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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/imac/ iMac Review: Now all iMac models come standard with Intel Core processors built on a new architecture. Based on Intel's 32-nanometer process technology, these processors set new benchmarks for iMac performance.The available quad-core Intel Core i5 or Core i7 processor in the 27-inch iMac puts four processing cores on one die, so data doesn't have to travel far to get from core to core.Many iMac models now benefit from Turbo Boost technology built into the Intel Core series processors. If you're using a processor-intensive application such as Aperture 3 or Final Cut Pro that benefits from extra performance, Turbo Boost dynamically increases the speed of available cores.Every iMac includes powerful discrete graphics, meaning the graphics processor is separate from the CPU. So whether you're an amateur filmmaker or an avid gamer, iMac gives you faster, smoother, crisper graphics no matter which model you choose.The 21.5-inch iMac offers fast graphics performance with either the ATI Radeon HD 4670 with 256MB of dedicated memory or the ATI Radeon HD 5670 with 512MB of memory. Which one is right for you? The greater the memory, the faster the performance for graphics-intensive applications such as games and video editors.When you step up to the 27-inch iMac, you can choose the ATI Radeon HD 5670 with 512MB of memory. Or enjoy amazing performance with the ATI Radeon HD 5750 with 1GB of GDDR5 memory. You'll notice the speed boost every time you run your favorite 3D applications and games.Games scream on iMac, thanks to advanced ATI graphics. The discrete ATI Radeon HD 4670 processor delivers faster performance compared to the integrated NVIDIA GeForce 9400M processor in the previous-generation iMac. That'll keep you on your game, even inside the complex 3D environments of Call of Duty 4 or EVE. For faster graphics performance, choose an iMac with the ATI Radeon HD 5670 or ATI Radeon HD 5750.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/sony-xperia-play/ A Playstation phone has been the desire of many ever since Sony and Ericsson combined forces back in 2001. Soon after the merger, the Sony Cybershot brand was given to the Sony Ericsson range of camera phones, but despite the wishes of many, the Playstation phone never came. In recent times, the fortunes of Sony Ericsson within the industry haven’t always been positive, but the release of handsets running the Android OS has breathed a new lease of life into the brand, and now at long last we have the fabled Playstation phone, the Sony Ericsson Xperia Play. Weighing 175g, the Xperia Play measures in at 119 x 62 x 16mm, and boasts a large, 4.0 inch LED backlit capacitive touchscreen, supporting up to 16 million colours and with a pixel resolution of 480 x 854. The device has a slide out keypad, which houses the gaming control buttons, with a directional keypad for moving characters within games on the left, and the familiar Playstation Triangle, Square, Circle and Cross buttons on the right. There is a touch sensitive pad in between the two control pads, which works much the same way as the touchpad on a laptop. Soon after launch the Xperia Play will have close to 50 titles available, giving gamers a wide choice of games to choose from. In use the Xperia Play is surprisingly good, with capable graphic presentation and no noticeable lag in game play. The handset has auto rotate facility, which automatically rotates the display to landscape orientation when the control pad is slid out from the phone. There is a proximity sensor for auto turn off when in call, and the display supports multi touch input. Allowing game developers to incorporate an element of touchscreen input for titles released onto the Xperia Play. Aside from the main focus on the gaming capabilities of the handset, the Xperia Play in its own right is a more than capable all round smartphone. The handset is equipped with a decent quality 5.0 Megapixel camera, with autofocus and LED flash. Touch focus support is included, as is image stablisation, to eliminate those annoying blurred shots. Geotagging is also included, allowing you to capture the location details of pictures caught on the handsets camera, which can be shared with friends when the photos are uploaded online. Video recording is also enabled on the handset, and there is a second camera on the front of the device, for video calling purposes. Connectivity is a big part of the Xperia Play, and all the main technologies are included, with support for HSPA Mobile Broadband, along with GPRS, EDGE and WiFi 802.11 b/g/n with DLNA support, making it a breeze to integrate the device and share media with other compatible equipment across your home WLAN. Bluetooth 2.1 with A2DP is included for local connectivity, and there is a v2.0 Micro USB connector. The Sony Ericsson Xperia Play will ship with the latest version of Android OS, Android 2.3, and is powered by a 1 GHz processor along with an Adreno 205 GPU. There is plenty of memory available on board, with 400 MB on the device, which can be expanded up to 32 GB with Micro SD memory cards. An 8 GB card is supplied by Sony Ericsson in the box. The media player on the Play is well featured, with support for all the usual digital file formats, and the device also includes the excellent Track ID feature, one of our favourite options on Sony Ericsson handsets. Track ID allows you to scan elements of a song, which is then uploaded to the Sony Ericsson server, to determine the name of the tune, the artist and album. A 3.5mm audio jack is included, plus the device has built in stereo speakers, which give good sound play when listening to music and playing games.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/samsung-galaxy/ Samsung Galaxy Tab Review: The Galaxy S™ 4G has a brilliant screen to entertain you, and an HD camcorder to capture and share the best moments in life. Whether you’re watching live sports, streaming your favorite shows, or video chatting face-to-face with Qik™, your on-the-go time just got better. Stream your favorite shows and NBA games on T-Mobile TV with mobile HD. Plus, get 30 days free of T-Mobile TV Prime, which has additional channels of live and on-demand TV, and full episodes of top shows. Video chat powered by Qik™ makes it easy to share any moment with friends and family. Start a live two-way video chat to share what’s happening, or capture all the amazing details of the moment in a Video Mail if you can’t connect live. Be a part of the action when you take video in HD, wherever you are. Capture every detail in 720-pixel resolution; then share your videos right from your phone via e-mail, social networks, or video-sharing sites. INCEPTION is just the beginning. You can rent or buy thousands of movies on Samsung® Media Hub. Listen to your favorite music with Slacker® Radio, or synch to iTunes® with doubleTwist®. And catch up on your favorite reading with Kindle for Android™. The Galaxy S™ 4G has hardware that puts it in a class of its own, like a stunning, Super AMOLED screen and 16GB of storage. Wi-Fi, Android™ 2.2, and Google Maps™ complete the package for a seamless experience, everywhere you go.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/motorola-atrix/ Motorola Atrix Review: The hardware on the Atrix is the real star of the show.  It’s packing a dual-core Tegra 2 processor, a full gigabyte of RAM, front facing camera, and everything else people on AT&T have been waiting for.  The full specifications are: NVIDIA’s dual-core Tegra 2 processor, clocked in at 1 GHz 1024 MB of system RAM 16382 MB (16GB) internal storage microSD card slot (up to 32 GB size card) 4-inch capacitive touchscreen at 540×960 (qHD) resolution 5 MP rear camera with 720p video capture and dual LED flash, VGA (0.3 MP) front-facing camera Android 2.2.1 Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR, AGPS, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi 1930 mAh battery GSM 850, 900, 1800, 1900, UMTS 850, 1900, 2100 and 14.4 Mbit/s HSDPA / 2.0 Mbit/s HSUPA * radio So the hardware is nothing to sneeze at.  It’s by far the most powerful smartphone hardware we’ve ever seen.  But exactly how is it packaged up?  The phone is a mixture of plastic with a Gorilla Glass screen.  The screen is glossy plastic with no coating, but the way the battery door wraps around it feels very solid.  You’ll see what I mean in the pictures that follow.  It is a total fingerprint magnet though — front and back. The front of the phone is your standard black slab, with capacitive buttons and a cutout for the earpiece.  The buttons are silkscreened and have the same order as the Droid X and Droid 2 models — menu-home-back-search.  It looks like Motorola has decided on a button order, let’s hope they stick to it.  At the very bottom edge is a microphone, and beside the earpiece is the VGA front-facing camera, tucked safely away under the same sheet of Gorilla glass that covers the entire face of the phone. On the rear of the phone is the 5 MP camera with its dual flash setup, a small (but surprisingly loud and clear) external speaker grill, a second noise-canceling microphone, and the power button/fingerprint scanner combo.  The power button placement and arrangement takes some getting used to, but in the end it works great.  Now that I’m back to my personal phone, I find myself missing it.  On top next to the power switch is a 3.5 mm headphone jack, which is good and solid without being too deep.  You’ll appreciate that if you use wired headphones, either by choice or because you broke your Bluetooth MotoRokr set.  I fall into the later category. On the phone’s left edge are the USB and HDMI port.  Shout out to Motorola here — the connectors are rock solid, with little to no wiggle on either.  I wouldn’t be afraid that things are going to break, as both the included cables (yes, Moto gives you a HDMI cable to call your own) and the dock connectors fit snugly and just right.  On the right side the volume rocker switch sits alone, being in a good position for easy use, but entirely too small and aggravating as all get out.  If you frequently use the volume switch, you’ll probably get used to it, but I sure didn’t.  Yes, nit-picky, but important to many — including myself. Under the battery door everything fits nicely, is easy to get to, and feels very well made.  We shouldn’t be surprised here — Motorola makes quality phones, and the Atrix is no exception.  The only gripe I can find is the battery door itself.  The material is thin, flexible plastic.  The way the battery door wraps around the corners of the phone you don’t notice this while it’s on, but I was a little worried the first time I removed it that I would break it.  I didn’t, and maybe I am worried over nothing, but it seems out of place on an otherwise rugged feeling piece of hardware.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/macbook-air/ MacBook Air Review: A truly mobile device needs to be light, thin, and strong enough to take with you wherever you go. It also needs to perform quickly, spring to life instantly, and have enough battery power to keep up with you. It should have no spinning hard drive, no optical drive, and no unnecessary parts. All of that is true of iPad. And now, it's true of Apple's most mobile notebook ever: MacBook Air.MacBook Air continues its legacy of firsts with something entirely new for any Mac: flash storage. Standard. In fact, the new MacBook Air is designed completely around flash storage. But in a totally different way. Typically, flash storage is housed in a package that's the same size as a conventional hard drive. Yet the flash chips themselves occupy a very small portion of that housing. Getting rid of the hard drive enclosure and using only the parts that matter — the actual flash chips — frees up about 90 percent more space. And just like that, there's room for other important things, like a bigger battery. Now you have a notebook that weighs practically nothing and runs for hours on a single charge. That's mobility mastered.No one knows Multi-Touch technology better than Apple. Introduced with the very first iPhone and taken even further with iPad, Multi-Touch is now part of practically every Apple device. It's simply the best and most personal way to interact with your software. And the optimal way to experience Multi-Touch on a notebook is through a trackpad. That's precisely the case with MacBook Air. Now you can perform more gestures than you have fingers on a spacious, all-glass surface that's smooth to the touch.If you looked inside MacBook Air, you'd see something remarkable: how much space we devoted to the battery. Apple engineers were able to fit all the computer components on one of our smallest logic boards ever. Removing the flash storage enclosure and placing the flash chips on the logic board freed up even more room. And voila: space for a bigger battery. So you can get up to 5 hours of battery life on the 11-inch MacBook Air and up to 7 hours on the 13-inch model. And when you put MacBook Air to sleep for more than an hour, it enters what's called standby mode. So you can come back to MacBook Air a day, a week — even up to an entire month later — and it wakes in an instant.1 Time is on your side, courtesy of MacBook Air.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/ipod-touch/ iPod Touch Review: Video calling is in full effect on iPod touch. Now your friends can see what you're up to, when you're up to it. With the tap of a button, you can wave "hi" while standing in a foreign country, get a second opinion on a pair of boots, or have your friends bear witness to the everyday pranks, bets, and dares they otherwise might have missed — new iPod touch to new iPod touch or iPhone 4 over Wi-Fi. And come face to face with even more fun.iPod touch has two built-in cameras, one on the front above the display and one on the back. The front camera has been tuned for FaceTime. It has just the right field of view and focal length to focus on your face at arm's length. So it always presents you in the best possible light. Which is particularly handy when you're talking to someone who's more than just a friend.Thanks to the Retina display, everything you see and do on iPod touch looks amazing. That's because the Retina display's pixel density is so high your eye is unable to distinguish individual pixels. Which means images in games, movies, and photos pop off the screen. Text in books, web pages, and email is crisp at any size. And everything is sharper. No wonder it's called "cutting edge."Behind the screen of iPod touch, there's some serious technology going on. By developing pixels a mere 78 micrometers wide, Apple engineers were able to pack four times the number of pixels into the same size screen found on earlier iPod touch models. This many pixels packed this close together — 326 per inch — make graphics and text look smooth and continuous at any size. Prepare to be glued to the screen.Because your iPod touch — and its built-in HD video camera — go with you everywhere, you're always ready to record when the moment strikes. And now you can do it in stunning high definition. An advanced backside illumination sensor delivers brilliant video in both bright and low-light settings. And when you're done shooting, you can edit and share your movie in just a few taps. With iPod touch, you're the only film crew you need.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/ipad-2/ iPad 2 Review: Once you pick up iPad 2, it’ll be hard to put down. That’s the idea behind the all-new design. It’s 33 percent thinner and up to 15 percent lighter, so it feels even more comfortable in your hands.2 And it makes surfing the web, checking email, watching movies, and reading books so natural, you might forget there’s incredible technology under your fingers. Two powerful cores in one A5 chip mean iPad can do twice the work at once. You’ll notice the difference when you’re surfing the web, watching movies, making FaceTime video calls, gaming, and going from app to app to app. Multitasking is smoother, apps load faster, and everything just works better. With up to nine times the graphics performance, gameplay on iPad is even smoother and more realistic. And faster graphics help apps perform better — especially those with video. You’ll see it when you’re scrolling through your photo library, editing video with iMovie, and viewing animations in Keynote. Even with the new thinner and lighter design, iPad has the same amazing 10-hour battery life.1 That’s enough juice for one flight across the ocean, or one movie-watching all-nighter, or a week’s commute across town. The power-efficient A5 chip and iOS keep battery life from fading away, so you can get carried away. You’ll see two cameras on iPad — one on the front and one on the back. They may be tiny, but they’re a big deal. They’re designed for FaceTime video calling, and they work together so you can talk to your favorite people and see them smile and laugh back at you.3 The front camera puts you and your friend face-to-face. Switch to the back camera during your video call to share where you are, who you’re with, or what’s going on around you. When you’re not using FaceTime, let the back camera roll if you see something movie-worthy. It’s HD, so whatever you shoot is a mini-masterpiece. And you can take wacky snapshots in Photo Booth. It’s the most fun a face can have. iPad 2 and the iPad Smart Cover are made for each other. Literally.4 We designed the iPad Smart Cover to work side-by-side with iPad — and on top and underneath it, too. Smart magnetic technology built into each really pulls them together. The iPad Smart Cover falls perfectly into place and stays put to protect your iPad screen, yet doesn’t add bulk to its thin, light design. Open the Smart Cover and your iPad wakes up instantly. Close it and your iPad goes to sleep automatically. And here’s another smart part: It transforms into the perfect movie-watching, game-playing, web-surfing stand. It comes in 10 bright colors — including five in rich, aniline-dyed Italian leather. Choose your favorite, and your iPad will be smart all around. iPad is one big, beautiful display — 9.7 inches of high-resolution photos, movies, web pages, books, and more. LED backlighting makes everything you see remarkably crisp, vivid, and bright. Even in places with low light, like an airplane. And there’s no wrong way to hold iPad. It’s designed to show off everything in portrait and landscape, so with every turn (even upside down), the display adjusts to fit. Because it uses a display technology called IPS (in-plane switching), it has a wide, 178° viewing angle. Hold it up to someone across the room, or share it with someone sitting next to you, and everyone gets a brilliant view. Technology is at its best when it feels completely natural, almost like there’s no technology at all. That’s Multi-Touch on iPad. You use your fingers to do everything, so everything you do — surfing the web, typing email, reading books, and swiping through photos — is easier and a lot more fun. How does it work? When your fingers touch the display, it senses them using electrical fields. Then it instantly transforms your taps, swipes, pinches, and flicks into lifelike actions. Just like that. With the built-in accelerometer, you can rotate iPad to portrait or landscape, or even upside down, and whatever you’re watching, reading, or seeing adjusts to fit the display. And now the accelerometer, three-axis gyroscope, and compass all work together. They sense which direction iPad is heading and how it’s moving. So games, maps, and other apps know your every twist, turn, tilt, and 360. It’s an epic win for gaming. And it’s just the beginning of better-than-ever iPad apps.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/ipad/ iPad Review: The iPad is a tablet computer designed, developed and marketed by Apple primarily as a platform for audio-visual media including books, periodicals, movies, music, games, and web content. At about 1.5 pounds (680 grams), its size and weight fall between those of contemporary smartphones and laptop computers. Apple released the iPad in April 2010, and sold 3 million of the devices in 80 days. According to a report released by Strategy Analytics, the Apple iPad had gained a 95 percent share of Tablet PC sales at the end of the second quarter of 2010. During the second quarter of 2010, Apple sold 4.19 million iPads around the world. The iPad runs the same operating system as the iPod Touch and iPhone—and can run its own applications as well as iPhone applications. Without modification, and with the exception of web applications, it will only run programs approved by Apple and distributed via its online store. Like iPhone and iPod Touch, the iPad is controlled by a multitouch display—a departure from most previous tablet computers, which used a pressure-triggered stylus—as well as a virtual onscreen keyboard in lieu of a physical keyboard. The iPad uses a Wi-Fi data connection to browse the Internet, load and stream media, and install software. Some models also have a 3G wireless data connection which can connect to HSPA data networks. The device is managed and synced by iTunes on a personal computer viaUSB cable. The iPad’s touchscreen display is a 9.7 in (25 cm) liquid crystal display (1024 × 768 pixels) with fingerprint-resistant and scratch-resistant glass. Steve Jobs backed the choice of screen size, saying a 7-inch screen would be “too small to express the software.” He said 10 inches was the minimum for a tablet screen. Like the iPhone, the iPad is designed to be controlled by bare fingers; normal gloves and styli that prevent electrical conductivity may not be used, although there are special gloves andcapacitive styli designed for this use.
  • 4 May 2011
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*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/htc-flyer/ The Flyer isn’t part of the pack of tablets running the latest version of Google’s Android software, 3.0 Honeycomb. Instead, HTC has slapped its Sense custom user interface, seen on the company’s smart phones, over the top of Android 2.4 Gingerbread. For those keeping track of version numbers, Android 2.4 and Android 2.3 are both known as ‘Gingerbread’, since these two versions of the operating system are almost identical. Android 3.0 Honeycomb is a version specifically designed for tablets, rather than for smart phones. Sticking to the older version of Android has given HTC the time to customise the interface significantly. We haven’t seen the Flyer’s user interface in action yet, but HTC told us that it’s tweaked all of its apps to take advantage of the tablet’s extra screen space. For example, the email app will have two panels, showing your inbox and an email at the same time. HTC is one of the only companies that’s done a great job of skinning Android. Its Sense user interface has been making geeky phone software better-looking and easier to use ever since it first appeared on the Hero. Consequently, we’re cautiously optimistic about HTC’s software efforts on the Flyer. We also loved the Samsung Galaxy Tab, even though it only ran Android 2.2, so there’s hope for the Flyer too. But — and this is a big but — the Galaxy Tab came out about five months ago, before Honeycomb was even out. At the time, we were thrilled to embrace a more pocket-friendly, Android alternative to the iPad. But even Google has said that Android wasn’t well suited to tablets before Honeycomb emerged. Even if HTC’s Sense skin overcomes the fact that Android 2.4 isn’t optimised for tablets, we think it’ll be hard for any self-respecting geek to break the piggy bank open for a gadget that’s not cutting-edge. You may disagree, though. After all, HTC has proven with its phones that it can do a great job of designing a user interface. You may not particularly care which version of Android your tablet runs either. Also, HTC has promised that the Flyer will get an update to Honeycomb eventually. Being stuck on Gingerbread doesn’t mean the Flyer is likely to miss out on many features. You’ll still have access to the Android Market, which is full of apps and games to install on your robot friend. Android apps tend to be less elegant than the apps available for the iPad, and there are fewer of them. But, on the plus side, some of them offer wilder features — like augmented reality — and they tend to be very cheap or even free. The Android browser is also a treat, because it renders Web pages quickly and accurately. It supports Flash Player too, which means you won’t miss out on online videos, and you won’t have to rely on the separate YouTube app. Even if you have no interest in the latest cute cat videos from Japan, having Flash support in the browser is fantastic just for moving around the many sites that use it for menus and navigation. One thing we don’t know is how the Flyer’s 1.4GHz, single-core processor will stack up against the 1GHz, dual-core chip of the Motorola Xoom and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. Stay tuned for some benchmark results as soon as we get these beauties into the lab.
  • 4 May 2011
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