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Todd/Browning Gallery in Los Angeles presents BENEATH THE VALLEY OF THE DOLLS: photographs by Wil Gordon, Jessica Robertson, Kelly Smith & Tiffany Trenda. August 13 - October 4. www.toddbrowning****
5 Nov 2009
619
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2:17
The first full-length feature by LA-based artist and filmmaker Anna Biller (The Hypnotist; A Visit From The Incubus), VIVA is "a spot-on spoof of low-grade late 60s/early 70s sexploitation flicks" (Variety) that joyously and faithfully pays homage to the classics of the genre. Written by, directed by and starring Biller, the film is a highly stylized, super-colour-saturated, satirical romp through the kind of camp sleaze and nudge-nudge wink-wink jocularity that will be all too familiar to fans of Herschell Gordon Lewis' "Suburban Roulette", Radley Metzger's "Camille 2000" and Russ Meyer's "Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls". Biller's remarkable attention to detail and painstakingly accurate recreation of the trash aesthetics that make the sexploitation genre so enjoyable have led to Fangoria magazine describing VIVA as "incredible, experimental, hilarious and hotter than hell in June� a film that needs to be seen by any self-respecting trash movie enthusiast." Biller stars as Barbi, a voluptuous, bored suburban housewife with a workaholic husband, Rick (Chad England), who, although perfect in most ways is indifferent to her physical and emotional needs. To get through the monotony of her days, Barbi turns to the companionship of her wealthy, swinging neighbours, Sheila (Bridget Brno) and Mark (Jared Sanford). It's not long before both couples decide to split up, prompting the newly liberated Sheila to drag Barbi headlong into the middle of the burgeoning sexual revolution. Changing her name to Viva, the once innocent housewife embarks on a wild ride in search of love and adventure. It's a journey that takes her into a world full of new experiences, from bisexual liaisons to psychedelic, drug-fuelled orgies and from bohemian nudist colonies to high-class brothels. Looking like a lost film from the late 1960s, VIVA is a fun and loving tribute to the pre-porn era of cinema, when copies of "Playboy" could be found alongside "Time" magazine on the coffee tables of gaudily decorated living rooms all across America. For fans of B-movie exploitation cinema, kinky softcore, high-camp comedy and all things retro, VIVA is a must.
5 Jun 2010
16654
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2:17
The first full-length feature by LA-based artist and filmmaker Anna Biller (The Hypnotist; A Visit From The Incubus), VIVA is "a spot-on spoof of low-grade late 60s/early 70s sexploitation flicks" (Variety) that joyously and faithfully pays homage to the classics of the genre.Written by, directed by and starring Biller, the film is a highly stylized, super-colour-saturated, satirical romp through the kind of camp sleaze and nudge-nudge wink-wink jocularity that will be all too familiar to fans of Herschell Gordon Lewis' "Suburban Roulette", Radley Metzger's "Camille 2000" and Russ Meyer's "Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls". Biller's remarkable attention to detail and painstakingly accurate recreation of the trash aesthetics that make the sexploitation genre so enjoyable have led to Fangoria magazine describing VIVA as "incredible, experimental, hilarious and hotter than hell in June� a film that needs to be seen by any self-respecting trash movie enthusiast."Biller stars as Barbi, a voluptuous, bored suburban housewife with a workaholic husband, Rick (Chad England), who, although perfect in most ways is indifferent to her physical and emotional needs. To get through the monotony of her days, Barbi turns to the companionship of her wealthy, swinging neighbours, Sheila (Bridget Brno) and Mark (Jared Sanford). It's not long before both couples decide to split up, prompting the newly liberated Sheila to drag Barbi headlong into the middle of the burgeoning sexual revolution. Changing her name to Viva, the once innocent housewife embarks on a wild ride in search of love and adventure. It's a journey that takes her into a world full of new experiences, from bisexual liaisons to psychedelic, drug-fuelled orgies and from bohemian nudist colonies to high-class brothels.Looking like a lost film from the late 1960s, VIVA is a fun and loving tribute to the pre-porn era of cinema, when copies of "Playboy" could be found alongside "Time" magazine on the coffee tables of gaudily decorated living rooms all across America. For fans of B-movie exploitation cinema, kinky softcore, high-camp comedy and all things retro, VIVA is a must.
11 Jul 2010
26111
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12:54
My video #186 explains divine signs in Cheer Up songs and it’s continued on 186a & b. On 9-4-10 I needed a cheer up so I synced a few songs, (the theme from The Valley of the Dolls by Dionne Warwick , Homeward Bound by Simon and Garfunkel and Whitney Houston's Step by Step), I synced those songs to scenes from a couple of movies. When I realized how much help I had from God to do this I added a talk at the start to explain that THESE ARE DIVINE SIGNS THAT SHOULD BE SHARED and not kept just for me. It's so blatantly obvious that I posted it at You Tube to challenge how picky they are about copyright, because Vimeo already provoked the wrath of God by deleting my videos due to copyright violations as I explained in classes 161, 167 and L116 at You Tube and Vimeo. I made classes 186a and 186b to explain this 186 better. This paragraph is a list of my best patriotic classes, (186a & b were my first two 15 minutes each). Class L109 is 1:37 hours and was made from L104 except I cut out the detour stories and added relevant stories to better show the magic of patriotism. I condensed L109 into the 15 minute patriot class L112 and then made the first 24 minutes of L113 to go with L112 because they both are my best and shortest explanations of Pearl Harbor, the start and end of WWII and how it so easily explains the main part of the book of Revelation in the Bible. Class 171 is a 13 minute lesson of how America needs to get the magic of patriotism back. With ALL of these lessons you can completely miss the point and a lot of divine and/ or patriotic magic if you are not tolerant of a teacher and prophet (and “the one”) who is a disabled mess on welfare that just recently learned to use a computer. 186, a & b are also at MikeOversonEndTimes.info.
5 Sep 2010
330
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2:17
The first full-length feature by LA-based artist and filmmaker Anna Biller (The Hypnotist; A Visit From The Incubus), VIVA is "a spot-on spoof of low-grade late 60s/early 70s sexploitation flicks" (Variety) that joyously and faithfully pays homage to the classics of the genre. Written by, directed by and starring Biller, the film is a highly stylized, super-colour-saturated, satirical romp through the kind of camp sleaze and nudge-nudge wink-wink jocularity that will be all too familiar to fans of Herschell Gordon Lewis' "Suburban Roulette", Radley Metzger's "Camille 2000" and Russ Meyer's "Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls". Biller's remarkable attention to detail and painstakingly accurate recreation of the trash aesthetics that make the sexploitation genre so enjoyable have led to Fangoria magazine describing VIVA as "incredible, experimental, hilarious and hotter than hell in June� a film that needs to be seen by any self-respecting trash movie enthusiast." Biller stars as Barbi, a voluptuous, bored suburban housewife with a workaholic husband, Rick (Chad England), who, although perfect in most ways is indifferent to her physical and emotional needs. To get through the monotony of her days, Barbi turns to the companionship of her wealthy, swinging neighbours, Sheila (Bridget Brno) and Mark (Jared Sanford). It's not long before both couples decide to split up, prompting the newly liberated Sheila to drag Barbi headlong into the middle of the burgeoning sexual revolution. Changing her name to Viva, the once innocent housewife embarks on a wild ride in search of love and adventure. It's a journey that takes her into a world full of new experiences, from bisexual liaisons to psychedelic, drug-fuelled orgies and from bohemian nudist colonies to high-class brothels. Looking like a lost film from the late 1960s, VIVA is a fun and loving tribute to the pre-porn era of cinema, when copies of "Playboy" could be found alongside "Time" magazine on the coffee tables of gaudily decorated living rooms all across America. For fans of B-movie exploitation cinema, kinky softcore, high-camp comedy and all things retro, VIVA is a must.
14 Apr 2013
2661
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