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2:45
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
18
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2:21
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
20
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2:12
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
16
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1:30
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
21
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2:33
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
21
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2:18
You and Your Joints A joint is the connection between two bones. Joints and their surrounding structures allow you to bend your elbows and knees, wiggle your hips, bend your back, turn your head, and wave your fingers to say bye-bye. Smooth tissue called cartilage and synovium and a lubricant called synovial fluid cushion the joints so bones do not rub together. But increasing age, injury -- even sitting the wrong way or carrying too much weight -- can wear and tear your cartilage. This can lead to a reaction that can damage your joints and lead to arthritis. The best way to care for your joints is to keep them and your muscles, ligaments, and bones strong and stable. Here are some tips for good joint health. Watch Your Weight for Healthy Joints Keeping your weight within a healthy range is the best thing you can do for your joints. Weight-bearing joints, such as your knees, hips, and back, have to support some, if not all, of your body weight. That's why so many overweight people have problems with these areas of the body. The higher the number on your bathroom scale, the more wear and tear you put on your joints. Losing weight reduces pressure on your knees, hips, and back and helps prevent joint injury. Research has shown that with every pound gained, a person puts four times more stress on the knees. Exercise for Healthy Joints Exercise can help you lose extra pounds and maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests that aerobic exercise -- activities that get your heart rate up -- can reduce joint swelling. If your joints bother you, opt for exercises that won't give your joints a pounding. Instead of step aerobics, try low-impact exercises such as swimming or bicycling. Another healthy idea: Don't sit still! Couch potatoes, computer addicts, and all who remain glued to a chair all day long have a high risk for joint pain. Less movement means more stiffness in your joints. So get up and get moving. Change positions frequently. Take frequent breaks a
10 May 2017
15
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4:07
DeanHow to use a small piece of tissue to clean your ass
23 Mar 2007
46740
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2:13
Burning tissue paper.... I was bored, nobody was home, why not? :P
16 May 2007
1620
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7:14
Scar Tissue blasted on to the music scene with their 1998 release of Californication. The mellow RHCP sound is archieved by some great guitar work from John Frusciante. For more lessons, visit *******www.jamplay****/.
21 Jun 2007
22574
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3:00
Deep tissue massage techniques explained
25 Jun 2007
638625
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0:32
Me Levitating a Tissue
23 Jul 2007
482
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2:58
Tork Revolution Wages War on Germs and Napkin Hoarders with Humor and Prizes SCA Tissue is starting a revolution in the North American sanitary paper industry and doing it with style and humor. On Oct. 1, the third-largest sanitary tissue maker in North America will officially launch the Tork® Revolution – a major realignment of its products and services under the global Tork brand. After benchmarking 400 competitive products and listening closely to distributors and end-customers, the Tork Revolution will shake up the stodgy away-from-home sanitary paper industry with bold new products, a simplified architecture of three quality tiers and the elimination of redundancies to reduce the total number of SKUs. All of the changes are designed to make life easier for distributors and end-user customers.
10 Sep 2007
444
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1:36
Cullen’s abc’s (*******www.cullensabcs****) creates free preschool videos to support children’s development at home and in the classroom. For preschoolers a great art and science activity! Lot's of small motor skills are involved with brushing and placing tissue paper. The reaction from the tissue paper and vinegar is the exciting science element of the activity. Art gives your child a chance to express themselves through their imagination. Art allows children to explore and understand their world through creative experiences that emphasize the process of art, not the product. When your child is creating there is no right or wrong way, only their way. (Art instruction does not have specific guidelines for children to follow like a craft.) Art allows your child to be free in their creative mind.
27 Oct 2007
2806
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0:52
Dr. Gertes performed a trick where he burned a tissue paper and magically restored it to its original form.
14 Nov 2007
262
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1:36
My kittens and their tissue box
13 Dec 2007
359
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2:26
Create a springy tissue box that automatically feeds the tissues to you. No fancy mechanics or metal, all you need is a box is tissues!
15 Dec 2007
427
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