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6:52
The 19th Annual International Women in Aviation (WAI) Conference is now history but statistics showed it to be the organization's biggest Conference ever, and both ANN and Aero-TV were there to cover it all. "By all accounts, this has been one heck of a successful Conference," said WAI President Dr. Peggy Chabrian. We couldn't agree more. Attendance reached a new high with 3,320 women and men registered. More than 250 of the Conference-goers were from the military, also a new record. The Exhibit Hall was the biggest ever with 151 separate companies and organizations on display, representing all aspects of the aviation community. $710,855 in scholarships was distributed to WAI members at every stage of life from university students to mature members seeking a mid-life career change to aviation. The WAI silent auction raised $28,000 for WAI's Endowment Fund, also a new record, bringing the total in the Endowment Fund to $563,000. The money in the Endowment Fund is used for scholarships. At the Conference, WAI and the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) announced a partnership for EAA AirVenture 2008 called WomenVenture, a series of seminars, speakers and networking events all week long at AirVenture 2008, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, to highlight both women's historical and contemporary role in aviation. WomenVenture culminates on Friday, August 1, with WAI's Celebrity Breakfast at the Nature Center on-site, followed by the gathering of the largest number of women pilots in history assembled at the show's AeroShell Square. "This is a dynamic time for Women in Aviation, International, as we continue in our mission to spread the word about the passion, excitement and career opportunities aviation offers to more and more women," said Dr. Chabrian. Plans are underway for the next International WAI Conference. "Ours is a Conference like no other. The positive energy here must be experienced to be believed," said Dr. Chabrian. The 20th Annual International Women in Aviation Conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta, Georgia, from February 26-28, 2009. Join Aero-TV For A Look At 2008's Annual Women In Aviation Conference! FMI: www.wai**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
22 Apr 2008
752
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5:15
A few weeks ago, Aero-TV traveled to Champaign, Illinois, to sample the delights of an all indoor radio-controlled model aircraft event known as E-Fest. It was quite the weekend and we, admittedly, had a great time seeing the best in small model aircraft. While many of the aircraft thrilled us to no end, it was the wild and seemingly non-aerodynamic antics of the RC helicopters that really got our attention. How they work, what you can do with them, and how you can get one for yourself, is the subject of this two part episode of Aero-TV. RC Helicopters were once given a tough rep... being billed as incredibly hard to fly, overtly expensive and endlessly complex. All that has changed - radically. In just the last few years, RC Helis, especially the electric versions, have come down aggressively in price, are available in just about EVERY RC hobby shop, and have become far more easy to fly. This has happened, in large part, due to better design, enhanced stability (and some devices that help them achieve this), and have quite simply become one of the fastest growing segments in model aviation. During the 2008 E-Fest, Aero-TV got the chance to look inside and outside a number of exciting new RV helo models to gain some insight into just how enticing and exciting these aircraft have become. Come Join Aero-TV As We Hover Along With The latest Generation of RC Helicopters. FMI: www.hobbico**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc. ALL Rights Reserved.
23 Apr 2008
2338
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6:38
A few weeks ago, Aero-TV traveled to Champaign, Illinois, to sample the delights of an all indoor radio-controlled model aircraft event known as E-Fest. It was quite the weekend and we, admittedly, had a great time seeing the best in small model aircraft. While many of the aircraft thrilled us to no end, it was the wild and seemingly non-aerodynamic antics of the RC helicopters that really got our attention. How they work, what you can do with them, and how you can get one for yourself, is the subject of this two part episode of Aero-TV. RC Helicopters were once given a tough rep... being billed as incredibly hard to fly, overtly expensive and endlessly complex. All that has changed - radically. In just the last few years, RC Helis, especially the electric versions, have come down aggressively in price, are available in just about EVERY RC hobby shop, and have become far more easy to fly. This has happened, in large part, due to better design, enhanced stability (and some devices that help them achieve this), and have quite simply become one of the fastest growing segments in model aviation. During the 2008 E-Fest, Aero-TV got the chance to look inside and outside a number of exciting new RV helo models to gain some insight into just how enticing and exciting these aircraft have become. Come Join Aero-TV As We Hover Along With The latest Generation of RC Helicopters. Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc. ALL Rights Reserved. FMI: www.hobbico****
18 Jan 2011
3030
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6:02
The Ultimate Backup Instrument? One of the most intriguing instruments that can go in your panel may be one of the most 'redundant' gauges to hit the industry. Mid-Continent Instrument's MCI 4300 AI offers incredible piece of mind to pilots who do a lot of flying in IMC and simply want more redundancy than most airframes already provide--especially in an age where a number of aircraft are being built "all-electric." Currently the only attitude indicator to offer a self-contained battery backup, the MCI 4300 AI provides one hour of emergency attitude reference -- no matter what happens to the aircraft's main power sources... including the airframe battery(s). GA manufacturers are taking notice with recent adoptions of the 4300 by industry heavyweights like Mooney and Piper, MCI is winning fast converts. The battery is a small add-on module that attaches to the back of the main AI chassis (see last photo below) and will need replacing every three years... a task made quite a bit easier by the means by which the battery unit was adapted externally to the main chassis, eliminating the need to tear the whole unit down for a battery change-over. Winter also emphasized the rugged nature of this unit... with a lengthy lifespan and the ability to weather even the most demanding aerobatic and helo operations -- tasks that normally eat gyros, with relish. The Lifesaver Gyro adds cost savings to its obvious safety benefits. It outlasts the nearest competition with a lifespan that's more than three times as long: 7,500 hours. It costs about two-thirds the price without the high installation and maintenance expense. Retrofit of aircraft is minimal with installation as simple as hooking up one standard connector. The 4300 Series Attitude Indicators are designed for use as primary or standby artificial horizon in helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. These dual voltage gyros offer 10-32 volt DC replacement for use in either 14 or 28 volt helicopters, have anti-reflective glass to enhance visibility and reduce pilot fatigue, and they outlast the nearest competition with a service life that's more than double the life of most electric gyros. FMI: www.mcico**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc. ALL Rights Reserved.
25 Apr 2008
372
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7:06
Upgraded Workhorse Includes More Powerful PT-6, Stylish Interior Part of ANN and Aero-TV's spring-time rites included covering one of the first public outings of the new Pilatus Aircraft PC-12 NG. Announced at NBAA 2006, Pilatus says the Next Generation program is the latest progression of the popular PC-12 turboprop. Receipt of joint EASA and FAA certification will allow deliveries of the PC-12 NG to begin immediately. Featuring a number of significant improvements -- including a fully integrated Honeywell Primus Apex avionics system, a completely new cockpit designed by BMW Group DesignworksUSA, and a more powerful Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67P engine -- the PC-12 NG sets the tone for the market sector, and is expected to broaden the appeal of the stylish workhorse turbine single. "Since original certification was achieved, the PC-12 has proven itself as a thoroughly reliable and robust aircraft," said Thomas Bosshard, CEO of Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. "With the arrival of the PC-12 NG we are witnessing the natural evolution of a product which continues to lead the field in both operating efficiency and performance." With the worldwide fleet numbering over 780 aircraft, the PC-12 NG continues to generate strong interest from operators worldwide. As businesses strive to operate as competitively as possible, the PC-12 NG’s versatility and low direct operating costs are more pertinent than ever before. Pilatus Aircraft Ltd was founded in 1939 and is currently world market leader in the manufacture and sale of single-engine turboprop aircraft. It is the only Swiss company that develops and produces private and training aircraft. FMI: www.pilatus-aircraft**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
25 Nov 2008
3594
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9:59
Are The Hard Times Behind Them? To all appearances, things would seem to be looking up at Liberty Aerospace. With the recently announced availability of the Aspen EFIS system, and the announcement of a new advanced XL2 Vanguard Edition, Liberty hopes to be one of the survivors in an increasingly problematic GA market. The latest model of the FADEC-equipped two seat touring and training aircraft offers a Gross Weight increase to 1,750 pounds, and toe-brakes, WAAS enabled Garmin GPS avionics, Jeppesen Terrain Database, and entry steps, as standard equipment. New optional avionics include the all-digital Aspen Evolution Pro Primary Flight Display (PFD) system, Garmin GTX 330 Transponder with Traffic Avoidance, and GPS-coupled S-TEC 30 Dual Axis Autopilot. An Insight True Flow 500 Fuel Flow Computer, coupled directly to the GPS for live in-flight fuel management, is also available. "After recently celebrating the delivery of Serial Number 100 of the Liberty XL2, we are excited to now launch this advanced model and reach another milestone in the continued development of the XL2," said Keith Markley, President and CEO of Liberty Aerospace. "The new gross weight allows a generous payload of 420 pounds with full fuel, and toe brakes will enable Flight Schools to offer more conformity in their training programs. Add WAAS-enabled GPS avionics with Traffic Avoidance for maximum utilization of our Certified IFR capability, and the FADEC equipped Vanguard XL2 pulls far away from what little competition we had in the certified two-place market." The Vanguard model also sports a new blue-tone decal design, and the entry steps offer easier access to the cabin over the wing. Finger brakes -- often preferred by private owners for their simplicity and ease of maintenance, but increasingly rare on training aircraft -- will still be available as optional equipment. Deliveries of the new model are expected to begin in early summer of this year. Come join Aero-TV as we get an update on the XL-2 program from the folks at liberty Aerospace. FMI: www.libertyaerospace**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
5 May 2008
752
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8:31
This Guy Has The Best Seat At EVERY Airshow He Flies! When the USAF Thunderbirds performed at the Kennedy Space Center last fall for the World Space Expo (where ANN served as the event's primary news team), it was a coveted chance for some of the best aviators in the world to make a historic landing at the home of the NASA Space Shuttle program. Helping the Air Force celebrate their 60th anniversary as a military service, the Thunderbirds put ion a show to remember, while ANN had the chance to work behind the scenes, in areas normally quite restricted, to see the "behind the scenes" action associated with putting one of the most consistently precise airshow performances on/over the earth. ANN talked with Thunderbird 4, Major Scott Poteet, about the Thunderbirds, current opportunities in the Air Force and the talented crew that supports him each and every time he flies. The World Space Expo was conceived so that NASA and the US Air Force could jointly celebrate 50 years of space and the 60th anniversary of the Air Force. The event took place from Nov. 1st to Nov. 4th, at the NASA Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The World Space Expo commemorated humanity's first 50 years in space while looking forward to returning people to the moon and exploring beyond. The Expo also showcased various panels, presentations and educational programs and was a part of NASA's 50th anniversary celebrations. The agency was founded Oct. 1, 1958. Expo highlights included a 45th Anniversary of the Mercury Program celebration featuring original NASA astronauts John Glenn and Scott Carpenter and the Pioneering Women of Aerospace forum featuring Eileen Collins and other prominent female space veterans. FMI: www.kennedyspacecenter****/worldspaceexpo, www.af.mil Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
2 May 2008
344
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6:36
The first in a five part series this week is also the first half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
5 May 2008
443
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6:09
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The Second in a five part series this week is also the other half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
6 May 2008
904
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7:46
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The third in a five part series, this week, starts off a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which will become the topic of its own program over the next three days. In this installment we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... after the airshow business was rocked by the loss of a favored team's sponsorship (the Red Barons), do airshows provide the kind of value necessary to keep attracting high level sponsorship??? In the next two parts, we'll address the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Three Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
10 May 2008
675
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8:58
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The fourth in a five part series, this week, continues with a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which will become the topic of its own program over the course of the week. In this installment, we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... in a computerized/new media/iPod kind of world can airshows provide the kind of entertainment and excitement that will allow them to keep up with the times??? In the next two parts, we'll address the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Three Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
8 May 2008
223
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7:34
Derks Looks To The Future With Excitement... And Caution The hard-working staff of AEA chalked up an amazing presentation with the close of the 51st Annual AEA Convention, concluded just days ago in the shadow of Washington, DC. Nearly 1,800 avionics and aviation industry professionals from more than 15 countries attending the Aircraft Electronics Association’s four-day event from April 23-26. According to Paula Derks, president of the AEA, this year’s convention was truly an international gathering of industry professionals. During the AEA’s annual convention, 25 new products were introduced; nearly 95 hours of training was offered; more than $135,000 in scholarships were awarded, which was a record high; and 98 companies — another record — were honored with the Avionics Training Excellence Award. “Our efforts in creating the pipeline of prospects for our academic members runs parallel with our effort to provide continuous regulatory and technical training once these technicians enter the field,” said Mike Adamson, vice president of member programs and education for the AEA. “These record numbers are indicative of the success AEA has had in being the preferred provider of training and education resources for the avionics and repair station community.” The AEA Trade Show portion of the event featured 144 exhibitors throughout the 72,000-square-foot exhibit hall at the Gaylord National Resort on the Potomac River. Other convention highlights included: • Honoring three international members with the AEA Lifetime Achievement Award • Newt Gingrich, former speaker of the House of Representatives, spoke to attendees during the AEA Annual Awards Luncheon. • EMTEQ was named the 2008 AEA Associate Member of the Year, and Gary Harpster of Duncan Aviation was named the 2008 AEA Member of the Year. In between technical and business training, the AEA offered regulatory updates sessions and various FAA panels. Regulatory agencies were significantly represented during the AEA’s convention, including participation from Nick Sabatini, associate administrator, Aviation Safety, and dozens of FAA and international program managers and field inspectors representing aviation on four different continents. “In our efforts for continuous improvement, the opportunity to meet with FAA leadership is priceless — both so that FAA headquarters can visit with industry, and also for industry to meet with the FAA decision-makers,” said Ric Peri, vice president of government and industry affairs for the AEA. “In order to be prepared for the future, this was a great opportunity to see what is coming on the radar screen.” Aero-TV covered this year's event AGGRESSIVELY... so, keep an eye out for DOZENS of programs that were generated from our attendance and coverage of this pivotal event... But first, let's start the ball rolling with our interview with AEA's accomplished President, Paula Derks. on ALL things avionics. FMI: www.aea**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
12 May 2008
709
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9:09
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The last in a five part series, this week, continues with a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which was the topic of its own program over the course of the week. In this final installment, we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... after a year in which there were a number of tragic but unrelated accidents, are airshows as safe as they can be??? Over the last few days, we addressed the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Five Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
13 May 2008
883
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7:31
The Annual gathering of the truly 'uber-professional' folks who populate the ultra-high-tech avionics business was a great success this year -- with outstanding attendance, accomplishments and achievements to be boasted about for years to come. But... who are these people and what do they get out of gathering each year? Aero-TV crews spent some time at the convention and on the exhibit floor to find out for ourselves. These are interesting people... and they belong to an equally interesting organization. Founded in 1957, the Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) represents more than 1,300 aviation businesses, including repair stations that specialize in maintenance, repair and installation of avionics and electronic systems in general aviation aircraft. AEA membership also includes instruments facilities, manufacturers of avionics equipment, instrument manufacturers, airframe manufacturers, test equipment manufacturers, major distributors, and educational institutions. AEA tells ANN that their mission is to be a worldwide, self-sustaining organization committed to enhancing the profitability of its members by... • providing effective leadership to its members, • facilitating the communications between members and with their various constituent groups, • encouraging members to establish quality processes, • furthering the education of its members and their various constituent groups, • influencing the applicable legislative and regulatory processes. Among those attending are a number of different types of members... Regular Members who may be an avionics or instrument facility with a Government-approved repair station. Applications for membership must include radio or instrument ratings, as well as a photocopy of their Certified Repair Station Certificate. Associate Members may be an avionics manufacturer, instrument manufacturer, test equipment manufacturer, airframe manufacturer, wire/cable manufacturer, major distributor, company dealing in used equipment, trade publications, accessory manufacturer, calibration lab, or consultant to the industry. This type of member must derive the majority of its gross revenues from the above activities. Air Carrier Members are usually a Part 121/135 operator. A FAR-145 CRS is required. A photocopy of their CRS certificate is required with the application. Academic Members include schools or college offering avionics or maintenance training. Delegated Engineering Authorities include any entity delegated to approve data on behalf of its respective regulatory authority. Professionals all, we really enjoyed spending a few days in April with them and look forward to AEA 2009! Til then, let's join Aero-TV as they meet the rank and file of the Aircraft Electronics Association at AEA 2008! FMI: www.aea**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
14 May 2008
501
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7:29
Garmin's Synthetic Vision System Heralds A New Age For GA! ANN, as you read last month, was privileged to finally be able to talk about something we've known about for a while... real-live Synthetic Vision for GA. As amazing as the concept may be, the reality is even more so. Garmin got this right... and right from the start. During a flight in an SVT-equipped DA40-XL, Aero-TV flew checked out each of the now-certified features of the G1000's SVT capabilities -- Highway In The Sky, Obstacle Clearance, Terrain Avoidance, Traffic Alerts... you name it... and came away feeling like the state of the art in the general aviation industry has just been raised by an astounding degree. And if you can wait about 24 hours, for the next Special Edition of Aero-TV, you'll see that they're not remotely done yet... but we can't say anymore about that... yet. Garmin's Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT), is designed to fully integrate with the G1000... both present and past models. Garmin's SVT presents a 3D depiction of terrain, obstacles and traffic on the G1000's primary flight-display (PFD) so that the avionics panel replicates what pilots would see outside the cockpit on a clear day. Garmin's SVT blends information about the aircraft's position with topographic databases to create and display real-time 3D images. The information is presented on the G1000's large flight displays with XGA (1,024x768-pixel) resolution, superior sunlight readability and wide viewing angles. SVT presents the necessary information in ways that are easy to understand so pilots feel at ease interpreting the information. The foundation of SVT is the depiction of 3D terrain, which is displayed on the PFD(s). Land, water and sky are clearly differentiated with shading and textures that are similar to the topographical colors found on the multi-function display (MFD) moving map. SVT works seamlessly to alert pilots of potential ground hazards by displaying terrain and obstacles which pose a threat to the aircraft with appropriate TAWS alert coloring. Those flying with a TAWS-B enabled (optional) G1000 avionics suite also have the benefit of receiving voice alerts. Terrain warnings are also depicted on the MFD with a traditional, color-coded "X" symbol. If the aircraft does not have TAWS-B enabled, reduced capability AC 23-26 compliant terrain alerting is included with SVT. Pilots will also appreciate SVT's pathways, or Highway-In-The-Sky (HITS) guidance. Depicted as 3D "flying rectangles", pathway guidance symbols help pilots stay on course when flying en route legs, VNAV legs, GPS/WAAS vertical approach procedures, ILS approach procedures, and arrival and departure procedures. When on an ILS approach, pilots will take advantage of Garmin's patent-pending system whereby SVT relies on ILS signals to position the pathway. Therefore, when pilots fly through the SVT boxes on an ILS approach, they will automatically fly the precision glideslope. Pathways may be enabled or disabled via a PFD softkey. SVT also brings MFD enhancements. At the nose of the MFD's aircraft graphic, pilots will see the field of view scan (45-degrees lateral scan) and flight path predictor that displays the aircraft's anticipated flight path. SVT is expected to be available on G900X-equipped aircraft by July 2008, and on the G1000 King Air C90 retrofit in 2009. Integration of SVT into existing G1000 systems or yet-to-be-delivered G1000 equipped aircraft is being coordinated with each aircraft manufacturer. Come Fly Along With Aero-TV As We Test Garmin's Amazing Synthetic Vision Technology FMI: www.garmin****/aviation
19 May 2008
1322
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Full Garmin Avionics Suite Now Offered On New SR22-G3s ANN REALTIME SPECIAL REPORT 05.20.08 0500 EDT: We don't mean to overstate the importance of the following news item... but this is a marriage many in the aviation industry have been waiting for. Cirrus Design and Garmin International announced Tuesday at EBACE 2008 that the Duluth, MN planemaker will offer Cirrus Perspective -- an all-glass, fully-integrated flight deck tailored by Garmin specifically for the SR22-G3. "Cirrus and Garmin have worked together since the development of the first SR20 in the late 1990s when the GNS 430 was selected for the SR20's panel, and we are very excited to expand our relationship," said Gary Kelley, Garmin's vice president of marketing. "Both companies are equally committed to bringing customers a safe and quality aircraft, and we are confident Cirrus pilots will enjoy flying with Garmin's industry leading, all-glass integrated flight deck." Check Out Aero-TV's FLIGHT TEST In The Cirrus SR22 G3-GTSX... With Perspective!!! "As a pilot, you sit in a cockpit and experience the world in ways others can only imagine. So naturally, as leaders in technology and innovation, Cirrus and Garmin sat in the cockpit together and worked to truly redesign the pilot-airplane interface" said Cirrus CEO Alan Klapmeier. "Ultimately, with Cirrus Perspective pilots fly smoother, smarter and safer." Cirrus Perspective isn't "just" a G1000 panel fitted to an SR22... but rather a fully integrated, model-specific avionics platform. All information -- from aircraft attitude and air data to engine instrumentation, real-time weather data link, traffic and terrain -- is integrated and digitally depicted on the 12-inch primary flight display (PFD) and multi-function display (MFD). ANN Editor-In-Chief Jim Campbell test flew the fully-equipped airplane recently for ANN and Aero-TV and noted that, "This is the real deal... right here and right now, this has to be the most capable GA piston single in the business. The avionics/airframe integration is exquisitely executed and the airplane truly surpases our great expectations for the 'latest and greatest' of the Cirrus line. I really can't wait to see someone top this... but no matter who does it, the entire industry benefits when companies like Cirrus keep raising the bar. While some may call it a party trick, the addition of the "LVL" capability is going to be (at least) a major convenience and possibly a life-saver. The Dual AHRS, beefed up electrical system, magnificently monstrous displays, and those GREAT new seats make this a really cool way to fly. The airplane just plain defines what is now state of the art for GA." The Perspective is the first single engine piston aircraft with an all-glass Garmin cockpit to utilize dual, solid-state Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) that can align while in motion, including in-flight dynamic restarts. This turbine aircraft style architecture provides Cirrus pilots with an extra level of redundancy and safety. Perspective cockpits also include seamless integration of Garmin's GFC 700 automatic flight control system. This standard two-axis autopilot (three-axis autopilot optional) makes it possible for pilots to maintain airspeed references and optimize performance over the entire airspeed envelope. New features of the autopilot system include increased roll and pitch engagement attitudes. Cirrus Perspective will also come standard with Garmin's Synthetic Vision Technology, which presents a 3D depiction of terrain, obstacles and traffic on the PFD. SVT includes helpful features like a flight path marker (displays projected path of the aircraft), Pathways (Garmin's implementation of highway-in-the-sky), and unique runway highlighting and airport signs. With the system already certified by the FAA, Cirrus expects deliveries of SR22-G3 Perspective-equipped aircraft to begin next month. FMI: www.cirrusdesign****, www.garmin**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
20 May 2008
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