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My second full day in London (May 11, 2008) started off with gorgeous sunshine. Andrea and I enjoyed a fabulous breakfast at the Zetter Hotel, a cool boutique type hotel in London’s Clerkenwell area. Then we decided to make our way to the Liverpool Street Station to hop onto the No. 11 bus that would take us past all sorts of important sights to the historic Victoria Railway Station – a great, inexpensive way to view some of London’s main attractions. We then walked toward Buckingham Palace and got caught in the crowds awaiting the famous Changing of the Guards Ritual. After the ceremonial parade had passed by, we strolled beside beautiful St. James’s Park to Trafalgar Square. From here we made our way past the Horse Guards and Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s residence) to the Houses of Parliament where we arrived just minutes before Big Ben proudly rang out noon. From the bridge we had a perfect view of the the Parliament Buildings and the London Eye, London’s famous giant ferris wheel. Shortly after 1 pm we took a sightseeing boat from Westminster Pier to Greenwich, and enjoyed the guide’s humorous narration as he explained various sights along the riverbanks of the Thames, including Tower Bridge, one of London’s most recognized landmarks. Upon our arrival in Greenwich we had to race to the Docklands Railway to make our way to Whitechapel where we were going to link up with a tour called “The Unknown East End of London”. Harry Jackson, our certified Blue Badge tour guide filled us in about the colourful history of this area, traditionally home to successive waves of immigrant labourers who, among others, included French Huguenots, Ashkenazi Jews and more recently, Bengali immigrants. Jack the Ripper of course terrorized this area in the late 1800s and was included in the stories. On Brick Lane we happened across a street festival and ended our tour at Christ Church, Spitalfields. After a short walk we arrived at Liverpool Street Station and took the tube back to our hotel (the Zetter) where we got a brief private tour of some of the unique suites of this boutique hotel. In the late afternoon we relocated to a bed and breakfast in the Holland Park area and after settling in, we headed out to Snaresbrook to join Andrea’s friends for a tasty Indian takeout dinner. Another packed day in London!
  • 11 Aug 2011
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One item that cannot miss from any travel itinerary in Toronto is a visit to Chinatown and Kensington. After a long day of work on August 7, 2008 I met my European visitors downtown in front of the CHUM City Building (home of City TV). We walked westwards along the funky stores of Queen Street West and headed north on Spadina where we took in the sights of Toronto’s Fashion District. North of Dundas the flavour turned decidedly Oriental as we entered Chinatown. Colourful merchandise, fragrant fruits, the smells of seafood and the hustle and bustle of people shopping and strolling assaulted our senses. As always, we were fascinated by the various forms of fried fowl that were hanging in the store windows, naturally with heads and feet still attached. A few streets north of Spadina we headed west to check out the eclectic collection of restaurants, funky stores and multicultural food emporiums that makes up Kensington Market. One of Toronto’s oldest and most colourful neighbourhoods, the former “Jewish Market” is a National Historic Site today. Almost 60,000 Jewish residents lived here in the 1920s and 1930s and worshipped at more than 30 synagogues. After World War II most of the Jewish population relocated further north, and additional waves of diverse immigrant groups moved in. Today, people from the Caribbean, East Asia, the Azores and Latin America are well represented here and the colourful mix of restaurants and stores reflects these diverse origins. We strolled back on Dundas Street, past the newly expanding Art Gallery of Ontario, a $250+ million redevelopment designed by award-winning star architect Frank Gehry whose famous creations include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (Spain), the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago’s Millenium Park. For dinner we headed over to Baldwin Street, a small side street south of the University of Toronto that features a diverse mix of restaurants, including Italian, French, Indian, Thai and Japanese cuisine. We capped the evening off with a tasty dinner at the Gateway to India restaurant. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 25 Feb 2010
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Day two of our Eastern Canada bus tour started with an early morning wake-up call on August 9, 2008. For our 8 pm bus departure we did have enough time to go for a quick breakfast just steps from the Hotel Le Concorde in Quebec City where we had been staying. A quick stroll south on Rue Grande Allee Ouest, location of many restaurants and nightclubs, took us to a restaurant by the name of St. Hubert which featured an extensive breakfast buffet. Punctually at 8 am our bus drove us five minutes into the centre of Vieux Québec where we had about an hour and half to explore the old part of the city. I walked down into the old port area where historic limestone buildings house dozens of restaurants, boutiques and specialty shops. On Place de Paris I came across a TV shoot for the local weather station that featured the host of the show all dressed up in historic French attire, surrounded by a quartet of singers and several other extras, also sporting 17th century dresses. A walk on the waterfront allowed me to take in views across the St. Lawrence River as well as a glimpse back up to the majestic Chateau Frontenac. For $1.75 I took a ride in the funicular, which whisked me back up the hill to the Place d’Armes within mere seconds. Shortly before 10 am it was time to leave for our next destination: Montreal. After a quick lunch in St. Hyacinthe, we reached our first destination, the Olympic Stadium, at around 2 pm. We took the cable car up the tallest inclined tower in the world from where we enjoyed a perfect 360 degree view of the City. Right next to the Olympic Stadium we had a chance to visit the former Olympic velodrome which was converted into the Montreal Biodome in 1992, a nature museum that features replicas of four eco-systems: a tropical South American rain forest, the Laurentian Forest, the Saint Lawrence Marine Eco-system and a polar area featuring animals from the Arctic and Antarctic. The penguin feeding was particularly popular among the audience. At our next stop we were able to admire the magnificent Notre-Dame Basilica and Place d’Armes in Old Montreal. The basilica was completed in the first half of the 19th century and upon its completion in 1843 it was the largest church in all of North America. Many famous people have visited this church: John Paul II visited the basilica in 1982 and raised its status to that of basilica, Celine Dion’s wedding took place here in 1994, and Pierre Trudeau’s funeral was held at Notre-Dame Basilica in 2000. Our next destination was St. Joseph’s Oratory, a Roman Catholic Basilica on the northern slopes of Mont Royal which features the third largest dome in the world. St. Joseph’s Oratory is one of Montreal’s most recognizable landmarks and the largest church in Canada. Brother André, a pious man from a poor family, whose prayers cured many, began building a small chapel on the slopes of Mount Royal in 1904. As word of his miraculous healing powers spread, he attracted funding from supporters from around the world which led to the construction of the imposing St. Joseph’s Oratory. Construction started in 1924 and was finally completed in 1967. The basilica holds Brother André’s tomb as well as his heart which is preserved in a reliquary. The church is dedicated to St. Joseph, to whom Brother André attributed all the miracles. A chapel houses thousands of votive candles and hundreds of walking sticks and canes that attest to the many miraculous healings that took place as a result of Brother André’s prayers. Pope John Paul II finally beatified Brother André in 1982. In the evening we checked into our central hotel, the Holiday Inn on Sherbrooke Street in downtown Montreal. For dinner we took a stroll over to Prince-Arthur Street, a popular pedestrian street that features a variety of restaurants. We enjoyed a sampling of Polish cuisine at Mazurka restaurant and headed back on Boulevard St-Laurent where dozens of dance clubs were attracting a crowd of stylish young people, ready to party the night away. We of course had to get to sleep for our 6:45 am departure the next day. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 16 Jan 2010
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One item that cannot miss from any travel itinerary in Toronto is a visit to Chinatown and Kensington. After a long day of work on August 7, 2008 I met my European visitors downtown in front of the CHUM City Building (home of City TV). We walked westwards along the funky stores of Queen Street West and headed north on Spadina where we took in the sights of Toronto’s Fashion District. North of Dundas the flavour turned decidedly Oriental as we entered Chinatown. Colourful merchandise, fragrant fruits, the smells of seafood and the hustle and bustle of people shopping and strolling assaulted our senses. As always, we were fascinated by the various forms of fried fowl that were hanging in the store windows, naturally with heads and feet still attached. A few streets north of Spadina we headed west to check out the eclectic collection of restaurants, funky stores and multicultural food emporiums that makes up Kensington Market. One of Toronto’s oldest and most colourful neighbourhoods, the former “Jewish Market” is a National Historic Site today. Almost 60,000 Jewish residents lived here in the 1920s and 1930s and worshipped at more than 30 synagogues. After World War II most of the Jewish population relocated further north, and additional waves of diverse immigrant groups moved in. Today, people from the Caribbean, East Asia, the Azores and Latin America are well represented here and the colourful mix of restaurants and stores reflects these diverse origins. We strolled back on Dundas Street, past the newly expanding Art Gallery of Ontario, a $250+ million redevelopment designed by award-winning star architect Frank Gehry whose famous creations include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (Spain), the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago’s Millenium Park. For dinner we headed over to Baldwin Street, a small side street south of the University of Toronto that features a diverse mix of restaurants, including Italian, French, Indian, Thai and Japanese cuisine. We capped the evening off with a tasty dinner at the Gateway to India restaurant. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 13 Feb 2009
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Day two of our Eastern Canada bus tour started with an early morning wake-up call on August 9, 2008. For our 8 pm bus departure we did have enough time to go for a quick breakfast just steps from the Hotel Le Concorde in Quebec City where we had been staying. A quick stroll south on Rue Grande Allee Ouest, location of many restaurants and nightclubs, took us to a restaurant by the name of St. Hubert which featured an extensive breakfast buffet. Punctually at 8 am our bus drove us five minutes into the centre of Vieux Québec where we had about an hour and half to explore the old part of the city. I walked down into the old port area where historic limestone buildings house dozens of restaurants, boutiques and specialty shops. On Place de Paris I came across a TV shoot for the local weather station that featured the host of the show all dressed up in historic French attire, surrounded by a quartet of singers and several other extras, also sporting 17th century dresses. A walk on the waterfront allowed me to take in views across the St. Lawrence River as well as a glimpse back up to the majestic Chateau Frontenac. For $1.75 I took a ride in the funicular, which whisked me back up the hill to the Place d’Armes within mere seconds. Shortly before 10 am it was time to leave for our next destination: Montreal. After a quick lunch in St. Hyacinthe, we reached our first destination, the Olympic Stadium, at around 2 pm. We took the cable car up the tallest inclined tower in the world from where we enjoyed a perfect 360 degree view of the City. Right next to the Olympic Stadium we had a chance to visit the former Olympic vecodrome which was converted into the Montreal Biodome in 1992, a nature museum that features replicas of four eco-systems: a tropical South American rain forest, the Laurentian Forest, the Saint Lawrence Marine Eco-system and a polar area featuring animals from the Arctic and Antarctic. The penguin feeding was particularly popular among the audience. At our next stop we were able to admire the magnificent Notre-Dame Basilica and Place d’Armes in Old Montreal. The basilica was completed in the first half of the 19th century and upon its completion in 1843 it was the largest church in all of North America. Many famous people have visited this church: John Paul II visited the basilica in 1982 and raised its status to that of basilica, Celine Dion’s wedding took place here in 1994, and Pierre Trudeau’s funeral was held at Notre-Dame Basilica in 2000. Our next destination was St. Joseph’s Oratory, a Roman Catholic Basilica on the northern slopes of Mont Royal which features the third largest dome in the world. St. Joseph’s Oratory is one of Montreal’s most recognizable landmarks and the largest church in Canada. Brother André, a pious man from a poor family, whose prayers cured many, began building a small chapel on the slopes of Mount Royal in 1904. As word of his miraculous healing powers spread, he attracted funding from supporters from around the world which led to the construction of the imposing St. Joseph’s Oratory. Construction started in 1924 and was finally completed in 1967. The basilica holds Brother André’s tomb as well as his heart which is preserved in a reliquary. The church is dedicated to St. Joseph, to whom Brother André attributed all the miracles. A chapel houses thousands of votive candles and hundreds of walking sticks and canes that attest to the many miraculous healings that took place as a result of Brother André’s prayers. Pope John Paul II finally beatified Brother André in 1982. In the evening we checked into our central hotel, the Holiday Inn on Sherbrooke Street in downtown Montreal. For dinner we took a stroll over to Prince-Arthur Street, a popular pedestrian street that features a variety of restaurants. We enjoyed a sampling of Polish cuisine at Mazurka restaurant and headed back on Boulevard St-Laurent where dozens of dance clubs were attracting a crowd of stylish young people, ready to party the night away. We of course had to get to sleep for our 6:45 am departure the next day. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 9 Feb 2009
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
  • 611
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
  • 540
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
  • 339
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
  • 983
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Summer is a really beautiful time in Ontario. I decided to show my European guests a little bit of Ontario’s country charm, so we planned an overnight getaway for July 30 and 31, 2008. Just after lunch on July 30, 2008 we started driving east of the city to the charming country town of Port Hope, just about 100 km east of Toronto. Port Hope is a pretty little town of about 16,000, located at the mouth of the Ganaraska River that is a favourite destination of salmon fishermen in the fall. I was there probably 7 or 8 years ago and since then Port Hope has been spruced up considerably. Many new restaurants and boutiques have been opened, and Port Hope has become a favourite getaway destination for city-weary Torontonians. From here we continued on to Cobourg, another attractive country town just about 10 minutes east of Port Hope. With about 18,000 residents, Cobourg, Ontario’s Feel Good Town, is slightly larger which makes it the largest town in Northumberland County. It features stunning Victoria Hall, a classical building dating back to the 1850s that now houses the municipal offices as well as a concert hall and art gallery. The main street features many cute shops and boutiques. From here we walked towards the waterfront and stopped at the King George Inn, a historic hotel that actually used to be the Cobourg Jail until about 10 years ago. In the basement you can still see various jail cells in their original state. Last but not least we strolled to the waterfront where we enjoyed the beautiful marina and had a look at the wide sandy beach of Victoria Park. Through the rolling hills of Eastern Ontario we made our way to Peterborough where we stopped briefly at the waterfront to admire the preparations for a free concert that was to be held in the evening in the waterfront park. As it was getting late we decided to locate our bed and breakfast, the Shining Waters B&B, just outside Lakefield. Hostess Susan Castle showed us around her 1860s fieldstone farm house that features four beautifully decorated bedrooms. In the evening we had a delicious dinner at Cassis Restaurant in downtown Lakefield where we enjoyed a variety of French delicacies. After a filling breakfast on a gorgeous morning the next day we explored the expansive grounds surrounding the Shining Waters B&B. These include several kilometers of walking trails as well as a recently renovated barn that has become a popular wedding venue. In the late morning we set off to explore the Kawartha Lakes region. Our first stop was in Buckhorn where a Parks Canada employee explained to us the system of 44 locks that are part of the 386 km Trent-Severn Waterway. At mid-day we reached Bobcaygeon, a beautiful waterfront town where we had a late lunch on the patio of the Waterfront Restaurant, overlooking the serenity of the canal. Next came Fenelon Falls where we connected with two extremely friendly OPP officers that did not mind having their pictures taken with us. Our final stop was in the charming town of Port Perry which beckoned with its quaint shops and restaurants on Queen Street. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 19 Sep 2008
  • 400
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The last day of our Eastern Canada bus tour (August 10, 2008) started very early. After our early morning wakeup call we were scheduled for a 6:45 am departure. By mid-morning we had arrived in Ottawa where our first stop was at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. We had about an hour to explore the most visited museum in Canada which was nowhere near enough to really take in the various exhibits and interactive displays that showcase 20,000 years of human history. The Grand Hall welcomed us with its architectural grandeur and a dozen totem poles. In the First Peoples Hall we explored the history of Canada’s aboriginal peoples, and the Canada Hall illustrates Canadian history through a variety of recreated streetscapes that authentically reproduce different eras in Canada’s history. We did not have enough time to explore the fourth level where “Face to Face”, The Canadian Personalities Hall, introduces dozens of significant individuals that have shaped Canada’s history. Just before boarding our bus again I literally run outside the museum to quickly capture a picture of the stunning view of Ottawa’s Parliament Buildings across the river. Parliament Hill was indeed our next destination where we stopped right in front of the main entrance, the Queen’s Gates. During our 20 minute stop we had a chance to walk up to the Centre Block, constructed between 1865 and 1927, which contains the House of Commons and Senate Chambers as well as the Peace Tower and Library of Parliament. Flanking the wide quadrangle on the right is the East Block, housing the senator’s offices, and on the right side is the West Block, which contains ministers and MP’s offices and meeting rooms. Behind the Centre Block are a number of statues of important Canadian statesmen, and a walkway on top of the cliffs that features a gorgeous view of the Ottawa River and the City of Hull on the other side. Time was short, so we had to get back on the bus to make it to our next stop: a sightseeing cruise through the Thousand Islands, an archipelago about 80 km downstream from Kingston. Around 1800 islands dot the St. Lawrence River here, and in 2002 the Thousand Islands-Frontenac Arch region was designated a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. The most popular attraction on this cruise is Boldt Castle on Heart Island that was initiated by George Boldt, the wealthy Prussian-born owner of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in New York City. In 1900 Boldt started construction on one of the largest private residences in America as a gift to his wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt. However, construction was stopped in 1904 when she suddenly died. For the following 73 years the estate was abandoned and exposed to harsh weather and vandalism. In 1977 finally, the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority finally purchased Heart Island and has been restoring it ever since. Today the castle is a prime tourist attraction and has been furnished again since 2006, however, mostly with modern pieces. After our boat tour we got back on the bus and arrived back in Toronto in the early evening. Despite the very compressed schedule, our Eastern Canada tour had given us a great bird’s eye overview of some of the beautiful places that Eastern Canada has to offer. It gave us a few ideas of places to explore next time, when there is more time The last day of our Eastern Canada bus tour (August 10, 2008) started very early. After our early morning wakeup call we were scheduled for a 6:45 am departure. By mid-morning we had arrived in Ottawa where our first stop was at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. We had about an hour to explore the most visited museum in Canada which was nowhere near enough to really take in the various exhibits and interactive displays that showcase 20,000 years of human history. The Grand Hall welcomed us with its architectural grandeur and a dozen totem poles. In the First Peoples Hall we explored the history of Canada’s aboriginal peoples, and the Canada Hall illustrates Canadian history through a variety of recreated streetscapes that authentically reproduce different eras in Canada’s history. We did not have enough time to explore the fourth level where “Face to Face”, The Canadian Personalities Hall, introduces dozens of significant individuals that have shaped Canada’s history. Just before boarding our bus again I literally run outside the museum to quickly capture a picture of the stunning view of Ottawa’s Parliament Buildings across the river. Parliament Hill was indeed our next destination where we stopped right in front of the main entrance, the Queen’s Gates. During our 20 minute stop we had a chance to walk up to the Centre Block, constructed between 1865 and 1927, which contains the House of Commons and Senate Chambers as well as the Peace Tower and Library of Parliament. Flanking the wide quadrangle on the right is the East Block, housing the senator’s offices, and on the right side is the West Block, which contains ministers and MP’s offices and meeting rooms. Behind the Centre Block are a number of statues of important Canadian statesmen, and a walkway on top of the cliffs that features a gorgeous view of the Ottawa River and the City of Hull on the other side. Time was short, so we had to get back on the bus to make it to our next stop: a sightseeing cruise through the Thousand Islands, an archipelago about 80 km downstream from Kingston. Around 1800 islands dot the St. Lawrence River here, and in 2002 the Thousand Islands-Frontenac Arch region was designated a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. The most popular attraction on this cruise is Boldt Castle on Heart Island that was initiated by George Boldt, the wealthy Prussian-born owner of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in New York City. In 1900 Boldt started construction on one of the largest private residences in America as a gift to his wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt. However, construction was stopped in 1904 when she suddenly died. For the following 73 years the estate was abandoned and exposed to harsh weather and vandalism. In 1977 finally, the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority finally purchased Heart Island and has been restoring it ever since. Today the castle is a prime tourist attraction and has been furnished again since 2006, however, mostly with modern pieces. After our boat tour we got back on the bus and arrived back in Toronto in the early evening. Despite the very compressed schedule, our Eastern Canada tour had given us a great bird’s eye overview of some of the beautiful places that Eastern Canada has to offer. It gave us a few ideas of places to explore next time, when there is more time Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 15 Sep 2008
  • 782
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The last day of our Eastern Canada bus tour (August 10, 2008) started very early. After our early morning wakeup call we were scheduled for a 6:45 am departure. By mid-morning we had arrived in Ottawa where our first stop was at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. We had about an hour to explore the most visited museum in Canada which was nowhere near enough to really take in the various exhibits and interactive displays that showcase 20,000 years of human history. The Grand Hall welcomed us with its architectural grandeur and a dozen totem poles. In the First Peoples Hall we explored the history of Canada’s aboriginal peoples, and the Canada Hall illustrates Canadian history through a variety of recreated streetscapes that authentically reproduce different eras in Canada’s history. We did not have enough time to explore the fourth level where “Face to Face”, The Canadian Personalities Hall, introduces dozens of significant individuals that have shaped Canada’s history. Just before boarding our bus again I literally run outside the museum to quickly capture a picture of the stunning view of Ottawa’s Parliament Buildings across the river. Parliament Hill was indeed our next destination where we stopped right in front of the main entrance, the Queen’s Gates. During our 20 minute stop we had a chance to walk up to the Centre Block, constructed between 1865 and 1927, which contains the House of Commons and Senate Chambers as well as the Peace Tower and Library of Parliament. Flanking the wide quadrangle on the right is the East Block, housing the senator’s offices, and on the right side is the West Block, which contains ministers and MP’s offices and meeting rooms. Behind the Centre Block are a number of statues of important Canadian statesmen, and a walkway on top of the cliffs that features a gorgeous view of the Ottawa River and the City of Hull on the other side. Time was short, so we had to get back on the bus to make it to our next stop: a sightseeing cruise through the Thousand Islands, an archipelago about 80 km downstream from Kingston. Around 1800 islands dot the St. Lawrence River here, and in 2002 the Thousand Islands-Frontenac Arch region was designated a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. The most popular attraction on this cruise is Boldt Castle on Heart Island that was initiated by George Boldt, the wealthy Prussian-born owner of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in New York City. In 1900 Boldt started construction on one of the largest private residences in America as a gift to his wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt. However, construction was stopped in 1904 when she suddenly died. For the following 73 years the estate was abandoned and exposed to harsh weather and vandalism. In 1977 finally, the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority finally purchased Heart Island and has been restoring it ever since. Today the castle is a prime tourist attraction and has been furnished again since 2006, however, mostly with modern pieces. After our boat tour we got back on the bus and arrived back in Toronto in the early evening. Despite the very compressed schedule, our Eastern Canada tour had given us a great bird’s eye overview of some of the beautiful places that Eastern Canada has to offer. It gave us a few ideas of places to explore next time, when there is more time Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 12 Sep 2008
  • 1 254
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The last day of our Eastern Canada bus tour (August 10, 2008) started very early. After our early morning wakeup call we were scheduled for a 6:45 am departure. By mid-morning we had arrived in Ottawa where our first stop was at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. We had about an hour to explore the most visited museum in Canada which was nowhere near enough to really take in the various exhibits and interactive displays that showcase 20,000 years of human history. The Grand Hall welcomed us with its architectural grandeur and a dozen totem poles. In the First Peoples Hall we explored the history of Canada’s aboriginal peoples, and the Canada Hall illustrates Canadian history through a variety of recreated streetscapes that authentically reproduce different eras in Canada’s history. We did not have enough time to explore the fourth level where “Face to Face”, The Canadian Personalities Hall, introduces dozens of significant individuals that have shaped Canada’s history. Just before boarding our bus again I literally run outside the museum to quickly capture a picture of the stunning view of Ottawa’s Parliament Buildings across the river. Parliament Hill was indeed our next destination where we stopped right in front of the main entrance, the Queen’s Gates. During our 20 minute stop we had a chance to walk up to the Centre Block, constructed between 1865 and 1927, which contains the House of Commons and Senate Chambers as well as the Peace Tower and Library of Parliament. Flanking the wide quadrangle on the right is the East Block, housing the senator’s offices, and on the right side is the West Block, which contains ministers and MP’s offices and meeting rooms. Behind the Centre Block are a number of statues of important Canadian statesmen, and a walkway on top of the cliffs that features a gorgeous view of the Ottawa River and the City of Hull on the other side. Time was short, so we had to get back on the bus to make it to our next stop: a sightseeing cruise through the Thousand Islands, an archipelago about 80 km downstream from Kingston. Around 1800 islands dot the St. Lawrence River here, and in 2002 the Thousand Islands-Frontenac Arch region was designated a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO. The most popular attraction on this cruise is Boldt Castle on Heart Island that was initiated by George Boldt, the wealthy Prussian-born owner of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in New York City. In 1900 Boldt started construction on one of the largest private residences in America as a gift to his wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt. However, construction was stopped in 1904 when she suddenly died. For the following 73 years the estate was abandoned and exposed to harsh weather and vandalism. In 1977 finally, the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority finally purchased Heart Island and has been restoring it ever since. Today the castle is a prime tourist attraction and has been furnished again since 2006, however, mostly with modern pieces. After our boat tour we got back on the bus and arrived back in Toronto in the early evening. Despite the very compressed schedule, our Eastern Canada tour had given us a great bird’s eye overview of some of the beautiful places that Eastern Canada has to offer. It gave us a few ideas of places to explore next time, when there is more time Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 12 Sep 2008
  • 885
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Day two of our Eastern Canada bus tour started with an early morning wake-up call on August 9, 2008. For our 8 pm bus departure we did have enough time to go for a quick breakfast just steps from the Hotel Le Concorde where we had been staying. A quick stroll south on Rue Grande Allee Ouest, location of many restaurants and nightclubs, took us to a restaurant by the name of St. Hubert which featured an extensive breakfast buffet. Punctually at 8 am our bus drove us five minutes into the centre of Vieux Québec where we had about an hour and half to explore the old part of the city. I walked down into the old port area where historic limestone buildings house dozens of restaurants, boutiques and specialty shops. On Place de Paris I came across a TV shoot for the local weather station that featured the host of the show all dressed up in historic French attire, surrounded by a quartet of singers and several other extras, also sporting 17th century dresses. A walk on the waterfront allowed me to take in views across the St. Lawrence River as well as a glimpse back up to the majestic Chateau Frontenac. For $1.75 I took a ride in the funicular, which whisked me back up the hill to the Place d’Armes within mere seconds. Shortly before 10 am it was time to leave for our next destination: Montreal. After a quick lunch in St. Hyacinthe, we reached our first destination, the Olympic Stadium, at around 2 pm. We took the cable car up the tallest inclined tower in the world from where we enjoyed a perfect 360 degree view of the City. Right next to the Olympic Stadium we had a chance to visit the former Olympic veclodrom which was converted into the Montreal Biodome in 1992, a nature museum that features replicas of four eco-systems: a tropical South American rain forest, the Laurentian Forest, the Saint Lawrence Marine Eco-system and a polar area featuring animals from the Arctic and Antarctic. The penguin feeding was particularly popular among the audience. At our next stop we were able to admire the magnificent Notre-Dame Basilica and Place d’Armes in Old Montreal. The basilica was completed in the first half of the 19th century and upon its completion in 1843 it was the largest church in all of North America. Many famous people have visited this church: John Paul II visited the basilica in 1982 and raised its status to that of basilica, Celine Dion’s wedding took place here in 1994, and Pierre Trudeau’s funeral was held at Notre-Dame Basilica in 2000. Our next destination was St. Joseph’s Oratory, a Roman Catholic Basilica on the northern slopes of Mont Royal which features the third largest dome in the world. St. Joseph’s Oratory is one of Montreal’s most recognizable landmarks and the largest church in Canada. Brother André, a pious man from a poor family, whose prayers cured many, began building a small chapel on the slopes of Mount Royal in 1904. As word of his miraculous healing powers spread, he attracted funding from supporters from around the world which led to the construction of the imposing St. Joseph’s Oratory. Construction started in 1924 and was finally completed in 1967. The basilica holds Brother André’s tomb as well as his heart which is preserved in a reliquary. The church is dedicated to St. Joseph, to whom Brother André attributed all the miracles. A chapel houses thousands of votive candles and hundreds of walking sticks and canes that attest to the many miraculous healings that took place as a result of Brother André’s prayers. Pope John Paul II finally beatified Brother André in 1982. In the evening we checked into our central hotel, the Holiday Inn on Sherbrooke Street in downtown Montreal. For dinner we took a stroll over to Prince-Arthur Street, a popular pedestrian street that features a variety of restaurants. We enjoyed a sampling of Polish cuisine at Mazurka restaurant and headed back on Boulevard St-Laurent where dozens of dance clubs were attracting a crowd of stylish young people, ready to party the night away. We of course had to get to sleep for our 6:45 am departure the next day. Distributed by Tubemogul.
  • 11 Sep 2008
  • 392
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