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Upper Dolpo trekking is remote hidden trekking destination in Nepal. Upper Dolpo Trekking is known as Ancient Buddhist Lands, most tranquil and natural beauty.
2 Apr 2017
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We offer Upper dolpo to jomsom Trekking, Upper dolpo to jomsom Trek, Trekking in Upper dolpo to jomsom , Upper dolpo to jomsom Trekking Information, Upper dolpo to jomsom Trek Info, Upper dolpo to jomsom Trek Information, Upper dolpo to jomsom Trekking I
2 Apr 2017
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Trekking in Upper Mustang Trekking is a rare and privileged opportunity. Upper Mustang Trekking is a mystic land in the rain shadow area of Nepal.
3 Apr 2017
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We offer Special Upper Dolpo Trekking with full Information. For more Upper Dolpo Trekking details and cost please contact us.
11 Apr 2017
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We offer Special Upper Mustang Trekking with full Information. For more Upper Mustang Trekking details and cost please contact us.
13 Apr 2017
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The most common symptom of cholecystitis is pain in your upper right abdomen that can sometimes move around to your back or right shoulder blade. Other symptoms include: * Nausea or vomiting. * Tenderness in the right abdomen. * Fever. * Pain that gets worse during a deep breath. * Pain for more than 6 hours, particularly after meals. * Pain in the upper tummy (abdomen) - the main symptom. It is usually worse on the right side under the ribs. The pain may radiate (travel) to the back or to the right shoulder. The pain tends to be worse if you breathe in deeply. Older people may not have fever or pain. Their only symptom may be a tender area in the abdomen. When to see a doctor Make an appointment with your doctor if you have worrisome signs or symptoms. For abdominal pain so severe you can't sit still or get comfortable, have someone drive you to the emergency room.
31 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Gorham's disease is a rare bone disorder characterized by bone loss (osteolysis), often associated abnormal blood vessel growth (angiomatous proliferation). Bone loss can occur in just one bone, or spread to soft tissue and adjacent bones. Symtoms may include pain, swelling, and increased risk of fracture.[1] It may affect any part of the skeleton, but most commonly involves the skull, collarbone (clavicle), pelvis, ribs, spine, and/or jaw. Depending on the bones affected, various complications may occur. The cause of Gorham's disease is currently unknown. Most cases occur sporadically. Treatment is based on the signs and symptoms in each affected person, and most commonly involves surgery and/or radiation therapy. In some cases, Gorham's disease improves without treatment (spontaneous remission). Gorham’s (GOR-amz) disease is a very rare skeletal condition of uncertain etiology, characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of distended, thin-walled vascular or lymphatic channels within bone, which leads to resorption and replacement of bone with angiomas and/or fibrosis. Because of the loss of the affected bone, the condition has been referred to as disappearing bone disease, vanishing bone disease, and massive osteolysis. In medical terminology osteolysis means: bone (osteo) breaking down or destruction (lysis). The first known report of the condition came in 1838 in an article titled “A Boneless Arm” in what was then The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, now The New England Journal of Medicine. It is a brief but fascinating report chronicling the case of Mr. Brown who had, in 1819 at age 18 years, broken his right upper arm in an accident. The patient suffered two subsequent accidents, which fractured the arm twice more “before the curative process had been completed.” At the time of the report in 1838 the patient was reported as having remarkable use of the arm, in spite of the humerus bone having....
3 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Liver disease is any disturbance of liver function that causes illness. The liver is responsible for many critical functions within the body and should it become diseased or injured, the loss of those functions can cause significant damage to the body. Liver disease is also referred to as hepatic disease. Liver disease is a broad term that covers all the potential problems that cause the liver to fail to perform its designated functions. Usually, more than 75% or three quarters of liver tissue needs to be affected before a decrease in function occurs. The liver is the largest solid organ in the body; and is also considered a gland because among its many functions, it makes and secretes bile. The liver is located in the upper right portion of the abdomen protected by the rib cage. It has two main lobes that are made up of tiny lobules. The liver cells have two different sources of blood supply. The hepatic artery supplies oxygen rich blood that is pumped from the heart, while the portal vein supplies nutrients from the intestine and the spleen. Normally, veins return blood from the body to the heart, but the portal vein allows nutrients and chemicals from the digestive tract to enter the liver for processing and filtering prior to entering the general circulation. The portal vein also efficiently delivers the chemicals and proteins that liver cells need to produce the proteins, cholesterol, and glycogen required for normal body activities. As part of its function, the liver makes bile, a fluid that contains among other substances, water, chemicals, and bile acids (made from stored cholesterol in the liver). Bile is stored in the gallbladder and when food enters the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine), bile is secreted into the duodenum, to aid in the digestion of food. The liver is the only organ in the body that can easily replace damaged cells, but if enough cells are lost, the liver may not
9 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What Is Lymph Node Inflammation? Lymph nodes, or lymph glands, are small, oval-shaped organs that contain immune cells to attack and kill foreign invaders, such as viruses. They are an important part of the body’s immune system. Lymph nodes are found in various parts of the body, including the neck, armpits, and groin. They are linked by lymphatic vessels, which carry lymph a clear fluid containing white blood cells and dead and diseased tissue for disposal throughout the body. The primary function of lymph nodes is to harbor the body’s disease-fighting cells. When you are sick and your lymph nodes send out disease-fighting cells and compounds, they may become inflamed or painful. The condition of having inflamed lymph nodes is referred to as lymphadenitis. Lymph node inflammation can occur for a variety of reasons. Any infection or virus, including the common cold, can cause your lymph nodes to swell. Cancer–including blood cancer–can also cause lymph node inflammation. What Are the Symptoms of Lymph Node Inflammation? Lymph node inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the cause of the swelling and the location of the swollen lymph nodes. Common symptoms accompanying lymph node inflammation include: upper respiratory symptoms, such as a fever, runny nose, or sore throat tender, swollen lymph glands in the neck, armpits, and groin limb swelling could indicate lymph system blockage night sweats hardening and expansion of the lymph nodes could indicate the presence of a tumor
13 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep bodily fluid levels in balance and defends the body against infections. The lymphatic system is made up of a network of lymphatic vessels. These vessels carry lymph — a clear, watery fluid containing protein molecules, salts, glucose, urea, and other substances throughout the body. The spleen is located in the upper left part of the abdomen under the ribcage. It works as part of the lymphatic system to protect the body, clearing worn-out red blood cells and other foreign bodies from the bloodstream to help fight off infection. Why They're Important One of the lymphatic system's major jobs is to collect extra lymph fluid from body tissues and return it to the blood. This process is important because water, proteins, and other substances are continuously leaking out of tiny blood capillaries into the surrounding body tissues. If the lymphatic system didn't drain the excess fluid, it would build up in the body's tissues and they would swell. The lymphatic system also helps defend the body against germs like viruses, bacteria, and fungi that can cause illnesses. Those germs are filtered out in the lymph nodes, which are small masses of tissue located along the network of lymph vessels. The nodes house lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Some of those lymphocytes make antibodies, special proteins that fight off germs and stop infections from spreading by trapping disease-causing germs and destroying them. The spleen also helps the body fight infection. The spleen contains lymphocytes and another kind of white blood cell called macrophages, which engulf and destroy bacteria, dead tissue, and foreign matter and remove them from the blood passing through the spleen. The lymphatic system is a network of very small tubes vessels that drain lymph fluid from all over the body. The major parts of the lymph tissue are located in the bone marrow, spleen,
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Carrying Away Waste Lymph fluid drains into tiny vessels called lymph capillaries. The fluid is then pushed along through the capillaries when a person breathes or the muscles contract. The lymph capillaries are very thin. They have many tiny openings that let gases, water, and nutrients pass through to the surrounding cells, nourishing them and taking away waste products. When lymph fluid passes through in this way it is called interstitial fluid. Lymph vessels collect the interstitial fluid and then return it to the bloodstream by emptying it into large veins in the upper chest, near the neck. Fighting Infection Lymph fluid enters the lymph nodes, where macrophages fight off foreign bodies like bacteria, removing them from the bloodstream. After these substances have been filtered out, the lymph fluid leaves the lymph nodes and returns to the veins, where it re-enters the bloodstream. When a person has an infection, germs collect in the lymph nodes. If the throat is infected, for example, the lymph nodes of the neck may swell. That's why doctors check for swollen lymph nodes sometime called swollen glands but they're actually lymph nodes in the neck when your throat is infected.
17 Apr 2017
11
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1:59
soyoungplus net Prostate Health & Disease The prostate gland has an important job: it produces a thick, milky-white fluid that becomes part of the semen, the liquid ejaculated during sexual activity. The gland isn't big—about the size of a walnut or golf ball—but its location virtually guarantees problems if something goes awry. The prostate gland is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It also wraps around the upper part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. That means prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate is prone to three main conditions: Prostatitis: infection or inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis can cause burning or painful urination, the urgent need to urinate, trouble urinating, difficult or painful ejaculation, and pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (known as the perineum) or in the lower back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: aging-related enlargement of the prostate gland. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can make the prostate compress the urethra and slow or even stop the flow of urine, in much the same way that bending a garden hose chokes off the flow of water. BPH affects about three-quarters of men over age 60. Prostate cancer: the growth of cancerous cells inside the prostate, which may break out of the gland and affect other parts of the body. In the United States, about 1 man in 7 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. It occurs mainly in older men.
18 Apr 2017
3
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2:03
soyoungplus net Prostate Health & Disease The prostate gland has an important job: it produces a thick, milky-white fluid that becomes part of the semen, the liquid ejaculated during sexual activity. The gland isn't big—about the size of a walnut or golf ball—but its location virtually guarantees problems if something goes awry. The prostate gland is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It also wraps around the upper part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. That means prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate is prone to three main conditions: Prostatitis: infection or inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis can cause burning or painful urination, the urgent need to urinate, trouble urinating, difficult or painful ejaculation, and pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (known as the perineum) or in the lower back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: aging-related enlargement of the prostate gland. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can make the prostate compress the urethra and slow or even stop the flow of urine, in much the same way that bending a garden hose chokes off the flow of water. BPH affects about three-quarters of men over age 60. Prostate cancer: the growth of cancerous cells inside the prostate, which may break out of the gland and affect other parts of the body. In the United States, about 1 man in 7 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. It occurs mainly in older men.
18 Apr 2017
3
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2:12
soyoungplus net Prostate Health & Disease The prostate gland has an important job: it produces a thick, milky-white fluid that becomes part of the semen, the liquid ejaculated during sexual activity. The gland isn't big—about the size of a walnut or golf ball—but its location virtually guarantees problems if something goes awry. The prostate gland is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It also wraps around the upper part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. That means prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate is prone to three main conditions: Prostatitis: infection or inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis can cause burning or painful urination, the urgent need to urinate, trouble urinating, difficult or painful ejaculation, and pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (known as the perineum) or in the lower back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: aging-related enlargement of the prostate gland. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can make the prostate compress the urethra and slow or even stop the flow of urine, in much the same way that bending a garden hose chokes off the flow of water. BPH affects about three-quarters of men over age 60. Prostate cancer: the growth of cancerous cells inside the prostate, which may break out of the gland and affect other parts of the body. In the United States, about 1 man in 7 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. It occurs mainly in older men.
18 Apr 2017
10
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1:54
soyoungplus net Prostate Health & Disease The prostate gland has an important job: it produces a thick, milky-white fluid that becomes part of the semen, the liquid ejaculated during sexual activity. The gland isn't big—about the size of a walnut or golf ball—but its location virtually guarantees problems if something goes awry. The prostate gland is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It also wraps around the upper part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. That means prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate is prone to three main conditions: Prostatitis: infection or inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis can cause burning or painful urination, the urgent need to urinate, trouble urinating, difficult or painful ejaculation, and pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (known as the perineum) or in the lower back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: aging-related enlargement of the prostate gland. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can make the prostate compress the urethra and slow or even stop the flow of urine, in much the same way that bending a garden hose chokes off the flow of water. BPH affects about three-quarters of men over age 60. Prostate cancer: the growth of cancerous cells inside the prostate, which may break out of the gland and affect other parts of the body. In the United States, about 1 man in 7 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. It occurs mainly in older men.
18 Apr 2017
3
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2:13
soyoungplus net Prostate Health & Disease The prostate gland has an important job: it produces a thick, milky-white fluid that becomes part of the semen, the liquid ejaculated during sexual activity. The gland isn't big—about the size of a walnut or golf ball—but its location virtually guarantees problems if something goes awry. The prostate gland is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It also wraps around the upper part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. That means prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate is prone to three main conditions: Prostatitis: infection or inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis can cause burning or painful urination, the urgent need to urinate, trouble urinating, difficult or painful ejaculation, and pain in the area between the scrotum and rectum (known as the perineum) or in the lower back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: aging-related enlargement of the prostate gland. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can make the prostate compress the urethra and slow or even stop the flow of urine, in much the same way that bending a garden hose chokes off the flow of water. BPH affects about three-quarters of men over age 60. Prostate cancer: the growth of cancerous cells inside the prostate, which may break out of the gland and affect other parts of the body. In the United States, about 1 man in 7 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. It occurs mainly in older men.
18 Apr 2017
5
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