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1:47
cnc dik işleme
2 Dec 2009
358
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3:36
Here is a CNC Project that is shot in a tutorial sequence. It goes from the Design, CAD, CAM, Control, CNC Plasma Cutting and then final assembly. Check out this CNC How-To to learn how to make a stomp pad for your snowboard. Learn a little about CNC Design, CNC Programming, G-Codes, and CNC Plasma Cutting.
2 Dec 2007
1922
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5:28
In this next video we go over the design of the CNC Stomp Pad. We use Adobe Illustrator to sketch it out. We prepare something that a CNC Plasma Cutter could follow. We prepare and think for the next step which is bringing the design into CAD. We also keep CNC Programming and our G-Code in mind.
2 Dec 2007
4393
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4:25
In this CNC Tutorial Video we go over the design in CAD. We resize it to our dimensions and then convert it into a DXF File. Finally the DXF File is ready for CAM. There are many things you should look at while in the CAD phase. Mainly you need to know you design is exactly correct. If you don't you will just have errors and waste downstream in the CNC Process.
4 Dec 2007
1654
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6:29
Here we set the CAM Programming parameters in SheetCam. Next we finalize the G-Code for the project. You also get a quick look at some CNC Post-Processing. CAM Programs really save you a ton of time when you go to set up your programming. I can't imagine doing any of this by hand. They also give you a lot of flexibility in how you machine and your machining order. I should also mention I love SheetCam as a CAM Software Program for plasma cutting.
2 Dec 2007
3162
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5:46
In this video we go through Mach 3 to look over the g-code before we plasma cut. We are checking to see if we have any problems before we go to the CNC Plasma Cutter. We want to see all interior cuts first and then the exterior cut. We are basically checking for bugs.
2 Dec 2007
3130
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4:58
During this CNC Video Segment we sand our CNC Stomp Pad with a Dual Action (DA) sander. We are taking out any deep scratches and giving it a matte finish. The CNC Plasma Cut part then is taken over to a stand. We look at different traction spikes and how they will look. After selecting a spike type, we start laying them out. We layout some marks where we will drill holes in the next video.
16 Dec 2007
969
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5:16
In this video we drill the holes in our CNC Stomp Pad. We need to add the traction spikes and they are really a screw and nut. We drill the holes then clean them out. We bend the stomp pad while drilling and we must hammer it flat next. A quick DA Sanding to make the pad look good, then we are on the the next step which is finalizing the CNC stomp pad.
17 Dec 2007
2288
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5:46
Here is the final video in the CNC Stomp Pad Tutorial Video Series. In this video, we go over the final assembly of the stomp pad. Then we watch as we used double sided tape to adhere it to the snowboard. Finally we take a look at some final photos of the CNC Stomp Pad on the Snowboard. One Final Note: The Stomp Pad works perfectly. I love the fact you can customize your life with CNC. See you on the slopes, Ivan Irons
17 Dec 2007
4395
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3:34
Here is the first video in the Learn CNC Basics E-Course from www.CNCInformation****. This video outline what the e-course is and what it covers. The video also talks about the 5 steps to working with CNC. The steps are CNC Design, CAD, CAM, Control and Machineing. Every CNC project has these steps and they must be followed in that order. This gives the beginner a basic framework to hang their new CNC Information on. As the beginner learn they can think about these 5 steps and where the new information fits. The next video in the E-Course is CNC Design.
21 Dec 2007
4165
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5:01
In this CNC ECourse Video we go over the first step in the CNC Process. The first step is CNC Design. During CNC Design you are thinking of things like: What size will it be? What material will it be made of? Who is the customer? What will it be used for? Before I design I like to sketch a few ideas out on paper. I like to toy with different ideas to spark my creativity. This is the equivalent of brainstorming. When I really get my juices flowing, that is when my best designs rise to the top. I generally carry around a notebook with me to note designs that I think of during the day.
21 Dec 2007
2738
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6:38
In this CNC Basics Video we go over CAD. CAD Stands for Computer Aided Design. During the CAD step we take our initial design and translate it into the computer. We do this CNC Step so we can change the design, resize it, save it, transfer it to someone else, etc. Recording our CNC Design into CAD gives us flexibility. During CAD we learn we first design parts, then assemblies, then groups, then machines. We also learn there are different types of CAD Software. 2D, 2.5D and 3D. These types also come in different software packages from inexpensive to expensive. You can spend up to the sky if you want. The trick is to match the CAD Software Capabilites with your CNC Needs. You don't need high power 3D Modeling CAD if you make simple parts day in and day out. Tomorrow's lesson is CAM. Computer Aided Manufacturing.
5 Apr 2009
2352
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7:15
Here on the 4th day we talk about CAM. CAM stands for Computer Aided Manufacturing. During the CAM step of the CNC Process we use software to define how our CNC Machine should move. There are a number of CAM Software packages on the market. They range from the inexpensive to expensive. Much of the cost depends on the number of Axis's that the CAM Software has. With the CAM Software we define things like stock, location, tooling, feed and speeds and the post processor we will use. The post processor is very specific to our CNC Machine. It outputs g-code. We use the G-Code program in our control software next. Tomorrow's Lesson is CNC Control.
12 Nov 2008
2178
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7:18
Day 5 is all about CNC Control. CNC Control is made up of three parts. The CNC Control Computer, CNC Control Software and the actually CNC Controller. The CNC Control Computer can be basic and inexpensive. The computer will live in a harsh environment that includes dust and dirt. The CNC Control Software is what processes the G-Code program we made in the last step. You load it in and when you are ready, start the program. The actual CNC Controller has drivers in it and translates the signals from the control program into motion. It sends the signals on to stepper or servo motors that move the various axis All together these pieces can cost a lot or a little. You can also cut down the cost if you build the cnc controller yourself. Tomorrow we machine. This is where the chips fly.
27 Jun 2008
2067
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