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1:38
*******www.ForestWander**** Interview of a University Biologist Professor at Twinn Falls Resort State Park in West Virgnia.
1 May 2008
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1:26
Relentless in his pursuit to save endangered species across the globe since 1952, the world’s pre-eminent field biologist, George B. Schaller, Ph.D., has been named the 2008 recipient of the Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. In recognition for his lifetime achievements, Dr. Schaller will receive $100,000 and the Lilly Medal at a gala ceremony presented by the AES Corporation and hosted by award-winning actress and environmentalist Jane Alexander on Sept. 27, 2008, in Indianapolis. As Senior Conservationist for the Wildlife Conservation Society, Dr. Schaller’s successes are numerous, including his recent work with the endangered Tibetan antelope or chiru – at times slaughtered for its exquisite wool used to make shahtoosh shawls. He trekked a thousand miles across Tibet’s rugged Chang Tang Reserve to study the chiru, wild yak and other wildlife and make recommendations to the Chinese government. Schaller now strives to save Marco Polo sheep, snow leopards and other wildlife and assist the nomadic local people in achieving a measure of harmony between rangelands, livestock and wildlife. He is also working to create an international peace park in the four corners of Pakistan, Afghanistan, China and Tajikistan. To view Multimedia News Release, go to *******www.prnewswire****/mnr/indianapoliszoo/32853/
14 May 2008
1565
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2:03
Puerto Vallarta Biologist Oscar Aranda Mena talks about the Eco Tour Dolphins Canopy Iguanas Whales Forest Crocodiles Turtles. The full story and more video on BanderasNews and PVNN. Video by Promovision - Maker Video Production Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Puerto Vallarta Video Produccion Promovision - Maker. Delfines Canopy Selva Ballenas Safari Tortugas Buceo y mas.
28 Sep 2007
553
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2:33
Puerto Vallarta Biologist Oscar Aranda Mena talks about the Eco Tour Dolphins Canopy Iguanas Whales Forest Crocodiles Turtles. The full story and more video on BanderasNews and PVNN. Video by Promovision - Maker Video Production Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Puerto Vallarta Video Produccion Promovision - Maker. Delfines Canopy Selva Ballenas Safari Tortugas Buceo y mas.
28 Sep 2007
2265
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2:52
Puerto Vallarta Biologist Oscar Aranda Mena talks about the Eco Tour Dolphins Canopy Iguanas Whales Forest Crocodiles Turtles. The full story and more video on BanderasNews and PVNN. Video by Promovision - Maker Video Production Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Puerto Vallarta Video Producciones Promovision - Maker. Delfines Canopy Selva Ballenas Safari Tortugas Buceo y mas.
10 Oct 2007
2287
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3:17
*******SupremeMasterTV**** - Renowned biologist cites tragic biodiversity loss. Harvard University Professor and two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and ecologist Edward Wilson warns that biodiversity on Earth is suffering from drastic loss. With just under two million species currently catalogued, an estimated 30 million exist. And although 183 species have been formally declared extinct since the beginning of the last century, Dr. Wilson states that this number is a vast underestimate, with annual extinctions more likely in the neighborhood of 20-30,000 species.
3 Jan 2010
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1:44
Brazilian biologist and Photographer Lye Otani tells us why she chose to go to New Zealand and take the applied business course offered by NZIE.
19 Jun 2017
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7:08
www.watchseinfeldonline****
28 Sep 2011
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4:24
Sharks are let you in ocean but are attacked by something very strange
8 Oct 2018
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2:05
Bird strikes are a big problem at Sacramento International Airport. Biologists hope to reduce mid-air collisions using non-lethal methods but officials want to continue using lethal force when necessary. Video by Andy Alfaro / Sacramento Bee. To see a higher resolution video, please visit *******videos.sacbee****
6 Feb 2009
344
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2:29
Starred Review. Owls permeate literature and mythology, an ancient animal ("some 97 million years" old) that has fascinated for centuries; still, few people have had as intimate an encounter with the mysterious night birds as biologist O'Brien. As a student researcher at Caltech, she fell in love with an injured four-day-old barn owl and seized the opportunity to adopt him permanently. She named him Wesley, and for 19 years kept, cared for and studied him, forging a tremendous relationship with the still-wild animal, as well as a vast understanding of his abilities, instincts and habits: "He was my teacher, my companion, my child, my playmate, my reminder of God." Her heartwarming story is buttressed by lessons on owl folklore, temperament ("playful and inquisitive"), skills, and the brain structure that gives them some amazing abilities, like spotting a mouse "under three feet of snow by homing in on just the heartbeat." It also details her working life among fellow scientists, a serious personal health crisis, and the general ins and outs of working with animals. This memoir will captivate animal lovers and, though not necessarily for kids, should hold special appeal for Harry Potter fans who've always envied the boy wizard his Hedwig. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
18 Aug 2009
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1:48
From SpongeBob Squarepants’ loyal sidekick to a doctor’s office near you -- starfish just might be the next big thing in medicine. One of the marine biologists involved in the research explains the concept to a BBC reporter. HUGHES: “Well, it produces a kind of slime over its body surface and this slime contains chemicals that prevent other animals and plants from sticking to it. And it’s possible that if we can identify these chemicals, it might be possible to incorporate them into medicine. Perhaps to fight inflammatory diseases.” Whereas man-made objects put into the ocean are quickly covered in oceanic microbes and various undesirables, the spiny starfish’s slime keeps its surface pristine. A writer for Mother Nature Network explains how this property would help humans suffering from conditions like asthma or arthritis. “Inflammation is caused by an excess of white blood cells sticking to the blood-vessel wall, building up and eventually causing tissue damage. If the researchers can develop a treatment based on starfish slime that effectively coats human blood vessels much like the slime coats starfish, they believe they could prevent white blood cells from accumulating in vessels, thus stopping inflammation.” And a Daily Mail reporter says starfish goop could be just as effective as more traditional treatments, such as prescription steroids -- and perhaps more desirable. “This could reduce the amount of drugs patients would need to take, which often have unwanted side effects. Professor Clive Page ... said: 'The starfish have effectively done a lot of the hard work for us. 'It has had billions of years in evolution to come up with molecules that do specific things.’” And starfish slime might just be the tip of the iceberg. Researchers are reportedly exploring the medical benefits of sea snails, sea cucumbers, and seaweed.
11 Dec 2010
570
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2:19
BY MIRANDA WHEATLEY You're watching multisource science video news analysis from Newsy. “And now please show them your teeth Kermit! Uh, Grover. Uh, Grover. I was going to say to you, you know how I’m a frog, you know, well frogs do not have teeth Grover, no teeth. Open your mouth!” (YouTube/Sesame Workshop) Almost everything you learn on Sesame Street is true. But on this one, Kermit’s got it wrong. Of nearly six thousand known species of frogs, a new study out of Stony Brook University suggests there’s actually one with a set of real-life chompers. And that is spawning a conversation about evolution -- trait RE-evolution, to be exact. Take a look at all the species that don’t have teeth. According to the 19th Century Dollo’s Law, when a species loses a trait - like humans did tails - it never comes back. But these biologists say they’ve found a frog with teeth on both jaws - a trait not seen in some 200 million years. (Video from: National Geographic) The tooth-frog species’ name is Gastrotheca guentheri and lives primarily in the Andean forests of Colombia and Ecuador. Head scientist John tells the BBC, analyzing frog fossils and DNA sequences helped him prove his theory. “Dr Wiens believes that this re-evolution can be considered a ‘loophole' in Dollo's law. … ‘What G. guentheridid was to put teeth back on the lower jaw, rather than having to re-evolve all the mechanisms for making teeth 'from scratch'...’” And The Frog Blog says the frog’s set of teeth isn’t the first example of re-evolution.... “...scientists have identified and debated several attributes that have apparently ‘re-evolved’ over time including stick insect's wings … and lost digits in lizards.” But as Wiens points out in his study - those examples have been subject to speculation. Wiens’ research is considered a solid challenge to Dollo’s Law - and a blogger for Science 2.0 says it’s time to shake things up. “...Dollo's law stated that complex traits lost cannot come back, evolution is irreversible - well, so what? It's been a long time since 1890 when paleontologist Louis Dollo asserted that and it was never a law anyway, it was just a hypothesis.” Wiens says the re-evolution of Gastrotheca guentheri’s lower teeth took some 20 million years to come back, so Kermit might just have to wait awhile for that perfect smile. Get more science video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
12 Feb 2011
563
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2:44
Merlin Tuttle founded Bat Conservation International (BCI), an organization devoted to research, education and conservation of bats, in 1982. When Tuttle retired in 2009 from nearly 30 years of service as its Executive Director, BCI employed 32 biologists, educators, and administrators, supported by 11,000 members in 60 countries. Under Merlin’s leadership BCI gained permanent protection for many of the world’s largest remaining bat populations, sponsored research to document the vital ecological and economic roles of bats, trained hundreds of wildlife managers in bat research and conservation techniques, and vastly improved the public’s perception of bats. Merlin’s photographs have appeared in five National Geographic articles, more than a dozen National Geographic Society books and other magazines, and was included in their prestigious publication, 100 Best Pictures. Merlin continues to assist conservationists, provide lectures, photograph bats worldwide in addition to leading his newest organization, Merlin Tuttle’s Bat Conservation. "Merlin Tuttle, the world's most famous bat biologist and booster, has devoted his life to studying, demystifying, and helping conserve bats." -National Geographic Magazine
31 Mar 2017
258
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