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1:57
BY DAN CORNFIELD ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource sports news analysis from Newsy The University of Connecticut Huskies stand atop the college basketball world once again. UConn defeated Butler 53-41 to claim the NCAA Men’s National Championship. Rivals-Yahoo's Jeff Eisenberg says Butler’s head coach couldn’t find a way to put points on the board. Eisenberg - “Stevens never could have imagined how poorly his Bulldogs would handle Uconn’s stingy defense... They shot a title game record-low 18.8 percent from the field... The historically inept shooting performance was a tragic way for eigth-seeded Butler’s fairytale NCAA tournament run to end.” So was it great defense or woeful shooting? Jay Bilas tells ESPN its equal parts credit and blame. Bilas - “I think it would be fair to say that both defenses are very good, but the truth is no defense is that good. The offenses were horrendous. Especially in the first half, both offenses were horrendous. In the second half, I thought UConn made some nice adjustments.” Guard Kemba Walker led the Huskies to championships in the Big East Tournament and the big dance. But Connecticut head coach Jim Calhoun is the one under the biggest spotlight. The NCAA penalized Calhoun for recruiting violations by a UConn booster this year. Gary Parrish for CBSSports**** says Calhoun is suspended the first three Big East conference games of next season. Parrish - The Huskies aren’t the best national champion ever, but they might be the most fitting. At a time when criticism of the NCAA has reached an all-time high... basketball’s national champion is coached by a man whose program was punished by the NCAA six weeks ago. So while the Huskies celebrate in confetti, some are already putting an asterisk next to the championship and the coach. Calhoun is now among elite company as one of only five coaches to win three NCAA National Championships. But Rivals-Yahoo's Jason King says Calhoun's new status will be overshadowed by the looming threat of more NCAA violations. King - “I still don’t think it would be enough to erase some of the negative things that have occurred at his program over the last year. I think those things are going to tarnish his legacy forever unfortunately. It’s a shame because he has proven to be a great, great basketball coach.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
546
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2:05
BY DAN CORNFIELD You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy Republican or Independent? Doesn’t seem to matter. Donald Trump is shaking the base of the 2012 Presidential campaign, telling the Wall Street Journal Monday he’d consider running as an independent if he doesn’t win the GOP nod. Trump - “I think that the Republican party likes very much that I am running right now as a Republican... The concern is if I don’t win will I run as an Independent and the answer is probably yes.” Trump has not officially announced his candidacy yet because of contractual programs with his NBC show, The Apprentice. But he is expected to throw his hat into the race before June. NBC’s Carrie Dann notes, a campaign regardless of party may have trouble even getting off the ground. Dann - “While Trump could certainly deploy his news-cycle monopolizing publicity if he decided to run, the requirement that candidates publish a lengthy financial disclosure statement could preclude the business magnate from participating in the race.” CNN’s Alexander Mooney says the odds have always been stacked against a 3rd party candidate, but the real estate mogul thinks he could be different. Mooney - “But Trump – who has already spent years making sure people know who he is and has vowed to spend hundreds of millions of his own fortune if he runs – says he could win without the GOP banner behind him.” Not everyone agrees. Fox News’ Bill Kristol says Trump as an Independent candidate would have the same effect as other famous 3rd party candidates in the 1990’s. Kristol - “I think most Republicans I’ve talked to would prefer not to have a Donald Trump-like, Ross Perot-like, 3rd Party Candidate. Perot helped Clinton in ‘92 and ‘96 and Trump might help Obama in 2012.” The Wall Street Journal’s Jerry Seib agrees, and says if Trump runs solo he would be gift-wrapping 2012 for President Obama. Seib - “If Donald Trump wants to run as an Independent, first of all he’s not going to win. Secondly, whatever votes he gets comes out of the anti-Obama vote. It’s just a god send to the Democrats if he wants to do that. And if he’s got plenty of money to spend in the process, even better.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Tramscript by Newsy
16 Apr 2011
508
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2:38
ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY BY DAN CORNFIELD You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy The fighting between rebels and pro-government forces in Libya moved into its third month with no major advances. The battle for control of the country is now widely described as a stalemate, but BBC’s Jon Leyne reports that despite NATO involvement and air strikes, the ground war rages on. Leyne- This is urban warfare of the nastiest kind... on the one hand you have the rebels fighting the government and on the other government forces appear to be randomly shelling and using sniper fire in civilian areas. Rebel forces continue to hold the port city of Misrata', but are under constant fire. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen explains the mentality among Gadhafi’s forces as they continue to shell the port city. Pleitgen- At this point in time, they don’t feel very much threatened by the rebels, they also don’t feel very much threatened by NATO. They feel that they also have a lot of reserves in their military. One of the interesting things they’ve told me is that of course Libya has military reserves like any other country, they haven’t called those up yet. So it looks like stalemate really is the right word in all of this. There is very little movement on the front. France has said NATO is not doing enough while Great Britain urges the United States to increase its air support of the rebels. According to the Wall Street Journal, the ongoing stalemate is good for Gadhafi. “As the conflict drags on, Gadhafi is playing for a stalemate that leaves him in control of Tripoli and other coastal cities, buying time to fight another day. The Gadhafis last week put forward a peace entreaty... The opposition Transitional National Council rejected this laughable plan outright, but one of these days the rebels may be pressured to strike a deal.” Some governments including Qatar and Italy support the supply of arms to the rebels. Maj. General Bob Scales (Ret.) tells Fox News that unless the rebels regain momentum, Gadhafi could wipe out the rebel forces. Scales- “From a military perspective it’s a stalemate. Now we haven’t talked about the psychological impact, the economic and the political pressure on Gadhafi, but if you look at strictly from what we military guys call ground truth, its clearly at best a stalemate or sadly it may very well be shifting over to Gadhafi’s favor.” Stalemate could lead to a long-term civil war. The Christian Science Monitor points out a stalemate could be the worst possible outcome. “A divided Libya with Qaddafi holding on in Tripoli sends shudders down the spine. Entrenched civil war would likely only continue, opening the door to regional instability. The United States warns of another Somalia in the making, a failed state of lawlessness and chaos that serves as a launching pad for pirates and terrorists.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Apr 2011
679
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2:38
BY DAN CORNFIELD ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. It’s been 27 years since the Alzheimer’s Association issued its last set of guidelines for identifying and defining Alzheimer’s disease. Now, researchers have new data which has separated the disease into three stages. The Pre-clinical stage is the time up to 10 years before any symptoms occur. Stage two, Cognitive Impairment, refers to the stage when mild signs begin to become prevalent. Finally, Dementia is the period most people are familiar with, when memory and brain function suffer the most. Dr. Jennifer Ashton breaks down the logic behind the new guidelines for CBS’ Early Show. Ashton- “Well the bulk of research Chris, in Alzheimer’s disease, is really centering on that Preclinical phase ... The thinking now is that Alzheimer’s disease really represents a progressive disorder that really exists on a continuum or spectrum of time where people can have disease way before it’s actually apparent...” Once the disease is properly identified, CNN’s Madison Park says a patient has more options and possibilities. Park- “Current therapies usually don't make much difference. The aim of identifying the disease earlier is to get patients in the pipeline for research for future treatment. When the disease isn't identified until later in its progression, patients are more impaired and treatments are even less effective.” While the medical world is excited about the new progress, Dr. Marc Siegel tells Fox News, patients and doctors need to be cautious about using the new guidelines. He argues this is a step in the right direction, but not a medical breakthrough. Siegel- “You can already see a downside to this because you might be saying as I’m saying this, you might be thinking well wait a minute, what about people getting misdiagnosed with Alzheimer’s? Especially since we don’t have any good, proven treatments to offer them yet. So this is more of a research tool in my opinion.” The new guidelines were released just as Capitol Hill debates how to provide better care for Alzheimer’s patients. A writer for the New York Times explains how even the current budget fight could affect Alzheimer’s research. “The drive to diagnose Alzheimer’s before it has progressed into profound dementia is also reflected in a bill introduced in Congress this month, which would create specific Medicare cost codes for Alzheimer’s diagnosis, including steps involving discussions between the patient’s doctor and caregivers, a recognition that keeping family members well-informed can result in better planning and care.” That wasn’t the only study released this week on Alzheimer's. Another found pre-Alzheimer patients struggled with simple things -- like detecting little white lies. “Healthy older participants did fine at distinguishing the truth from lies. But older adults with dementia affecting their frontal lobes — the seat of judgment and self-control in the brain — had a hard time telling the difference between sarcasm, lies and truth.” Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your stream. Get more multisource health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
23 Apr 2011
492
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2:25
BY DAN CORNFIELD ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. It has been twenty-five years since the tragedy at Chernobyl Nuclear power plant. Scientists, world leaders, and some witnesses of the chaos look back and ahead on the 25th Anniversary. NPR’s David Greene spoke with one man who was part of the emergency crew that fought the fire in Chernobyl in 1986. "A quarter-century later, no one knows what their heroism cost. Of the 20 men in Kotlyar's fire brigade, four have died. One man had a brain tumor, another leukemia. And Kotlyar is convinced at least that those two died because of radiation." Memorials were held Tuesday across Eastern Europe for those who died. But in the wake of the recent nuclear crisis in Japan, Aljazeera reports the issues reach further than the medical risks of radiation. The report reflects the delayed alarms following the original explosion and the controversial care given to those affected ever since. "It cast a dark shadow over humanity, one unseen since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. But, unlike Japan's Fukushima nuclear crisis, Chernobyl's real lesson is not about nuclear-plant safety. It is about official arrogance and indifference to suffering, and a cult of secrecy that allows information to be shared only among a narrow elite obsessed with stability.” Russian President Dimitry Medvedev announced his plan to increase security of nuclear power stations at the G8 summit this May. The sentiment reflects the hopes of Ukrainian leaders to continue to use nuclear power safely. “Ukrainian authorities are optimistic about the future of nuclear energy. Four plants with 15 reactors produce nearly half the country’s electricity. Controversially, the plan is to build a dozen more in the next 20 years.” But while some look forward, PBS’s Miles O’Brien points out the Chernobyl cleanup is far from over. "Ukraine is asking the west for $800 million to pay for a new shelter over the old sarcophagus that would last 100 years. Beneath it is all is a molten witch's brew of radioactive isotopes, including plutonium, with a half-life of 24,000 years.. Do you think human beings are capable of keeping this thing safe for tens of thousands of years?" Gennadi Milinevsky: "If he covers it, will try to keep it safe. But this place, this area will be still not good for life." Miles O'Brien: "Forever?" Gennadi Milinevsky: "Yes. Forever, yes." Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
30 Apr 2011
1100
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2:14
BY DAN CORNFIELD You're watching multisource sports video news analysis from Newsy. Most football fans breathed a collective sigh of relief when the NFL lockout was lifted... only to find themselves in even murkier water. A federal judge this week ruled in favor of the players. While the owners seek an appeal, the interim stability has left a climate of uncertainty. "I think there are a lot things in the litigation that concern me about the future of the game. And I've been very clear about that. I think the challenges to the draft, the challenges to free agency restriction, all of those things threaten what we have built and that everybody loves." Bleacher Report’s Tom Kinslow paints a far starker picture, likening the current labor relations status to bedlam. “With the lockout behind us, it's open season, and in reality, it's more like chaos. We're in uncharted waters here and all of us are learning on the fly as the league proceeds after the end of the lockout. The rules are in flux and if a team wants to make a trade... on draft day, there's no one stopping teams from getting it done.” With a temporary peace, players had a choice to make. Some players, like those on the Detroit Lions, are still staying away from facilities. Others, namely the Pittsburgh Steelers and New York Giants, allowed players to show up to work. Fox Business and HLN say this will undoubtedly lead to more litigation down the road. “But you have got to remember, Many of these players receive off-season workout bonuses, so in order to avoid any issues down the road, a lot of them showed up to work Tuesday, only to be turned away by security. Others were allowed in the building, but were then told they could not work out, just a crazy situation.” “So they want to show up, they want to get their money and there’s going to be lawsuits there as well, to say, well, there were a few days here perhaps where there wasn’t a lockout. I came, I was prepared to work out. And now I want my money, I have been damaged.” For now, the case goes to the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals. Some believe the higher court is more likely to side with ownership. Either way, Sports Illustrated’s Peter King thinks a bargaining agreement won’t get done before kickoff this fall, meaning football could resume under the 2010 contract rules. “Even though I don’t think there’s going to be a new deal done between the players and owners by opening day, I do think there will be an opening day because the court came down so strongly on the part of the players.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for sports video news updates in your feed. Get more multisource sports video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
30 Apr 2011
438
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2:27
BY DAN CORNFIELD ANCHOR ALEX ROZIER You're watching multisource U.S. news analysis from Newsy In route from Memphis to Charlotte for a conference on Islamaphobia, two Muslim clerics were pulled off a Delta flight before takeoff. The pilot refused to fly with them aboard. Nashville’s WSMV talked to Masudur Rahman-- one of the men forced off the plane. “The pilot said, ‘No, no, no, I am going. I’m not taking them.” “If they’d of asked you to do another check, would you have done it?” “Oh yeah sure, it is their job they are doing. It is our job to show we have nothing. We are Americans, we are living in America, and we want the security of American.” Pilots may refuse service at any time, but normally must show cause. Charolotte’s WCNC received a statement form the company that employs the pilot and crew. “We got a statement from Atlantic Southeast Airlines that tells us that they are investigating and quote, ‘Compensation and re-accommodation on the next available flight were immediately offered to the passenger and the passenger’s travel companion. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused.” Some believe it’s ultimately about safety and security. Blogcritics****’s John Lake says the airline needs to stand by the pilot. “The real issue is that most would agree the pilot did the right thing, in protecting his passengers and his plane....We are in fact surprised the passengers expressed no concern. The pilot....was at an impasse; any one of us might have done the same.” After the men finally arrived in Charlotte, they reached out to the Counsel for American Islamic Relations. CAIR’s Ibrahim Hooper told CNN the fear of all things Muslim is still very prevalent in the U.S. “They weren’t told that any passenger made any accusation against them. All that was mentioned was that some passengers were uncomfortable with them. And I’m assuming that would stem from their what you could regard as Islamic attire...People are just uncomfortable with being on a plane with someone who looks like they’re Muslim.” A similar incident happened a few years ago- involving Muslim clerics, or imams, traveling to the exact same annual conference. Gawker’s Max Read uses sarcasm to show how absurd the whole thing is. “You'd think the North American Imam Federation would have learned its lesson in 2006, when six imams traveling to one of its conferences were kicked off a plane in Minneapolis. But no! The organization continues to hold gatherings all over the country, "freely assembling" while trying to "address prejudice." And worse, its members want to fly on planes!” The booted travelers’ attorney tells CNN they are considering filing a lawsuit. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your newsfeed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
10 May 2011
488
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7:18
Anne Bradstreet - A Love Letter To Her Husband - Another & Another (II) - Read by Kate Reading A Love Letter To Her Husband by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) Phoebus make haste, the day's too long, begone, The silent night's the fittest time for moan; But stay this once, unto my suit give ear, And tell my griefs in either Hemisphere: (And if the whirling of thy wheels do n't drown'd The woful accents of my doleful sound), If in thy swift career thou canst make stay, I crave this boon, this errand by the way: Commend me to the man more lov'd than life, Show him the sorrows of his widow'd wife, My dumpish thoughts, my groans, my brackish tears, My sobs, my longing hopes, my doubting fears, And, if he love, how can he there abide? My interest's more than all the world beside. He that can tell the stars or Ocean sand, Or all the grass that in the meads do stand, The leaves in th' woods, the hail or drops of rain, Or in a cornfield number every grain, Or every mote that in the sunshine hops, May court my sighs and number all my drops. Tell him, the countless steps that thou dost trace, That once a day thy spouse thou mayst embrace; And when thou canst not treat by loving mouth, Thy rays afar, salute her from the south. But for one month I see no day (poor soul) Like those far situate under the pole, Which day by day long wait for thy arise, O how they joy when thou dost light the skies. O Phoebus, hadst thou but thus long from thine Restrain'd the beams of thy beloved shine, At thy return, if so thou couldst or durst, Behold a Chaos blacker than the first. Tell him here's worse than a confused matter, His little world's a fathom under water, Naught but the fervor of his ardent beams Hath power to dry the torrent of these streams. Tell him I would say more, but cannot well, Opressèd minds abrupted tales do tell. Now post with double speed, mark what I say, By all our loves conjure him not to stay. Another by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) Phoebus make haste, the day's too long, be gone, The silent night's the fittest time for moan; But stay this once, unto my suit give ear, And tell my griefs in either hemisphere. (And if the whirling of thy wheels don't drown'd) The woeful accents of my doleful sound, If in thy swift carrier thou canst make stay, I crave this boon, this errand by the way, Commend me to the man more loved than life, Show him the sorrows of his widowed wife; My dumpish thoughts, my groans, my brakish tears My sobs, my longing hopes, my doubting fears, And if he love, how can he there abide? My interest's more than all the world beside. He that can tell the stars or ocean sand, Or all the grass that in the meads do stand, The leaves in th' woods, the hail, or drops of rain, Or in a corn-field number every grain, Or every mote that in the sunshine hops, May count my sighs, and number all my drops. Tell him the countless steps that thou dost trace, That once a day thy spouse thou may'st embrace; And when thou canst not treat by loving mouth, Thy rays afar salute her from the south. But for one month I see no day (poor soul) Like those far situate under the pole, Which day by day long wait for thy arise, O how they joy when thou dost light the skies. O Phoebus, hadst thou but thus long from thine Restrained the beams of thy beloved shine, At thy return, if so thou could'st or durst, Behold a Chaos blacker than the first. Tell him here's worse than a confused matter, His little world's a fathom under water. Nought but the fervor of his ardent beams Hath power to dry the torrent of these streams. Tell him I would say more, but cannot well, Opressèd minds abruptest tales do tell. Now post with double speed, mark what I say, By all our loves conjure him not to stay. Another (II) by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) As loving hind that (hartless) wants her deer, Scuds through the woods and fern with hark'ning ear, Perplext, in every bush and nook doth pry, Her dearest deer, might answer ear or eye; So doth my anxious soul, which now doth miss A dearer dear (far dearer heart) than this. Still wait with doubts, and hopes, and failing eye, His voice to hear or person to descry. Or as the pensive dove doth all alone (On withered bough) most uncouthly bemoan The absence of her love and loving mate, Whose loss hath made her so unfortunate, Ev'n thus do I, with many a deep sad groan, Bewail my turtle true, who now is gone, His presence and his safe return still woos, With thousand doleful sighs and mournful coos. Or as the loving mullet, that true fish, Her fellow lost, nor joy nor life do wish, But launches on that shore, there for to die, Where she her captive husband doth espy. Mine being gone, I lead a joyless life, I have a loving peer, yet seem no wife; But worst of all, to him can't steer my course, I here, he there, alas, both kept by force. Return my dear, my joy, my only love, Unto thy hind, thy mullet, and thy dove, Who neither joys in pasture, house, nor streams, The substance gone, O me, these are but dreams. Together at one tree, oh let us browse, And like two turtles roost within one house, And like the mullets in one river glide, Let's still remain but one, till death divide. Thy loving love and dearest dear, At home, abroad, and everywhere.
16 Sep 2011
1358
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7:40
*******www.truelightoflife**** vxyx2z *******www.insight.spruz com __ The Wizard of Oz --- Selena: "Over the Rainbow" by Judy Garland --- Storyline: Chased off by the antics of Hank the Mule, Dorothy ends up in her cornfield, where she realizes her family's Scarecrow is alive. She helps him down and he takes a tumble on the turnstyle. A cyclone soon arrives and leaves Dorothy, Scarecrow, Toto and Hank spinning around on a haystack, with Imogene the Cow flying soon after. Soon after their arrival, the Wizard of Oz issues a public decree that he is a humbug, to make sure no one ever finds out. Glinda pops up out of the background and transforms Toto into a man in a bulldog suit to serve as a better protector for Dorothy. Then they encounter the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion, and Eureka.
12 Dec 2011
623
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15:07
Four teenage kids are driving back to school from summer break. Just hours away they stop for a rest stop on the side of the road and are soon attacked by a monster in the cornfield. Will they escape and survive or will this be their "Last Stop?"
27 Dec 2011
379
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1:29
Bourne Motors are an independent SAAB specialist, situated in Cornfield Lane, in the centre of Eastbourne. Established in 1975, we have many years of experience in servicing and diagnostic testing of SAABs and all other makes of cars. Since 1992 Bourne Motors has specialised in the sales, servicing and repair of SAAB vehicles. However, we can, and do, offer servicing for all makes of vehicle, to the manufacturer's recommendation. The work being undertaken by our trained team of vehicle technicians. Bourne Motors has worked hard to gain a local reputation for offering honest, friendly and knowledgeable advice to our clients. Now this reputation has started to spread further afield, with clients traveling from Kent, West Sussex and London, after hearing about Bourne Motors through the recommendation of friends or associates. Most of our clients are repeat customers, and some have been servicing their vehicles with us for over 20 years.
11 Apr 2012
211
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3:55
Block Zombies Review. Classic Game Room presents a CGRundertow video game review of Block Zombies, a very pixelated (erm, voxelated) survival horror(?) game developed and published in 2012 by Nostatic Software for the XBox Live Arcade indie channel. Radar O'Reilly never had it this bad. Sure, Hawk and Beej were a handful, but at least they had, y'know, curves. This Iowa cornfield is nothing but cubes, man, if'n you dig. Oh, I nearly forgot to mention: ZOMBIES. Run and gun, and blow zombies apart into their component voxels in this surprisingly deep little indie gem. This CGRundertow video game review features video gameplay footage of Block Zombies for the XBox 360 and audio commentary from Classic Game Room's TJ.
21 Oct 2012
705
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