Results for: degenerative-joint-disease Search Results
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2:36
Canine osteoarthritis (also known as arthritis, degenerative joint disease or DJD) is the most common cause of chronic pain in dogs and is estimated to affect approximately 20 percent of dogs over one year old. This debilitating disease can affect any dog, but both age and breed are risk factors. We recognize the wonderful companionship and love our dogs give us by providing important tips for identifying this disease and managing the pain it can cause our dogs. We sat down with animal health experts, Dr. Kristin Kirkby Shaw and Meredith Kahn, M.S., Animal Science, to discuss how to spot the early signs, as well as treatment options and lifestyle recommendations to support and maintain a dog’s mobility.
29 Aug 2019
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3:30
Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) has released its first feature film, Majestic, starring world-renowned equine veterinarians Dr. Larry Bramlage of Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital and Dr. C. Wayne McIlwraith of Colorado State University. Majestic highlights revolutionary surgical procedures, gene therapies and animal research developments that are extending the life expectancy of horses with osteoarthritis. These same procedures are then transferred to humans with the degenerative joint disease. Majestic was filmed and produced by FBR and is available for purchase at an introductory rate of $10 (plus S&H) for personal viewing, classroom use and small group exhibition. For further information about individual purchase or sponsorship of the film for educational distribution, please contact us at infofbresearch**** or visit us at www.horsefacts****
7 Jun 2008
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0:22
I FEEL LIKE I HAVE HOPE NOW!!! Before Starting Chiropractic Care......... I went to several doctors for relief from the pain I had from degenerative joint disease and the pain medicine wasn't helping that much and I also started having stomach problems from the pain medicine. After Beginning NWA Chiropractic Care......... I have been going for the last few months and it has started making a difference in my pain and now I feel like I have hope of getting better and not being in pain all the time. Bill W. All reviews are Dr Philip Bland approved. NOTICE: The review of NWA Chiropractic is real. This positive testimonial review of NWA Chiropractic, PA in Rogers AR may be modified to qualify as unique content within the review space provided herein. Call NWA Chiropractic, PA at 479-633-8917 for more FIVE STAR**** Reviews and Ratings.
20 Jan 2011
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0:19
Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) is not just a disorder, but a group of conditions, often painful, that affect the jaw joint or Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) and the muscles that control chewing. Usually, discomfort from TMJ/TMD is occasional and temporary, often occurring in cycles. In most cases the discomfort will eventually go away whether treated or not. The temporomandibular joint connects the lower jaw, called the mandible, to the temporal bone at the side of the head. If you place your fingers just in front of your ears and open your mouth, you can feel the joint on each side of the head. Because these joints are flexible, the jaw can move smoothly up and down and side to side, enabling us to talk, chew and yawn. TMD falls into three main categories: 1. Myofascial pain, the most common form of TMD, which is discomfort or pain in the muscles that control jaw functions and the neck and shoulder muscles. 2. Internal derangement of the joint meaning a dislocated or displaced disc or injury to the condyle. 3. Degenerative joint disease such as Osteoarthritis or Rheumatoid Arthritis in the jaw joint. *******dentistry4life****/services.php?prod_name=TMJ%20/%20TMD
12 Mar 2011
385
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0:51
Bursitis and Osteoarthritis Treatment - Podiatrist in Annapolis, MD Patient discusses treatment received by Dr. James McKee for bursitis and osteoarthritis. *******www.podiatrygroup.us Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is frequently called degenerative joint disease or wear and tear arthritis. Aging usually brings on a breakdown in cartilage, and pain gets progressively more severe. Dull, throbbing nighttime pain is characteristic, and may be accompanied by muscle weakness or deterioration. Many of these symptoms can be relieved with rest. Overweight people are particularly susceptible to osteoarthritis. The additional weight contributes to the deterioration of cartilage and the development of bone spurs. Visit our website: *******www.podiatrygroup.us
13 Jul 2011
201
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0:53
Ankle Sprain - Podiatrist Torrance, Redondo Beach, Palos Verdes, California Dr. Robert Anavian discusses the symptoms, causes and treatments for Sprain Ankle. *******www.anavianfootcare**** Ankle Sprains in the Runner Ankle sprains are one of the most common joint injuries runners experience. The injury can occur when one rolls over a rock, lands off a curb, or steps in a small hole or crack in the road. Usually the sprain is only mild, but on occasion it may seriously injure the ligaments or tendons surrounding the ankle joint. Management of this injury relies on early and accurate diagnosis, as well as an aggressive rehabilitation program directed toward reducing acute symptoms, maintaining ankle stability, and returning the runner to pre-injury functional level. General Anatomy of the Ankle The ankle is comprised of three main bones: the talus (from the foot), the fibula and tibia (from the lower leg). The three bones together form a mortise (on the top of the talus), as well as two joint areas (on the inside and outside of the ankle), sometimes called the gutters. The ankle is surrounded by a capsule, as well as tissue (the synovium) that feed it blood and oxygen. Some of the more important structures that hold the ankle together are the ankle ligaments. Most ankle sprains involving the ligaments are weight bearing injuries. When a runner's foot rolls outward (supinates) and the front of the foot points downwards as he or she lands on the ground, lateral ankle sprain can be a result. It is usually this situation that causes injury to the anterior talo-fibular ligament. However, when the foot rolls inwards (pronates) and the forefoot turns outward (abducts), the ankle is subject to an injury involving the deltoid ligament that supports the inside of the ankle. This can occur when another runner steps on the back of the ankle, as at the beginning of a race, or when a runner trips and falls on the runner in front of him. Diagnosis When assessing an ankle sprain, your podiatrist will want to know the mechanism of injury and history of previous ankle sprains. Where the foot was located at the time of injury, popping sensations, whether the runner can put weight on the ankle are all important questions needing an answer. If past ankle sprains are part of the history, for example, a new acute ankle sprain can have a significant impact. The physical examination should confirm the suspected diagnosis, based on the history of the injury. One looks for any obvious deformities of the ankle or foot, black and blue discoloration, swelling, or disruption of the skin. When crackling, extreme swelling and tenderness are present, together with a limited range of motion, one may suspect a fracture of the ankle. A feeling of disruption on either the inside or the outside of the ankle may indicate a rupture of one of the ankle ligaments. To check for ankle instability, the runner should be evaluated while weight bearing. Manual muscle testing is also valuable when checking for ankle instability. One of the more critical tests that a runner should be able to perform before allowing resumption of activity is a single toe raise test. If the runner is unable to do this, one might suspect ligamentous injury or ankle instability. X-rays help rule out fractures, fleck fractures inside the ankle joint, loose bodies, and/or degenerative joint disease (arthritis). Stress X-rays are taken when ligamentous rupture or ankle instability is suspected. When a stress test is taken of your ankle, don't be surprised if the same test is performed on the other ankle. This is done to compare the two ankles, particularly in cases of ligamentous laxity (loose ligaments). In the past, more commonly, ankle arthrography has been used. This involves injecting a dye into the ankle joint as it is X-rayed. This helps determine if a rupture of a ligament or tear of the ankle capsule has occurred. However, this procedure does involve some discomfort during the injection process, and, on rare occasions, an allergy to the dye occurs. Other diagnostic tests include computerized tomography (CT Scan) to discover injuries of the bone, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to isolate and diagnose specific soft tissue injuries (ligaments, tendons, and capsule). The MRI is very specific, and gives a clear-cut view of these important structures. Treatment Treatment of an acute ankle injury usually begins with an aggressive physical therapy program that controls early pain and inflammation, protects the ankle joint while in motion, re-strengthens the muscles, and re-educates the sensory receptors to achieve complete functional return to running activity. Modalities that decrease pain and control swelling include icing, electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasound, and/or iontophoresis patches. Easy, mild motion, with the limits of pain and swelling, can actually reduce the effects of inflammation. A continued passive motion (CPM) machine can be very helpful in decreasing pain and swelling. Resumption of running activity is usually dependent on the runner's limits of pain and motion, and is begun to tolerance. As the runner improves, diagonal running can be prescribed. It is important to protect the runner with braces such as air casts, ankle braces, etc., which help to allow motion at the ankle joint under weight bearing. Home exercise programs are very helpful for the post-ankle sprain runner. Proprioception re-education is critical for both the acute as well as the chronic ankle sprain. It may involve using a simple tilt board or more sophisticated proprioceptive training and testing devices. For the acute grade III lateral ankle sprain, or complete deltoid tear, complete immobilization is usually recommended for at least four weeks. Afterwards, a removable cast is used to restrict motion and allow for physical therapy. If the ankle does not respond and ankle instability is diagnosed, surgical intervention may be required. Today, ankle arthroscopy a much less invasive procedure than other surgery, allows the ligament to be stabilized with tissue anchors. This eliminates an extended period of immobilization, joint stiffness and muscle atrophy. Post-operatively, this primary ligament repair is protected for approximately a two-to three-week period of time in either a cast or removable cast boot, with daily-continued passive motion, cold therapy, and controlled exercise. At three weeks, a simple air cast or ankle brace is applied for an additional three weeks while therapy and rehabilitation is progressing. At six weeks, these devices are used only during running and other athletic activity as a safeguard. As the runner resumes strength and proprioceptive capabilities, the devices are discontinued. Conclusion When an acute or chronic ankle sprain is not treated, as unfortunately is all too often the case, repeated ankle sprains may occur. Because chronic ankle injuries do not show acute inflammation even when the ankle is weak and unstable, this may set the runner up for another ankle sprain when least suspected. A successive sprain may be more severe than the first, and cause an even more significant injury. The most important point to keep in mind when talking about ankle injuries, then, is to prevent the condition from becoming chronic or recurrent. So the next time you roll over that stone, or land in that small hole, make sure that your simple ankle sprain is just that: simple. If you don't want to have a swollen ankle all the time while running, don't ignore early warning signs. If you have any doubts about its seriousness, have your podiatrist check your injury. Visit our website: *******www.anavianfootcare****
21 Nov 2011
434
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4:18
Osteoarthritis is one of the most common form of Arthritis. It is a chronic, degenerative joint disease, which can cause stiffness, pain and swelling, generally experienced in the morning. Boswellia is considered as an effective natural remedy for Osteoarthritis treatment because of the herb’s proven anti-inflammatory capabilities. The herb can also reduce joint pain and increase the mobility of joints
30 Oct 2018
163
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