features, which I will describe one by one in great detail until…” Okay, they just destroyed the Chrysler Building! We don’t have time for this! How is a watch supposed to defeat the Decepticons! Well, it also comes with 100m water resistance, so I figured you could strap me on and we could swim across the Hudson to safety. You in? What!? I can’t just…yea, okay. This movie wasn’t very good anyway.” “What about the girl?” “Leave her.” Jomadeals**** does not ship outside the USA and its territories. Shoppers from outside the USA may place orders for delivery within the United States. Product ships 3-7 business days after order. SPECIFICATIONS Brand: Seiko Model: SNAB39P1, SNAB39 Gender: Mens Manufacturer Item: SE-SNAB39P1 Collection: Chronograph Movement: Japan quartz chronograph Engine: Caliber 7T62 Case Material: Stainless steel Case Shape: Round Case Diameter: 41.2mm Case Dimensions: 43 mm including crown Case Thickness: 9.5mm Bezel Function: Fixed Bezel Material: Stainless steel Dial Color: Black with textured design Dial Markers: Silver tone hour markers Dial Type: Analog Sub Dials: 60-second, 30-minutes and 12-hour alarm sub dials Hands: Silver tone hour and minute hands, center stopwatch 1/5 second, alarm hour and munute, small second, stopwatch minute Luminescent: Hands and hour markers Calendar: Date calendar at 3 o'clock position Crystal: Hardlex Band Type: Strap Band Color: Black Band Length: Fits wrist size up to 8.5 inches Band Material: Rubber Clasp Material: Stainless steel Clasp Type: Buckle Functions: Chronograph, alarm, hours, minutes, seconds, battery life indicator Water Resistance: 100m / 330ft / 10ATM Alarm Type: Single-time alarm (beep sound), alarm hour and minute hands Misc Information: Tachymeter at the outer circumference of the dial Battery: SEIKO SR927W Battery Life: About 3 years Stopwatch: Measures up to 60 minutes. Stopwatch minute and 1/5-second hands Warranty: 3 Year Jomadeals Warranty ABOUT BRAND For over 125 years, Seiko watches combine a culture of a 19th century Tokyo clock shop with 20th century advances in timekeeping for the 21st century. Continually driven by dedication and passion, established a multitude of world’s first technologies, transforming the principles of timekeeping including a first quartz watch and the first kinetic watch which is powered by body movement. Seiko has been official timekeeper of the Olympic Games, Soccer World Cup, and Athletics World Championships. Countless innovations and achievements have been produced by this stellar Japanese company.
12 Jan 2011
980
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5:51
Looking back to the beginning of the Last New Century, one realizes that the upheaval and change bemoaned in the contemporary art world had already begun. Sullivan Goss will exhibit paintings from the Hudson River Valley School, American Barbizon, American Renaissance, Orientalism, Luminism, Realism, Impressionism, Symbolism, Art Nouveau, and Arts and Crafts.
27 Apr 2010
321
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0:45
*******www.justforkicks**** - Beacon Karate - Sara Gunn of the Hudson Valley Branch Of The American Cancer Society Gives Rave Reviews Of Just For Kicks Martial Arts And Their Program.
20 May 2010
211
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0:45
*******www.justforkicks**** - Cold Spring Karate - Sara Gunn of the Hudson Valley Branch Of The American Cancer Society Gives Rave Reviews Of Just For Kicks Martial Arts And Their Program.
17 May 2010
282
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0:45
*******www.justforkicks**** - Fishkill Karate - Sara Gunn of the Hudson Valley Branch Of The American Cancer Society Gives Rave Reviews Of Just For Kicks Martial Arts And Their Program.
22 May 2010
281
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2:15
The day after Sully Sullenberger put Flight 1549 down in the Hudson without anyone being injured or killed, I thought, "Angels do exist." I was scheduled to play at a coffee house in Annapolis, MD that night and was looking for a song that would pay tribute to that extraordinary event. I couldn't think of one. Finally I thought, doh! why don't I write a folk tune myself. An hour and a half later, I was pretty much done. It was well received then and continues to be.
9 Aug 2010
274
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1:14
Legitimate - Work From Home - Home Based Business - Utah Salt Lake City* Salt Lake 181,698 &0000000000000110370000110.37 !110.37 sq mi (285.9 km2) 4,226 feet (1,288 m) 1847 $36,944 Nearby Great Salt Lake West Valley City Salt Lake 123,447 &000000000000003545000035.45 !35.45 sq mi (91.8 km2) 4,304 feet (1,312 m) 1849 $45,773 Located on the western side of the Salt Lake Valley Provo* Utah 118,581 &000000000000004178999941.79 !41.79 sq mi (108.2 km2) 4,551 feet (1,387 m) 1850 $34,313 Étienne Provost, a trapper who visited the area West Jordan Salt Lake 104,447 &000000000000003089999930.90 !30.90 sq mi (80.0 km2) 4,373 feet (1,333 m) 1848 $55,794 Located on the west side of the Jordan River Sandy Salt Lake 96,660 &000000000000002235000022.35 !22.35 sq mi (57.9 km2) 4,450 feet (1,360 m) 1871 $66,458 [c] Orem Utah 93,250 &000000000000001844000018.44 !18.44 sq mi (47.8 km2) 4,774 feet (1,455 m) 1850 $47,529 Walter Orem, President of the Salt Lake and Utah Electric Interurban Railroad Ogden* Weber 82,865 &000000000000002664000026.64 !26.64 sq mi (69.0 km2) 4,300 feet (1,300 m) 1847 $34,047 Peter Skene Ogden, a trapper for the Hudson Bay Company St. George* Washington 72,718 &000000000000006487000064.87 !64.87 sq mi (168.0 km2) 2,860 feet (870 m) 1861 $36,505 George A. Smith, a LDS Church Apostle Layton Davis 65,514 &000000000000002083999920.84 !20.84 sq mi (54.0 km2) 4,350 feet (1,330 m) [b] $52,128 Christopher Layton, an early LDS Bishop Taylorsville Salt Lake 58,785 &000000000000001067999910.68 !10.68 sq mi (27.7 km2) 4,295 feet (1,309 m) 1848 $47,236 John Taylor, LDS Church President South Jordan Salt Lake 51,131 &000000000000002103000021.03 !21.03 sq mi (54.5 km2) 4,439 feet (1,353 m) 1859 $75,433 The nearby Jordan River and its location south of West Jordan Logan* Cache 48,657 &000000000000001705000017.05 !17.05 sq mi (44.2 km2) 4,534 feet (1,382 m) 1859 $30,778 Ephraim Logan, a trapper with Jedediah Smith who died in the area Lehi Utah 46,802 &000000000000002057000020.57 !20.57 sq mi (53.3 km2) 4,564 feet (1,391 m) 1850 $53,028 Lehi, a prophet from the Book of Mormon Murray Salt Lake 46,201 &00000000000000096099999.61 !9.61 sq mi (24.9 km2) 4,301 feet (1,311 m) 1848 $45,569 Eli Houston Murray, territorial Governor of Utah Bountiful Davis 44,473 &000000000000001347000013.47 !13.47 sq mi (34.9 km2) 4,797 feet (1,462 m) 1847 $55,993 The Book of Mormon city of Bountiful Draper Salt Lake/ Utah 42,317 &000000000000003035000030.35 !30.35 sq mi (78.6 km2) 4,505 feet (1,373 m) 1849 $72,341 William Draper, the town's first LDS Church Bishop Riverton Salt Lake 39,751 &000000000000001257000012.57 !12.57 sq mi (32.6 km2) 4,439 feet (1,353 m) 1870 $63,980 The city's location next to the Jordan River Roy Weber 35,672 &00000000000000075999997.60 !7.60 sq mi (19.7 km2) 4,541 feet (1,384 m) 1876 $49,611 Roy was the name of the recently deceased son of area resident David P. Peebles Cottonwood Heights Salt Lake 35,418 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 4,823 feet (1,470 m) 1848 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] Cottonwood trees found in the area Pleasant Grove Utah 33,798 &00000000000000087200008.72 !8.72 sq mi (22.6 km2) 4,623 feet (1,409 m) 1849 $52,036 The grove of cottonwood trees found in the area Spanish Fork Utah 31,538 &000000000000001324000013.24 !13.24 sq mi (34.3 km2) 4,577 feet (1,395 m) 1851 $48,705 The nearby Spanish Fork River where Spanish explorer Silvestre Vélez de Escalante entered the Utah Valley Tooele* Tooele 30,120 &000000000000002116000021.16 !21.16 sq mi (54.8 km2) 5,043 feet (1,537 m) 1851 $43,862 Native American Goshute tribe leader Tuilla Cedar City Iron 28,667 &000000000000002008999920.09 !20.09 sq mi (52.0 km2) 5,846 feet (1,782 m) 1851 $32,043 Large number of cedar trees in the area Springville Utah 28,520 &000000000000001153999911.54 !11.54 sq mi (29.9 km2) 4,577 feet (1,395 m) 1850 $46,472 The nearby springs Midvale Salt Lake 28,129 &00000000000000058399995.84 !5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2) 4,383 feet (1,336 m) [b] $40,130 Located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley Clearfield Davis 27,851 &00000000000000077500007.75 !7.75 sq mi (20.1 km2) 4,465 feet (1,361 m) 1877 $38,946 The open surroundings of the area American Fork Utah 27,064 &00000000000000075400007.54 !7.54 sq mi (19.5 km2) 4,606 feet (1,404 m) 1850 $51,955 American Fork River, a tributary of Utah Lake Kaysville Davis 25,820 &000000000000001008999910.09 !10.09 sq mi (26.1 km2) 4,357 feet (1,328 m) 1849 $60,383 William Kay, the area's first LDS Church Bishop Holladay Salt Lake 25,676 &00000000000000053399995.34 !5.34 sq mi (13.8 km2) 4,464 feet (1,361 m) 1848 $55,468 John Holladay, an early settler of the area Eagle Mountain Utah 22,309 &000000000000004171000041.71 !41.71 sq mi (108.0 km2) 4,882 feet (1,488 m) [b] $52,102 Eagle Mountain Properties, the development company of the city Syracuse Davis 22,195 &00000000000000087100008.71 !8.71 sq mi (22.6 km2) 4,285 feet (1,306 m) 1878 $58,223 Named for a local resort on the Great Salt Lake which was named after Syracuse, New York South Salt Lake Salt Lake 21,607 &00000000000000069100006.91 !6.91 sq mi (17.9 km2) 4,225 feet (1,288 m) [b] $29,801 Located south of Salt Lake City Clinton Davis 19,885 &00000000000000055000005.50 !5.50 sq mi (14.2 km2) 4,393 feet (1,339 m) 1870s $53,909 [c] Brigham City* Box Elder 18,709 &000000000000001433999914.34 !14.34 sq mi (37.1 km2) 4,436 feet (1,352 m) 1850 $42,335 Brigham Young, LDS Church President and first territorial Governor of Utah Washington Washington 17,716 &000000000000003155000031.55 !31.55 sq mi (81.7 km2) 2,792 feet (851 m) 1857 $35,341 George Washington, President of the United States Herriman Salt Lake 17,689 &00000000000000091199999.12 !9.12 sq mi (23.6 km2) 5,000 feet (1,500 m) 1849 $56,361 Henry Herriman, a prominent resident of the area North Ogden Weber 17,682 &00000000000000065000006.50 !6.50 sq mi (16.8 km2) 4,501 feet (1,372 m) 1850 $59,556 Located north of Ogden Payson Utah 17,429 &00000000000000067900006.79 !6.79 sq mi (17.6 km2) 4,700 feet (1,400 m) 1850 $43,539 James Pace, an early settler of the area Farmington* Davis 17,217 &00000000000000077599997.76 !7.76 sq mi (20.1 km2) 4,304 feet (1,312 m) 1847 $74,250 The farms found in the area Highland Utah 16,189 &00000000000000069600006.96 !6.96 sq mi (18.0 km2) 4,977 feet (1,517 m) 1875[20] $80,053 Town's location on the upper bench of the Utah Valley Saratoga Springs Utah 16,053 &000000000000001034999910.35 !10.35 sq mi (26.8 km2) 4,505 feet (1,373 m) [b] $62,212 Saratoga, New York and the local springs South Ogden Weber 15,891 &00000000000000036699993.67 !3.67 sq mi (9.5 km2) 4,449 feet (1,356 m) 1848 $46,794 Located south of Ogden Centerville Davis 15,720 &00000000000000060400006.04 !6.04 sq mi (15.6 km2) 4,377 feet (1,334 m) 1848[13] $64,818 Center between Farmington and Bountiful[13] North Salt Lake Salt Lake 13,446 &00000000000000082500008.25 !8.25 sq mi (21.4 km2) 4,334 feet (1,321 m) [b] $47,052 Located north of Salt Lake City Hurricane Washington 13,321 &000000000000003155000031.55 !31.55 sq mi (81.7 km2) 3,248 feet (990 m) 1906[23] $32,865 LDS Church Apostle Erastus Snow's comments about the heavy wind in the area Lindon Utah 10,466 &00000000000000085800008.58 !8.58 sq mi (22.2 km2) 4,642 feet (1,415 m) 1850 $61,964 Linden, a tree that grew in the center of town Alpine Utah 9,885 &00000000000000072000007.20 !7.20 sq mi (18.6 km2) 4,951 feet (1,509 m) 1850 $72,880 Adjacent high mountains of the Wasatch Mountains and Traverse Mountains Heber* Wasatch 9,830 &00000000000000034500003.45 !3.45 sq mi (8.9 km2) 5,604 feet (1,708 m) 1858 $45,394 Heber C. Kimball, an Apostle of the LDS Church Cedar Hills Utah 9,551 &00000000000000019700001.97 !1.97 sq mi (5.1 km2) 4,957 feet (1,511 m) [b] $62,668 Local cedar tree covered hills Smithfield Cache 9,535 &00000000000000043099994.31 !4.31 sq mi (11.2 km2) 4,603 feet (1,403 m) 1859 $47,745 John Glover Smith, the first LDS Bishop of the area Grantsville Tooele 9,049 &000000000000001785000017.85 !17.85 sq mi (46.2 km2) 4,304 feet (1,312 m) 1850 $45,614 Colonel George D. Grant of the Nauvoo Legion West Point Davis 9,001 &00000000000000072199997.22 !7.22 sq mi (18.7 km2) 4,314 feet (1,315 m) 1867 $56,563 [c] Woods Cross Davis 8,705 &00000000000000036000003.60 !3.60 sq mi (9.3 km2) 4,377 feet (1,334 m) 1865 $46,271 Daniel C. Wood, an early settler Vernal* Uintah 8,696 &00000000000000045800004.58 !4.58 sq mi (11.9 km2) 5,328 feet (1,624 m) 1876 $30,357 Latin word vernalis for spring, for the many springs in the area[36] Washington Terrace Weber 8,515 &00000000000000019099991.91 !1.91 sq mi (4.9 km2) 4,610 feet (1,410 m) 1878 $42,243 [c] North Logan Cache 8,466 &00000000000000069299996.93 !6.93 sq mi (17.9 km2) 4,692 feet (1,430 m) [b] $49,154 Located north of Logan Santaquin Utah 8,400 &00000000000000026099992.61 !2.61 sq mi (6.8 km2) 4,984 feet (1,519 m) 1851 $44,531 A local Ute Tribe leader West Haven Weber 8,357 &000000000000001016999910.17 !10.17 sq mi (26.3 km2) 4,272 feet (1,302 m) 1854 $57,120 [c] Riverdale Weber 8,126 &00000000000000044400004.44 !4.44 sq mi (11.5 km2) 4,370 feet (1,330 m) 1850[32] $44,375 The city's location next to the Ogden River Price* Carbon 8,039 &00000000000000042400004.24 !4.24 sq mi (11.0 km2) 5,627 feet (1,715 m) 1879 $31,687 From the nearby Price River which got its name from a local explorer William Price Bluffdale Salt Lake 8,016 &000000000000001642999916.43 !16.43 sq mi (42.6 km2) 4,436 feet (1,352 m) 1886 $66,615 The bluffs along the Jordan River Park City Summit 7,980 &00000000000000094299999.43 !9.43 sq mi (24.4 km2) 7,000 feet (2,100 m) 1869 $65,800 For nearby Parley's Park, a meadow atop Parley's Canyon Mapleton Utah 7,954 &00000000000000092300009.23 !9.23 sq mi (23.9 km2) 4,731 feet (1,442 m) 1856 $60,985 For the groves of maple trees found in the area Ivins Washington 7,870 &000000000000001026999910.27 !10.27 sq mi (26.6 km2) 3,081 feet (939 m) 1922[24] $41,297 Anthony W. Ivins, a LDS Church Apostle Hyrum Cache 7,636 &00000000000000039199993.92 !3.92 sq mi (10.2 km2) 4,698 feet (1,432 m) 1860 $43,981 Hyrum Smith, brother to LDS Church founder Joseph Smith, Jr. Richfield* Sevier 7,217 &00000000000000052800005.28 !5.28 sq mi (13.7 km2) 5,354 feet (1,632 m) 1863 $36,024 After a bountiful crop of wheat that was produced in 1865 Pleasant View Weber 7,052 &00000000000000067300006.73 !6.73 sq mi (17.4 km2) 5,632 feet (1,717 m) 1851 $62,123 For the beautiful view of the surrounding valley Santa Clara Washington 6,866 &00000000000000049000004.90 !4.90 sq mi (12.7 km2) 2,762 feet (842 m) 1854 $52,770 Town is located on the Santa Clara Creek Tremonton Box Elder 6,789 &00000000000000052400005.24 !5.24 sq mi (13.6 km2) 4,325 feet (1,318 m) 1888 $44,784 [c] Providence Cache 6,538 &00000000000000028300002.83 !2.83 sq mi (7.3 km2) 4,596 feet (1,401 m) 1859 $56,129 [c] Salem Utah 6,435 &00000000000000053200005.32 !5.32 sq mi (13.8 km2) 4,610 feet (1,410 m) 1851 $54,813 Salem, Massachusetts[34] South Weber Davis 6,167 &00000000000000046299994.63 !4.63 sq mi (12.0 km2) 4,551 feet (1,387 m) 1851 $70,656 Located on the south side of the Weber River Harrisville Weber 6,060 &00000000000000027000002.70 !2.70 sq mi (7.0 km2) 4,291 feet (1,308 m) 1850 $51,289 Marin H. Harris, a settler of the area Hooper Weber 5,655 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 4,242 feet (1,293 m) [b] &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] William H. Hooper, Utah territorial delgate to the United States House of Representatives Nephi* Juab 5,408 &00000000000000041699994.17 !4.17 sq mi (10.8 km2) 5,128 feet (1,563 m) 1851 $38,918 Nephi, a prophet from the Book of Mormon West Bountiful Davis 5,337 &00000000000000029700002.97 !2.97 sq mi (7.7 km2) 4,268 feet (1,301 m) [b] $61,063 Located west of Bountiful Farr West Weber 5,335 &00000000000000058399995.84 !5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2) 4,265 feet (1,300 m) 1858 $41,618 Located west of Farr's Fort which was named after Lorin Farr, an early LDS Church stake president of the area. Fruit Heights Davis 5,312 &00000000000000022000002.20 !2.20 sq mi (5.7 km2) 4,698 feet (1,432 m) 1850[16] $79,192 Fruit orchards located above the valley floor Plain City Weber 5,288 &00000000000000037400003.74 !3.74 sq mi (9.7 km2) 4,242 feet (1,293 m) 1859 $57,601 Originally called City on the Plains Ephraim Sanpete 5,284 &00000000000000035699993.57 !3.57 sq mi (9.2 km2) 5,541 feet (1,689 m) 1854 $28,318 Tribe of Ephraim, one of the twelve Tribes of Israel. Moab* Grand 5,121 &00000000000000036400003.64 !3.64 sq mi (9.4 km2) 4,026 feet (1,227 m) 1855 $32,620 The Biblical name Moab or the Native American word for mosquito was "Moapa" Enoch Iron 5,085 &00000000000000033100003.31 !3.31 sq mi (8.6 km2) 5,545 feet (1,690 m) 1851 $37,368 Enoch, a biblical figure in the Old Testament Roosevelt Duchesne 5,025 &00000000000000052500005.25 !5.25 sq mi (13.6 km2) 5,095 feet (1,553 m) 1905 $29,190 Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States Sunset Davis 4,945 &00000000000000014700001.47 !1.47 sq mi (3.8 km2) 4,511 feet (1,375 m) [b] $41,726 Located on a ridge with views of the sunset over the Great Salt Lake La Verkin Washington 4,487 &000000000000001612999916.13 !16.13 sq mi (41.8 km2) 3,192 feet (973 m) 1897 $35,949 Derived from the Spanish La Virgen, referring to the local Virgin River Nibley Cache 4,410 &00000000000000033199993.32 !3.32 sq mi (8.6 km2) 4,554 feet (1,388 m) 1855[29] $52,273 Charles W. Nibley, a local leader of the LDS Church Hyde Park Cache 3,927 &00000000000000032000003.20 !3.20 sq mi (8.3 km2) 4,537 feet (1,383 m) 1860 $51,750 Wiliam Hyde, one of the first settlers and first LDS Church Bishop of the area Perry Box Elder 3,889 &00000000000000076699997.67 !7.67 sq mi (19.9 km2) 4,367 feet (1,331 m) 1853 $52,500 Lorenzo Perry, first LDS Church Bishop of the town Kanab* Kane 3,782 &000000000000001406000014.06 !14.06 sq mi (36.4 km2) 4,970 feet (1,510 m) 1864 $35,125 Native American word for willow, referring to the willows growing along the area's creeks Midway Wasatch 3,701 &00000000000000033500003.35 !3.35 sq mi (8.7 km2) 5,584 feet (1,702 m) 1859 $51,071 A fort was built mid-way between two settlements Morgan* Morgan 3,321 &00000000000000032000003.20 !3.20 sq mi (8.3 km2) 5,069 feet (1,545 m) 1860 $47,716 Jedediah Morgan Grant, father to LDS Church President Heber J. Grant Manti* Sanpete 3,312 &00000000000000019500001.95 !1.95 sq mi (5.1 km2) 5,610 feet (1,710 m) 1849 $32,844 A city from the Book of Mormon Blanding San Juan 3,290 &00000000000000023700002.37 !2.37 sq mi (6.1 km2) 6,106 feet (1,861 m) 1887 $32,991 Maiden name of Thomas W. Bicknell's wife, who donated 500 books to the library Wellsville Cache 3,259 &00000000000000063799996.38 !6.38 sq mi (16.5 km2) 4,547 feet (1,386 m) 1856 $49,115 Daniel H. Wells, LDS Church Apostle Delta Millard 3,172 &00000000000000037500003.75 !3.75 sq mi (9.7 km2) 4,639 feet (1,414 m) 1906 $37,773 The river delta of the Sevier River Gunnison Sanpete 3,016 &00000000000000052999995.30 !5.30 sq mi (13.7 km2) 5,138 feet (1,566 m) 1859 $33,147 Captain John W. Gunnison, explored and surveyed Great Salt Lake, Utah Lake and the Salt Lake Valley for the Corps of Topographical Engineers Mount Pleasant Sanpete 2,813 &00000000000000028199992.82 !2.82 sq mi (7.3 km2) 5,925 feet (1,806 m) 1852 $33,603 Pleasant view of the surrounding mountains Parowan* Iron 2,624 &00000000000000058399995.84 !5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2) 6,017 feet (1,834 m) 1851 $32,426 From the Native American words paragoons and pahoan, meaning "marsh people" Beaver* Beaver 2,597 &00000000000000045800004.58 !4.58 sq mi (11.9 km2) 5,902 feet (1,799 m) 1856 $33,646 Beaver River, a 242-mile (389 km) river that eventually disappears into the ground Elk Ridge Utah 2,476 &00000000000000027799992.78 !2.78 sq mi (7.2 km2) 5,354 feet (1,632 m) [b] $65,511 [c] Salina Sevier 2,414 &00000000000000061500006.15 !6.15 sq mi (15.9 km2) 5,161 feet (1,573 m) 1863 $34,886 Nearby salt deposits Richmond Cache 2,364 &00000000000000029500002.95 !2.95 sq mi (7.6 km2) 4,610 feet (1,410 m) 1859 $42,138 Rich fertile soil of the valley[31] Fillmore* Millard 2,136 &00000000000000057699995.77 !5.77 sq mi (14.9 km2) 5,135 feet (1,565 m) 1851 $31,719 Millard Fillmore, President of the United States Garland Box Elder 2,059 &00000000000000017700001.77 !1.77 sq mi (4.6 km2) 4,340 feet (1,320 m) 1890 $38,679 William Garland, led the construction of a canal in the area Huntington Emery 2,033 &00000000000000020299992.03 !2.03 sq mi (5.3 km2) 5,787 feet (1,764 m) 1877[21] $36,964 William Huntington, an early explorer of the area Lewiston Cache 2,030 &000000000000002567999925.68 !25.68 sq mi (66.5 km2) 4,508 feet (1,374 m) 1870 $36,417 William H. Lewis, a local LDS Bishop Monticello* San Juan 2,018 &00000000000000025899992.59 !2.59 sq mi (6.7 km2) 7,070 feet (2,150 m) 1879 $35,929 Monticello in Virginia, the home of Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States[27] Hildale Washington 1,970 &00000000000000029400002.94 !2.94 sq mi (7.6 km2) 5,409 feet (1,649 m) [b] $32,579 [c] Helper Carbon 1,876 &00000000000000017900001.79 !1.79 sq mi (4.6 km2) 5,817 feet (1,773 m) 1883 $30,052 The "Helper engines" or extra locomotives used to get trains over Soldier Summit from Helper to Spanish Fork Monroe Sevier 1,853 &00000000000000035400003.54 !3.54 sq mi (9.2 km2) 5,394 feet (1,644 m) 1863 $34,907 James Monroe, President of the United States Millville Cache 1,825 &00000000000000023500002.35 !2.35 sq mi (6.1 km2) 4,616 feet (1,407 m) 1860 $51,513 The first saw mill in Cache Valley was built in the area Woodland Hills Utah 1,747 &00000000000000027400002.74 !2.74 sq mi (7.1 km2) 5,331 feet (1,625 m) 1867 $80,854 Located at the base of canyon where groves of trees are located Willard Box Elder 1,747 &00000000000000072199997.22 !7.22 sq mi (18.7 km2) 4,350 feet (1,330 m) 1851 $52,150 Willard Richards, a LDS Church Apostle River Heights Cache 1707 &0000000000000000580000.58 !0.58 sq mi (1.5 km2) 4,580 feet (1,400 m) [b] $53,750 Located above the Logan River[33] Naples Uintah 1,694 &00000000000000065300006.53 !6.53 sq mi (16.9 km2) 5,230 feet (1,590 m) 1878 $43,158 Naples, Italy Enterprise Washington 1,636 &00000000000000029100002.91 !2.91 sq mi (7.5 km2) 5,318 feet (1,621 m) 1902 $35,694 Name reflected the first settlers' ability to adjust to problem experienced by the first settlers Wendover Tooele 1,632 &00000000000000064299996.43 !6.43 sq mi (16.7 km2) 4,291 feet (1,308 m) 1906 $31,196 [c] Duchesne* Duchesne 1,612 &00000000000000022999992.30 !2.30 sq mi (6.0 km2) 5,518 feet (1,682 m) 1904 $32,426 Nearby Fort Duchesne Castle Dale* Emery 1,582 &00000000000000018700001.87 !1.87 sq mi (4.8 km2) 5,676 feet (1,730 m) 1879[11] $44,185 Located in the Castle Valley, but a Postal Service mistake listed town as Castle Dale instead of Castle Vale. Wellington Carbon 1,571 &00000000000000035200003.52 !3.52 sq mi (9.1 km2) 5,413 feet (1,650 m) 1878 $36,979 Wellington Seeley Jr., Judge of the Emery County Court Ferron Emery 1,544 &00000000000000022299992.23 !2.23 sq mi (5.8 km2) 5,971 feet (1,820 m) 1877[15] $38,625 A. D. Ferron, surveyor of the area Marriot-Slaterville Weber 1,537 &00000000000000074599997.46 !7.46 sq mi (19.3 km2) 4,252 feet (1,296 m) 1849[25] $49,732 The towns of Marriott and Slaterville joined to form Marriott-Slaterville, they were named after early settlers John Marriott and Richard Slater Panguitch* Garfield 1,520 &00000000000000013600001.36 !1.36 sq mi (3.5 km2) 6,624 feet (2,019 m) 1866 $33,500 A Native American name for nearby Panguitch Lake meaning "water" and "fish" Kamas Summit 1,492 &00000000000000015900001.59 !1.59 sq mi (4.1 km2) 6,486 feet (1,977 m) 1857 $41,667 Derived from the Native American word for the Small Camas, an edible bulb found in the valley Mona Juab 1,402 &00000000000000014199991.42 !1.42 sq mi (3.7 km2) 4,970 feet (1,510 m) 1852 $49,464 Unknown[d] Milford Beaver 1,399 &00000000000000019299991.93 !1.93 sq mi (5.0 km2) 4,967 feet (1,514 m) 1873 $35,809 [c] Toquerville Washington 1,373 &000000000000001416000014.16 !14.16 sq mi (36.7 km2) 3,389 feet (1,033 m) 1858 $34,038 Native American Piute tribe leader Toquer Coalville Summit 1,367 &00000000000000032599993.26 !3.26 sq mi (8.4 km2) 5,577 feet (1,700 m) 1858 $39,342 Many of the miners came from Coalville, England Honeyville Box Elder 1,354 &000000000000001175000011.75 !11.75 sq mi (30.4 km2) 4,298 feet (1,310 m) 1861 $41,518 Profession of the local LDS Bishop Orangeville Emery 1,352 &00000000000000013000001.30 !1.30 sq mi (3.4 km2) 5,778 feet (1,761 m) 1878 $45,057 Orange Seely, a settler in the area Oakley Summit 1,327 &00000000000000062999996.30 !6.30 sq mi (16.3 km2) 6,434 feet (1,961 m) 1868 $61,250 The scrub oak species gambel oak found in the area Moroni Sanpete 1,327 &00000000000000010700001.07 !1.07 sq mi (2.8 km2) 5,531 feet (1,686 m) 1859 $32,375 Moroni, a prophet from the Book of Mormon Uintah Weber 1,258 &00000000000000010100001.01 !1.01 sq mi (2.6 km2) 4,537 feet (1,383 m) 1850 $52,300 Uintah band of the Ute tribe East Carbon Carbon 1,258 &00000000000000089399998.94 !8.94 sq mi (23.2 km2) 4,987 feet (1,520 m) 1922 $25,313 Coal deposits found in the area Fairview Sanpete 1,210 &00000000000000012500001.25 !1.25 sq mi (3.2 km2) 6,948 feet (2,118 m) 1859 $34,946 The attractive surroundings of the area Mendon Cache 1,190 &00000000000000012500001.25 !1.25 sq mi (3.2 km2) 4,495 feet (1,370 m) 1859[26] $46,563 LDS Church Apostle Ezra T. Benson named it after his birthplace of Mendon, Massachusetts Genola Utah 1,159 &000000000000001324000013.24 !13.24 sq mi (34.3 km2) 4,600 feet (1,400 m) [b] $45,417 [c] Centerfield Sanpete 1,096 &00000000000000018000001.80 !1.80 sq mi (4.7 km2) 5,098 feet (1,554 m) 1869 $35,357 Center of the Gunnison Valley Spring City Sanpete 1,044 &00000000000000013300001.33 !1.33 sq mi (3.4 km2) 5,823 feet (1,775 m) 1852 $34,609 The nearby springs Fountain Green Sanpete 978 &00000000000000014099991.41 !1.41 sq mi (3.7 km2) 5,899 feet (1,798 m) 1850 $36,078 Lush meadows surrounding the area's springs Aurora Sevier 952 &00000000000000010100001.01 !1.01 sq mi (2.6 km2) 5,200 feet (1,600 m) 1875 $44,911 Aurora, the Roman goddess of dawn Goshen Utah 934 &0000000000000000720000.72 !0.72 sq mi (1.9 km2) 4,551 feet (1,387 m) 1857 $41,458 Goshen, Connecticut, birthplace of Phineas W. Cooke, the first LDS Bishop of the area Green River Emery 923 &000000000000001264000012.64 !12.64 sq mi (32.7 km2) 4,078 feet (1,243 m) [b] $28,000 The Green River, a 730-mile (1,170 km) tributary of the Colorado River Paradise Cache 900 &00000000000000011100001.11 !1.11 sq mi (2.9 km2) 4,902 feet (1,494 m) 1860 $47,344 For the beautiful scenery Francis Summit 894 &00000000000000017900001.79 !1.79 sq mi (4.6 km2) 6,562 feet (2,000 m) 1869 $55,536 Francis M. Lyman, a LDS Church Apostle Elwood Box Elder 877 &00000000000000076799997.68 !7.68 sq mi (19.9 km2) 4,298 feet (1,310 m) 1879 $46,406 Postal Service named the town Levan Juab 864 &0000000000000000760000.76 !0.76 sq mi (2.0 km2) 5,315 feet (1,620 m) [b] $34,632 Unknown[d] Bear River City Box Elder 833 &00000000000000015700001.57 !1.57 sq mi (4.1 km2) 4,258 feet (1,298 m) 1866 $52,212 Bear River, a 350-mile (560 km) river and largest tributary of the Great Salt Lake Minersville Beaver 817 &0000000000000000630000.63 !0.63 sq mi (1.6 km2) 5,282 feet (1,610 m) 1859 $36,563 In honor of the miners who worked in the area Redmond Sevier 813 &0000000000000000990000.99 !0.99 sq mi (2.6 km2) 5,105 feet (1,556 m) 1875 $40,313 Red-colored mounds west of town Newton Cache 803 &0000000000000000760000.76 !0.76 sq mi (2.0 km2) 4,534 feet (1,382 m) 1869 $45,000 Originally called New Town, but the name was shortened Eureka Juab 796 &00000000000000014700001.47 !1.47 sq mi (3.8 km2) 6,430 feet (1,960 m) 1869 $36,875 Eureka is the ancient Greek name for "I have found it", relating to the gold mines found in the area Leeds Washington 764 &00000000000000020400002.04 !2.04 sq mi (5.3 km2) 3,481 feet (1,061 m) 1867 $41,250 Leeds, a town in England where many of the early settlers were from Escalante Garfield 763 &00000000000000029400002.94 !2.94 sq mi (7.6 km2) 5,820 feet (1,770 m) 1876 $32,143 Silvestre Vélez de Escalante, a Franciscan missionary who explored the area in 1776 Mantua Box Elder 756 &00000000000000055999995.60 !5.60 sq mi (14.5 km2) 5,200 feet (1,600 m) 1863 $60,234 LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow named it for his birthplace in Mantua, Ohio Clarkston Cache 754 &0000000000000000960000.96 !0.96 sq mi (2.5 km2) 4,879 feet (1,487 m) 1864 $40,592 Justus Clark, an original settler Elsinore Sevier 741 &00000000000000012600001.26 !1.26 sq mi (3.3 km2) 5,351 feet (1,631 m) 1874 $27,917 Elsinore, Denmark Hinckley Millard 708 &00000000000000050300005.03 !5.03 sq mi (13.0 km2) 4,603 feet (1,403 m) [b] $35,625 Ira Hinckley, LDS Church stake president of the local LDS stake Ballard Uintah 689 &000000000000001400000014.00 !14.00 sq mi (36.3 km2) 5,049 feet (1,539 m) [b] $35,278 Melvin J. Ballard, a LDS Church Apostle Henefer Summit 680 &0000000000000000860000.86 !0.86 sq mi (2.2 km2) 5,335 feet (1,626 m) 1859 $43,125 Brothers James and Richard Henefer, original settlers of the area Corinne Box Elder 677 &00000000000000036600003.66 !3.66 sq mi (9.5 km2) 4,226 feet (1,288 m) 1869 $42,125 Corinne, the first child born in the area Huntsville Weber 653 &0000000000000000740000.74 !0.74 sq mi (1.9 km2) 4,928 feet (1,502 m) 1860[22] $50,625 Jefferson Hunt, an early settler of the area Oak City Millard 606 &0000000000000000670000.67 !0.67 sq mi (1.7 km2) 5,112 feet (1,558 m) 1868 $47,375 Sits adjacent to Oak Creek Orderville Kane 603 &00000000000000091799999.18 !9.18 sq mi (23.8 km2) 5,449 feet (1,661 m) 1875 $35,769 The United Order, a collectivism movement of the LDS Church Rush Valley Tooele 602 &000000000000001832999918.33 !18.33 sq mi (47.5 km2) 5,043 feet (1,537 m) 1856 $46,875 Nearby Rush Lake Daniel Wasatch 600 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 5,715 feet (1,742 m) 1874 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] Aaron Daniels, one of the first settlers Myton Duchesne 597 &00000000000000010100001.01 !1.01 sq mi (2.6 km2) 5,085 feet (1,550 m) 1905[28] $23,472 Major H. P. Myton of the U.S. Army Stockton Tooele 580 &0000000000000000940000.94 !0.94 sq mi (2.4 km2) 5,118 feet (1,560 m) [b] $40,938 Stockton, California where many of the soldiers who settled the area where from Springdale Washington 579 &00000000000000046299994.63 !4.63 sq mi (12.0 km2) 3,898 feet (1,188 m) 1862 $41,607 The nearby springs Virgin Washington 555 &000000000000001191999911.92 !11.92 sq mi (30.9 km2) 3,606 feet (1,099 m) 1857 $36,953 The nearby Virgin River Rocky Ridge Juab 526 &00000000000000018799991.88 !1.88 sq mi (4.9 km2) 4,990 feet (1,520 m) [b] $31,944 [c] Loa* Wayne 516 &0000000000000000880000.88 !0.88 sq mi (2.3 km2) 7,064 feet (2,153 m) 1878 $33,750 Mauna Loa, a volcano in Hawaii, an early settler had served his LDS mission in Hawaii Trenton Cache 510 &00000000000000073399997.34 !7.34 sq mi (19.0 km2) 4,462 feet (1,360 m) 1870 $31,250 Trenton, New Jersey, hometown of the area's first LDS Bishop Cleveland Emery 508 &0000000000000000890000.89 !0.89 sq mi (2.3 km2) 5,722 feet (1,744 m) 1885 $33,500 Grover Cleveland, President of the United States Randolph* Rich 489 &00000000000000010400001.04 !1.04 sq mi (2.7 km2) 6,283 feet (1,915 m) 1870 $34,792 Randolph Stewart, an early settler and first LDS Church Bishop of the area Circleville Piute 485 &00000000000000090700009.07 !9.07 sq mi (23.5 km2) 6,066 feet (1,849 m) 1864 $32,083 Located in the Circle Valley Amalga Cache 480 &00000000000000035200003.52 !3.52 sq mi (9.1 km2) 4,439 feet (1,353 m) 1860 $42,143 Amalgamated Sugar Company Annabella Sevier 480 &0000000000000000560000.56 !0.56 sq mi (1.5 km2) 529 feet (161 m) 1871 $40,000 Composite name of Ann S. Roberts and Isabella Dalton, woman settlers of Annabella Paragonah Iron 478 &0000000000000000580000.58 !0.58 sq mi (1.5 km2) 5,879 feet (1,792 m) 1851 $33,958 Native American name for the nearby Little Salt Lake that means "marshland" Tropic Garfield 476 &00000000000000084000008.40 !8.40 sq mi (21.8 km2) 6,309 feet (1,923 m) [b] $42,500 The area had a milder climate than where the settlers originally came from Kanosh Millard 470 &0000000000000000850000.85 !0.85 sq mi (2.2 km2) 5,020 feet (1,530 m) 1854 $32,411 Kanosh, the name for the local Native American leader Garden City Rich 460 &00000000000000045000004.50 !4.50 sq mi (11.7 km2) 5,968 feet (1,819 m) 1877[17] $40,750 Site was considered the garden spot of the valley Charleston Wasatch 457 &00000000000000018700001.87 !1.87 sq mi (4.8 km2) 5,440 feet (1,660 m) 1852 $42,813 Charles Shelton, who surveyed the town Apple Valley Washington 447 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 4,941 feet (1,506 m) [b] &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] [c] Mayfield Sanpete 440 &0000000000000000840000.84 !0.84 sq mi (2.2 km2) 5,538 feet (1,688 m) 1871 $41,500 The wild flowers that appeared in the spring Glenwood Sevier 438 &0000000000000000540000.54 !0.54 sq mi (1.4 km2) 5,272 feet (1,607 m) 1863 $45,192 Robert Wilson Glenn, an early settler of the area Sigurd Sevier 432 &00000000000000010500001.05 !1.05 sq mi (2.7 km2) 5,226 feet (1,593 m) 1874 $32,813 Sigurd, The Danish residents named the town after the Norse mythological hero Fielding Box Elder 422 &0000000000000000440000.44 !0.44 sq mi (1.1 km2) 4,373 feet (1,333 m) 1892 $44,000 Mother of LDS Church President Joseph Fielding Smith Central Valley Sevier 415 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 5,305 feet (1,617 m) [b] &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] [c] Cedar Fort Utah 410 &00000000000000015900001.59 !1.59 sq mi (4.1 km2) 5,085 feet (1,550 m) 1856 $44,773 Large number of cedar trees in the area Big Water Kane 406 &00000000000000060700006.07 !6.07 sq mi (15.7 km2) 4,108 feet (1,252 m) 1958[10] $30,278 [c] Castle Valley Grand 386 &00000000000000080800008.08 !8.08 sq mi (20.9 km2) 4,685 feet (1,428 m) 1974[12] $33,068 Located in the Castle Valley Sunnyside Carbon 377 &00000000000000031400003.14 !3.14 sq mi (8.1 km2) 6,414 feet (1,955 m) 1912 $32,955 The coal mine located on the sunny side of the valley Alta Salt Lake 374 &00000000000000040499994.05 !4.05 sq mi (10.5 km2) 8,560 feet (2,610 m) 1866 $51,250 Spanish word for "high" due to Alta's elevation Holden Millard 372 &0000000000000000550000.55 !0.55 sq mi (1.4 km2) 5,102 feet (1,555 m) 1855 $34,000 Elijah E. Holden, an early settler of the area Plymouth Box Elder 364 &0000000000000000540000.54 !0.54 sq mi (1.4 km2) 4,488 feet (1,368 m) 1869 $41,250 A large rock in the area resembled Plymouth Rock Elmo Emery 363 &0000000000000000620000.62 !0.62 sq mi (1.6 km2) 5,692 feet (1,735 m) 1908 $33,750 St. Elmo, an 1866 novel by the author Augusta Jane Evans Marysvale Piute 352 &000000000000001510999915.11 !15.11 sq mi (39.1 km2) 5,863 feet (1,787 m) 1863 $31,875 Unknown[d] Bicknell Wayne 347 &0000000000000000470000.47 !0.47 sq mi (1.2 km2) 7,123 feet (2,171 m) 1879 $32,750 Thomas W. Bicknell, who donated 500 books to the library Glendale Kane 339 &00000000000000078099997.81 !7.81 sq mi (20.2 km2) 5,778 feet (1,761 m) 1862 $35,938 The place being in a glen or a narrow valley with mountains all around[18] Deweyville Box Elder 334 &00000000000000064500006.45 !6.45 sq mi (16.7 km2) 4,437 feet (1,352 m) 1864 $43,750 John C. Dewey, an early settler to the area Manila* Daggett 324 &0000000000000000810000.81 !0.81 sq mi (2.1 km2) 6,348 feet (1,935 m) 1898 $26,458 Commemorate the Spanish-American War victory over the Spanish fleet in the Philippines at Manila Kanarraville Iron 315 &0000000000000000450000.45 !0.45 sq mi (1.2 km2) 5,541 feet (1,689 m) 1861 $34,375 Chief Canarrah, local leader of the Piute tribe Vernon Tooele 313 &00000000000000075199997.52 !7.52 sq mi (19.5 km2) 5,515 feet (1,681 m) 1862 $42,500 Joseph Vernon, a local settler that was killed by Native Americans Wallsburg Wasatch 305 &0000000000000000500000.50 !0.50 sq mi (1.3 km2) 5,676 feet (1,730 m) 1861[38] $55,313 William Madison Wall, local settler and explorer Scipio Millard 298 &0000000000000000850000.85 !0.85 sq mi (2.2 km2) 5,315 feet (1,620 m) 1859 $30,277 Scipio Kenner, a settler of the area Emery Emery 295 &00000000000000012099991.21 !1.21 sq mi (3.1 km2) 6,253 feet (1,906 m) 1881[14] $40,469 George W. Emery, territorial Governor of Utah Koosharem Sevier 292 &0000000000000000560000.56 !0.56 sq mi (1.5 km2) 6,919 feet (2,109 m) 1877 $34,583 Native American word for an edible tuber that grows in the area Cornish Cache 285 &00000000000000048499994.85 !4.85 sq mi (12.6 km2) 4,485 feet (1,367 m) [b] $40,417 William D Cornish, vice-president of the Union Pacific Railroad Portage Box Elder 276 &00000000000000022799992.28 !2.28 sq mi (5.9 km2) 4,367 feet (1,331 m) 1867 $43,125 Portage County, Ohio, the birthplace of LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow[30] Sterling Sanpete 274 &0000000000000000240000.24 !0.24 sq mi (0.62 km2) 5,574 feet (1,699 m) 1873 $27,019 The "sterling" qualities of its people Joseph Seiver 273 &0000000000000000890000.89 !0.89 sq mi (2.3 km2) 5,436 feet (1,657 m) 1871 $29,375 Joseph A. Young, first LDS Church stake president of the Sevier Stake Rockville Washington 264 &00000000000000084199998.42 !8.42 sq mi (21.8 km2) 3,740 feet (1,140 m) 1860 $37,917 After the rocky soil of the area Howell Box Elder 245 &000000000000003560000035.60 !35.60 sq mi (92.2 km2) 4,560 feet (1,390 m) 1910 $40,750 Joseph Howell, president of the surveying company that laid out the area and Representative of the United State House of Representatives from Utah Meadow Millard 237 &0000000000000000500000.50 !0.50 sq mi (1.3 km2) 4,839 feet (1,475 m) 1857 $26,250 The adjacent Meadow Creek Wales Sanpete 234 &0000000000000000300000.30 !0.30 sq mi (0.78 km2) 5,627 feet (1,715 m) 1857[37] $35,313 Local settlers originally came from Wales Lyman Wayne 230 &00000000000000018899991.89 !1.89 sq mi (4.9 km2) 7,182 feet (2,189 m) [b] $36,607 Francis M. Lyman, a LDS Church Apostle Fayette Sanpete 211 &0000000000000000480000.48 !0.48 sq mi (1.2 km2) 5,052 feet (1,540 m) 1861 $28,750 Fayette, New York, where the LDS Church was organized Leamington Millard 206 &00000000000000015700001.57 !1.57 sq mi (4.1 km2) 4,731 feet (1,442 m) 1871 $43,125 Leamington Hastings, a town in England Hanksville Wayne 204 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 4,291 feet (1,308 m) 1882 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] Ebeneazer Hanks, original settler of the area Woodruff Rich 198 &0000000000000000540000.54 !0.54 sq mi (1.4 km2) 6,339 feet (1,932 m) 1865 $43,000 Wilford Woodruff, LDS Church President New Harmony Washington 194 &0000000000000000400000.40 !0.40 sq mi (1.0 km2) 5,305 feet (1,617 m) [b] $34,583 Harmony, Pennsylvania, where Joseph Smith translated the Book of Mormon Altamont Duchesne 194 &0000000000000000160000.16 !0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2) 6,388 feet (1,947 m) [b] $28,750 Composite name of nearby peaks Altonah and Mt. Emmons Laketown Rich 191 &00000000000000010100001.01 !1.01 sq mi (2.6 km2) 5,974 feet (1,821 m) 1864 $60,893 Town is located next to Bear Lake, a 109-square-mile (280 km2) lake on the Utah-Idaho border Torrey Wayne 191 &0000000000000000390000.39 !0.39 sq mi (1.0 km2) 6,837 feet (2,084 m) [b] $25,859 Colonel Torrey, a veteran of the Spanish-American War Boulder Garfield 186 &000000000000002092000020.92 !20.92 sq mi (54.2 km2) 6,703 feet (2,043 m) 1889 $30,000 Boulder Mountain, a 11,317-foot (3,449 m) mountain located in the Dixie National Forest Clawson Emery 173 &0000000000000000540000.54 !0.54 sq mi (1.4 km2) 5,942 feet (1,811 m) 1897 $31,250 Rudger Clawson, a LDS Church Apostle Junction* Piute 171 &000000000000001496000014.96 !14.96 sq mi (38.7 km2) 6,007 feet (1,831 m) 1880 $25,625 Located at the junction of the East Fork and the Sevier Rivers Snowville Box Elder 164 &00000000000000015300001.53 !1.53 sq mi (4.0 km2) 4,547 feet (1,386 m) 1871 $24,375 Lorenzo Snow, LDS Church President[35] Tabiona Duchesne 163 &0000000000000000130000.13 !0.13 sq mi (0.34 km2) 6,516 feet (1,986 m) 1860 $28,750 Originally called Tabby and Tabbyville referring to Ute tribe leader Tava who's nickname was Tabby Fairfield Utah 151 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 4,877 feet (1,487 m) 1855 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] Amos Fielding, an early settler of the area Vineyard Utah 148 &00000000000000044199994.42 !4.42 sq mi (11.4 km2) 4,557 feet (1,389 m) [b] $55,313 The grape vines that were planted in the area Henrieville Garfield 148 &0000000000000000170000.17 !0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2) 5,997 feet (1,828 m) 1878 $28,500 James Henrie, first stake president of the local LDS stake Alton Kane 140 &0000000000000000370000.37 !0.37 sq mi (0.96 km2) 7,041 feet (2,146 m) [b] $30,883 Alton Fjord in Norway Cannonville Garfield 138 &00000000000000012299991.23 !1.23 sq mi (3.2 km2) 5,886 feet (1,794 m) 1874 $28,750 George Q. Cannon, a LDS Church Apostle Kingston Piute 136 &00000000000000053200005.32 !5.32 sq mi (13.8 km2) 6,017 feet (1,834 m) 1876 $23,750 Thomas R. King, the area's first settler Brian Head Iron 127 &00000000000000031000003.10 !3.10 sq mi (8.0 km2) 9,800 feet (3,000 m) [b] $44,063 William Jennings Bryan, national politician and former candidate for President of the United States Lynndyl Millard 120 &00000000000000035099993.51 !3.51 sq mi (9.1 km2) 4,787 feet (1,459 m) 1907 $35,625 Unknown[d] Hatch Garfield 118 &0000000000000000270000.27 !0.27 sq mi (0.70 km2) 6,919 feet (2,109 m) 1872[19] $37,083 Meltiar Harch Sr., a settler of the area Antimony Garfield 114 &000000000000001011999910.12 !10.12 sq mi (26.2 km2) 6,453 feet (1,967 m) 1873 $22,500 The metal antimony that was mined in the area Bryce Canyon City Garfield 59 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] 7,664 feet (2,336 m) 1875 &00000000000000000000000 !N/A[a] Local homsteader Ebenezer Bryce Ophir Tooele 28 &0000000000000000160000.16 !0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2) 6,496 feet (1,980 m) [b] $50,000 The Ophir Gold Mine that was located in the area Scofield Carbon 26 &0000000000000000500000.50 !0.50 sq mi (1.3 km2) 7,739 feet (2,359 m) 1879 $26,250 General Charles W. Scofield, a local mine official
16 Nov 2010
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0:55
Preowned Honda CR-V for sale at Poughkeepsie Nissan located in Wappingers Falls, NY. Poughkeepsie Nissan's Certified Used Car Outlet has the largest indoor show room in the Hudson Valley. We have the cars you want. Financing available.
24 Dec 2010
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*******www.home-and-bedroom****/fbg-hudson-daybed-trundle.html The Hudson Daybed Trundle goes well with any room, be it the second Bedroom, office or a living room. It has an Espresso finish. The Hudson Trundle comes with a Link Spring and a Pop Up Trundle. Visit *******www.home-and-bedroom****/fbgdaybed.html for more daybeds like this.
4 Feb 2011
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BY TARA GRIMES You're watching multisource U.S. news analysis from Newsy. YNN: “It has been a very emotional day here in Spring Valley, family and friends gathering to say their goodbyes to the three Pierre children. About 60 people attended the funeral service. It was a small one, but one filled with a great deal of tension.” Tension – it’s the word news outlets are using to describe the funeral of the three children who drowned when their mother, LaShanda Armstrong, intentionally drove into the Hudson River. ABC: “Losing patience from being put off, funeral staff constantly checked lists of names of who was invited, who was to enter when and when – keeping the families apart. Tension, on top of unbearable pain both families are suffering.” Reuters reports it was the father Jean Pierre’s decision to bury the children separate from their mother that created a divide between the families. According to New York Daily News, Armstrong’s family believes Pierre was cheating- and Armstrong’s aunt blames him for the tension. “I am very angry. This jackass just came in here and messed everything up. She should be buried with her children, regardless of what she did.” It’s a view many media outlets are taking, calling for Pierre to take responsibility for the tragedy. In an opinion piece for Milwaukee’s Journal Sentinel, a reporter points out Armstrong had a history of domestic problems with Pierre, including the day of the murder/suicide. He writes, “Pierre said he has been ‘inaccurately portrayed as being directly responsible for the tragedy.’ He may not be directly responsible, but if he was violent to Armstrong, then he should share some of the blame.” The New York Times reports Pierre pushed tensions further when he limited access to the funeral for Armstrong’s side of the family. “Ms. Green, a cousin of Ms. Armstrong, said Mr. Pierre had limited the number of Ms. Armstrong’s relatives who could attend the funeral and asked them to show identification at the door. She said she had been ejected out after she went to assist her 17-year-old son, who she said was being ‘manhandled.’” What do you think? Should the mother been allowed to be buried with her children or it is right they were kept apart? Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
30 Apr 2011
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