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41:09
A range of treatments can relieve enlarged prostate symptoms -- medications, minimally-invasive office procedures, and surgery. The best one for you depends on your symptoms, how severe they are, and whether you have other medical conditions. The size of your prostate gland, your age, and your overall health will also factor into treatment decisions. What's best for a man in his 50s might not be optimal for an 80-year-old. An older man may want immediate symptom relief through drugs or surgery, whereas a younger man may lean toward a minimally invasive treatment. According to the American Urological Association, surgery often does the best job of relieving symptoms, but it also has more risks than other treatments. Consider the options carefully with your doctor, says Westney. "We can start with medications, and if there's no improvement, we look at minimally invasive therapy to reduce a portion of the prostate," she tells WebMD. "These procedures are very effective, and side effects are very rare." If symptoms are really bothersome -- or if you have complications like urine retention -- it may be best to bypass medication. The minimally invasive treatments have benefits over surgery, like quick recovery time; however, you may need a second procedure later on. There is also less risk of serious side effects like long-term incontinence or erection problems -- which can occur rarely with surgery.
17 Jun 2017
226
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41:09
A range of treatments can relieve enlarged prostate symptoms -- medications, minimally-invasive office procedures, and surgery. The best one for you depends on your symptoms, how severe they are, and whether you have other medical conditions. The size of your prostate gland, your age, and your overall health will also factor into treatment decisions. What's best for a man in his 50s might not be optimal for an 80-year-old. An older man may want immediate symptom relief through drugs or surgery, whereas a younger man may lean toward a minimally invasive treatment. According to the American Urological Association, surgery often does the best job of relieving symptoms, but it also has more risks than other treatments. Consider the options carefully with your doctor, says Westney. "We can start with medications, and if there's no improvement, we look at minimally invasive therapy to reduce a portion of the prostate," she tells WebMD. "These procedures are very effective, and side effects are very rare." If symptoms are really bothersome -- or if you have complications like urine retention -- it may be best to bypass medication. The minimally invasive treatments have benefits over surgery, like quick recovery time; however, you may need a second procedure later on. There is also less risk of serious side effects like long-term incontinence or erection problems -- which can occur rarely with surgery.
23 Sep 2017
180
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3:29
How to Treat Prostate Cancer with Androgen Deprivation Therapy|hormone treatment for prostate cancer works by which action Androgen Deprivation Therapy—also known as hormone therapy—is a way of lowering certain hormones (“androgens”) in the male body to treat prostate cancer. (Surgical therapy is also an option.) Studies have shown that prostate cancer may shrink or grow at a slower pace when androgen levels are reduced. Thus, many doctors and prostate cancer patients look to androgen deprivation therapy as an important prostate cancer treatment. By learning about it and consulting your physician, you may find that undergoing androgen deprivation therapy is the right treatment for you. 1 Talk to your doctor. After your initial diagnosis of prostate cancer in previously untreated prostate cancer patients, you’ll likely schedule a series of appointments with an oncological specialist. Your doctor will evaluate your condition and circumstances and make a recommendation about potential treatments. A physician will gather detailed medical history and perform a physical exam, if they have not done so already. Your doctor will explain to you your diagnosis, prognosis, and potential treatments. Based on diagnostics, they will likely talk about your “grade” or level of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is graded on a scale from 1 through 10, with 5 or above indicating tissue that is extremely abnormal and indicative of cancer. This is called a Gleason Score the higher the Gleason Score the more aggressive the cancer
27 Sep 2017
274
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