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0:56
News from Japan! Quick video report of a Toyota Lexus Press Conference at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Tokyo, Japan, on 26th April 2006. Contains original footage from both DigInfo and Toyota Motor Corp (with permission from both).
18 Oct 2006
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3:16
- DigInfo News This is an uncut video demonstration of the Sony Rolly. The latest Sony music player, the Rolly, will be released in Japan on the 29th of September. A more in depth video with an interview and detailed explanation can be seen here:
10 Jun 2009
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2:25
DigInfo TV - *******jp.diginfo.tv 2011/4/6 オリエント工業 リアル ラブドール
28 Oct 2011
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1:19
Through a combination of network organisation (optimized for high capacity and flexibility) and new mobile features (and designs), KDDI intends to be a forerunner in the upcoming third (and fourth) generational mobile technology. Wireless Japan was held annually at Tokyo's Big Site (this year it was held between the 19th and the 21st of July) and exhibits the latest technologies and services among mobile phone, terminal devices, applications, content, wireless LAN, UWB, WiMAX, ZigBee, TD-CDMA e.g
20 Sep 2006
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0:57
Tech news from Japan. Toyota released their fourth generation Lexus (LS), focusing on emotively engaging the driver, at the New National Theatre Tokyo on the 19th of September 2006. We spoke to Toyota Motor Corporation President, Katsuaki Watanabe and Chief Engineer Moritaka Yoshida.
18 Oct 2006
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1:07
JJF 2006, Japan's acclaimed jewellery exhibition, showcased stunning pieces by over 450 exhibitors from over 18 countries. It is the mecca for consumers and merchants who deal in beautiful and intricate jewellery. JJF's (and this movie's) centerpiece is the Japanese Brand Collection and our event guide is the Managing Director of JJF, Christopher Eve.
18 Oct 2006
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0:42
Anritsu's Pureflow system: consisting of a traffic analyzer, and an interactive monitoring interface. The interface shows color coded traffic over a variety of internal and external networks. This makes it easy to visualize and manipulate the data flow. This level of control guarantees a quality connection for Voice Over IP, video conferencing and a range of other high bandwidth activities. Two models of the analyzer are available, one for conventional enterprise networks and a CATV solution. The software and hardware was completely developed in-house by Anritsu Corp.
1 Mar 2007
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0:54
Kuramoto Co., LTD's probe sheet is a first of its kind. Use to examine the light readings from the LCD display of mobile devices this design allows for more data to be transmitted. Instead of the usual polymide resin used to make the probes, the connections, this systems uses glass which cuts down the space between probes from 30 microns to 8 microns and thus facilitates data transmission. This can be used in any mobile display such as cell phones or gps devices.
1 Mar 2007
624
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1:21
Interop means networking and Extreme Networks, an international networking solutions provider, had a number of interesting secure open source solutions. Interop is held at Makuhari Messe in Tokyo Japan and regularly has over 150,000 visitors from around the world.
20 Sep 2006
691
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1:42
This movie briefly talks about Fujitsu's relationships with Cisco, NTT DoCoMo, and AU. Interop is a networking solutions exhibition that is held in many locations around the world every year. Business and personal computer users flock to it to see the latest and greatest technology available and to make deals. It is held at Makuhari Messe and regularly has over 150,000 visitors from around the world.
20 Sep 2006
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1:37
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15 Nov 2007
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1:20
DigInfo News Japan High-Resolution Image Enlargement Technology Sony Computer Entertainment CEDEC 2009 SCE PSP PS3 PlayStation
9 Sep 2009
242
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2:01
BY CATIE LAU ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN Facial expressions are a universal way to show how a person is feeling, but thanks to researchers at Miyazaki University, these same expressions can now show where a person wants to go--and take them there. Hiroki Tamura and his research team have developed a wheelchair that responds to cues from the expressive facial muscles. DigInfo TV explains how this remarkable new technology is used. Anchor: “The wheelchair can be turned right and left by blinking the right and left eyes, and stopped by clenching the teeth. To start the wheelchair moving forward, the user clenches their teeth once, and while it is moving they can clench their teeth again to stop.” Tamura describes the purpose behind the idea in TIME Magazine’s ‘Techland’: "The system is intended for people who are paralyzed from the neck down and people who are gradually losing the use of their muscles due to muscular dystrophy or ALS. … So we wanted to create a system for controlling an electric wheelchair using the expressive [facial] muscles, which remain functional at a relatively late stage of dystrophy." But how easily will individuals in these late stages of dystrophy be able to use the wheelchair? In November 2010, Tamura and his team published some of their initial findings in “Intelligent Robotics and Applications.” In an experiment designed to test ease of use, Tamura’s team put three subjects through an obstacle course using the wheelchair prototypes--one of them with experience using the technology, and two without. Results showed that the experienced subject performed only marginally better than those who had never used it before, and improved quickly. “From their experiments, we showed that the control of our proposed system is easy and our proposed system does not need a lot of training for the user.” Tamura says that he hopes to find a business to commercialize the product by next year, and according to Popular Science, there will be a few changes before it hits the market. “In the future, the researchers plan to ditch the somewhat unsightly electrodes in favor of a system embedded in goggles, which will be wirelessly synced with the chair. Hopefully that's possible--the electrodes actually look pretty effective, and this chair could be a life-changing invention for those currently without independent movement.”
22 Oct 2011
470
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2:40
BY STEVEN SPARKMAN Here’s your latest update in “Robot takeover of Earth” news. Two robots are getting blog chatter this week for inching closer to mimicking living organisms -- one step at a time. First, the Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan developed this ramblin’ man, BlueBiped. It’s a walking robot which mimics the human gait, and has no motors or electricity. It takes a small downhill grade to keep it going, and in tests it’s walked for 13 hours -- more than nine miles -- with no external power source. Video: DigInfo It works entirely through the potential energy of a downhill slope, making use of its momentum with carefully articulated joints. A writer for Popular Science praises the BlueBiped for its simplicity. “This type of forward falling motion is not exactly a new concept -- when I was your age, I had a Slinky, too -- but it’s an interesting reminder that robotic technology doesn’t necessarily need tons of servos and articulated limbs to accomplish a complex task.” The researchers tout their robots’ environmental friendliness, since it uses no fuel to move around. A writer for Wired UK explains some of their big plans for the bot. “There are two big ideas on the horizon: one is to transform the BlueBiped into some kind of exoskeleton to help people who have trouble walking. Another idea is to make the robot help out with sports equipment. Could be handy on the golf range, as long as it's all downhill.” Another robot getting attention this week -- how about a robot that eats living organisms? Two new prototypes destined for sci-fi horror are designed to mimic the venus fly trap and its lure-and-trap method of fly catching. Scientists in Maine created their carnivorous bot out of materials that mimic muscle fibers. Discovery News explains. “Touching the trigger hairs activates a solid-state relay and a small dynamic voltage generator causes the lobes to close quickly. The robot actually works. To test it, [the researcher] flicked the trigger hairs several times with a long stick and … the small Venus flytrap robot ensnared it. … he said the robot also successfully closed around a hapless fly.” A team in Korea were able to build the same sort of robot using shape memory materials. But neither of these fly traps actually digests the bug. But what do you know -- that technology also already exists. New Scientist spoke to a researcher at Bristol Robotics Lab, whose fly-digesting machine seems destined to join the fly traps. “Ecobot uses bacteria to break down a fly's exoskeleton in a reaction that liberates electrons into a circuit, generating electricity. But without a way to catch prey, the researchers either manually feed Ecobot with dead flies or use an ultraviolet bug lure -- like those used in restaurants. … ‘We'd be happy to talk to these groups about their flytraps.’” It’s a match made in heaven. Stick with Newsy for tech news. Be sure to download the newest version of our app from the app store.
1 Nov 2011
368
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