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BY LIZ REED You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy All Texas-native Dallas Weins wanted was a new face to kiss his daughter after a power line accident burned his features off in 2008. Fifteen hours and a team of 30 surgeons later, Wiens is the second man in the world to receive a full-face transplant. WIENS: "I’m 25 years old and 15 years ago, face transplants were science fiction. What's going to happen in the next 15 years?" Despite the operation’s success, the media and medical world wonder if face transplant techniques are safe and cost effective enough to become mainstream. An American Journal of Transplantation article published last year says: "It must be emphasized that face transplantation is still experimental and its therapeutic value remains to be validated. All surgical teams pursuing this endeavor must dedicate an attention to detail and should accept a responsibility to publish their outcomes in a transparent manner..." But WCVB reports the talent of the surgeons and the financial support of the U.S. government can make more face transplants like Wiens’ a reality. “They replaced the nose, lips, facial skin, muscles, which restore the facial animation, and also trying to bring back those nerves so he can once again feel sensation. I want to let you know that the Department of Defense actually covered the cost of this surgery, part of the grant to the hospital--They’re hoping the techniques will help soldiers coming back with traumatic injuries.” But the Department of Defense’s gift is only a piece of Wiens’ financial puzzle --A Forbes blogger also points out, he must pay for recovery medication and possible follow up surgeries. “A provision of the new health care law made the operation possible by allowing Weins, who had no insurance at the time of the accident, to qualify for the expensive procedure and medicine, under his father’s health care plan.” Since 2005, nine partial and two full-face transplants have been performed -- nine successfully. One recipient in China died after discontinuing his anti-rejection medicine and a man in France died after suffering a heart attack following infection. The Times of London also warns about the lack of post-surgery research on transplant recipients like Wiens. “[T]here is a substantial risk of surgery failing within five years, and that a lifetime on anti-rejection drugs will increase the recipient’s risks of getting cancer... While the surgical techniques are not new... [they] will require a far more intensive follow-up than has been administered for organ transplants.” Wiens’ surgeons say he is recovering well and can now talk on the phone to his family. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for more updates in your stream. Get more health video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
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BY MELISSA ROADMAN ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource business video news analysis from Newsy Google had a big idea. Publish 12 million old books...online. Problem is, not all the authors gave the OK... they’re dead. Now a federal judge says -- until Google can work out better details on compensation and ensure they aren’t violating anti-trust laws -- this book release is on hold. Here’s KPIX. “Yesterday a federal judge rejected a $125 million legal settlement that Google worked out with groups representing authors and publishers. He ruled that the deal was anti-competitive but the judge did not completely kill this project, which would make millions of out of print books available on the Internet.” A Los Angeles Times reporter says, the deal Google proposed during the settlement would have given compensation to the authors, but problems arose because Google did not get everyone’s consent. “Google scans most of its books without asking permission from their authors, many of whom are deceased or otherwise unreachable. Under the rejected settlement, authors and publishers would have been able to claim 70 percent of the proceeds from the sale of their books, with Google keeping 30 percent.” New York Federal District Judge Denny Chin suggested creating an “opt-in” option for authors and publishers. A Politico reporter simplifies it by saying... “In other words, rather than the onus be on publishers to deny permission to Google, Google instead would be tasked with receiving permission from copyright holders before it could scan books and place them online.” A writer for The New Yorker says he foresaw this problem a long time ago. “In 2007, I wrote about the Google Books project and laid out the dilemma: bringing forgotten and out-of-print books back to public notice, but at possible risk to the financial rights of the authors of those works. It was a hard problem then. It still is.” A Forbes magazine writer agrees Google shouldn’t have published the works without permission, but he suggests an alternative for paying for the books when the author can’t be contacted. “Google definitely strained the rules of the game, to say the least, by just going ahead and digitizing so many books without permission. But Google did do it, and I am confident most people are secretly glad they did...Charge some optional admission, like we charge for museums, and use the proceeds to pay off claimants to the orphaned works.” In court, Google representatives said the opt-in plan would not be viable, but the company plans to continue to amend its plan until the courts approve it. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
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BY: KELSEY WAANANEN ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy. It’s an app -- that offers a cure for -- “unwanted homosexuality.” Now -- The Guardian notes -- after allowing it to clear its app store hurdles -- Apple is pulling the so-called “gay cure” app. “The company has strict rules on governing the content of apps and regularly blocks apps it believes may cause offence or contain risqué content. [The app] had been marked “4+” by the company, a grade that meant Apple judged it contained no objectionable content.” But at least one organization says “hold the phone”. Gay rights group Truth Wins Out started an online petition -- gathering nearly 150,000 signatures at Change**** -- calling for the app to get the axe. Turns out, the mass protest did the trick. CNet notes an Apple Spokesperson said “[the app] violates our developer guidelines by being offensive to large groups of people.” But the conversation has only just begun. Now the hot button issue is a question -- how can Apple ban apps that are racist or anti-Sematic -- but allow the “gay cure” app in its store? Gawker discusses the role Apple has taken on by being curator. “CEO Steve Jobs designated the store as a place with “freedom from porn“ and from risqué fashion spreads, illustrated gay literature, political caricature and other controversial content. Now every time Apple approves an app, it implies moral endorsement of the content of that app. Rejections likewise carry an implied moral condemnation.” PC Magazine says “bravo” to Apple for removing the app. It then turns the lens on consumers and asks -- why support Apple as grand app poohbah? “... this is a very slippery slope. Many people already complain about Apple’s often confusing, inconsistent, and seemingly cavalier attitude toward app approval, denial, and removal. Are we saying that this attitude is okay when we agree with the actions?” A Forbes blogger agrees and says - consumers are letting themselves be regulated. “If, as some have predicted, we are moving away from an unregulated Internet wild west and toward a more “orderly” electronic society of pre-packaged App-voices, we do ourselves a frightening disservice to ask Apple, or any other corporate entity, to serve as our national gatekeeper.” Apple has not issued an official statement about the removal and Change**** says it will keep on collecting signatures until it does. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
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BY: KRISTEN BRODY You're watching multisource tech video news analysis from Newsy. Here’s a new Facebook notification for ya -- Mark Zuckerberg is no longer single. The infamous Facey Founder has changed his relationship status from single to taken. The lucky girl? Zuck’s long time G-F Priscilla Chan. The two have been dating since their college days at Harvard. Daniel Bates of the Daily Mail reports that Chan revealed exactly when the relationship started on her Facebook page. (Video Source: Oprah) He observes this date to be awfully close to another significant time in Zuckerberg’s life. “November 7 2003, just days after Zuckerberg's infamous Facemash stunt at Harvard.” “He was nearly expelled from the university after hacking into different colleges' websites and taking pictures of all the female students, placing them next to each other and asking other students to 'rate' their attractiveness.” So why make it Facebook official some eight years later? A blogger for Forbes seems to think it’s because things are getting serious for the CEO and his gal. (Video Source: 60 Minutes) Reporting the relationship update came after a new puppy purchase between the two. “I’ve noticed that friends on Facebook who have been dating for years who suddenly make a change to reveal they are in a relationship often follow that up soon thereafter with an “engagement” announcement.” Whether or not wedding bells are in the future, Adrian Chen of Gawker says the Z-man has just opened up a big ‘ol can of worms. “Isn't changing your relationship status on Facebook just the worst? That excruciating torrent of comments and likes, from people you haven't talked to in years.” “You must now never break up, or face yet another public pillorying at the hands of your Facebook friends.” If Zuckerberg didn’t change his status to announce an engagement, a reporter for Time’s Newsfeed ponders what other decisions might have effected the change. Maybe-- “Zuckerberg is feeling the pressure to follow his motto of trying to make the world a more open place.” Or-- “When you're one of the richest people in the world and were recently named TIME's Person of the Year, you might start to consider other parts of your life that need to reach the next level. So mazel tov, Mark and Priscilla. You've got an adorable dog, and now you've got a Facebook-official relationship.” As of now, Zuckerberg seems to like his new status, adding it was quote -- “slightly overdue”... with a smiley face -- to his new relationship update. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Get more multisource tech video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
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BY MIRANDA WHEATLEY You're watching multisource US video news analysis from Newsy. Has the nuclear crisis in Japan -- found its way to rainwater in the U.S.? According to several news outlets, officials say rainwater in Massachusetts has tested positive for Radioiodine-131. “It is 6,500 miles from Fukishima, Japan to Massachusetts but that’s how far radioactive fallout from the plant has traveled.” CNN “Trace amounts of that radioactive material from Japan has turned up in rainwater in at least 13 United States, states.” Fox News “They think the radioiodine may be linked to Japan’s damaged nuclear plant and plan to monitor the state’s drinking water.” HLN Officials say the amount of Radioiodine is not enough to cause alarm. MIT’s Ian Hutchinson tells WFXT in Boston radiation is a naturally occurring element and harmless in small amounts. “Radiation is a completely natural part of our background. The human body has a substantial amount of natural radiation in it, the only reason we know that this particular radiation came from the nuclear reactor site is because it’s a particular type of radiation that comes from this particular type of iodine we can identify it through specific tests.” CNN echoes that response saying spikes in radiation were seen in the U.S. even before the earthquake in Japan. “Las Vegas, there’s spikes, this is the earthquake, there are spikes before the earthquake, after the earthquake. The sun makes more radiation than what you had there in Massachusetts. A plane ride from California to L.A., from California to New York would give you more radiation than that.” The public health commissioner tells WCVB drinking water in Boston is safe. “We want to make clear that here is no health impact. None of the cities and towns rely on rainwater on their primary source of water--that is why we are so comfortable when saying drinking water supplies throughout the states are completely safe.” The Boston Globe reports the Radioiodine won’t be around for long and the public health commissioner says at these levels even drinking the rainwater directly would have little impact. “...only half of the level of radiation will be present in eight days, and so on until it dissipates.” But as Forbes points out - even with reassurance the findings have some Americans worried. “...some Americans have not been content to take the government at its word. Geiger counters have been selling like popsicles in summer, and traffic has never been higher at websites that display data from radiation monitoring stations.” For more information on the EPA’s radiation monitoring site, RadNet, check out the link in our transcript section. Get more multisource US video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
1000
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BY JIM FLINK You're watching multisource tech video news analysis from Newsy. Goodbye keyboard. So long mouse. Google -- has a new interactive technology called “Motion.” It can interpret your every move -- and fill in the blanks. Here’s a look. “Using your computer camera and a spatial tracking algorithm, gmail motion interprets physical movement and turns it into actionable commands. For example, to open a message, make a motion as if you’re opening an envelope. To reply, simply point backward with your thumb. To reply all, use both hands. To send a message, simply lick a stamp and place it down.” Digital Trends says -- it was just a matter of time before this would happen. Call it -- game time meets office time. “Taking a cue from Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect, Gmail Motion allows users to compose emails with the use of gesture-based controls. The next part may take some a bit of time to get comfortable with, especially while in a crowded office setting. But, as Google says, it’s totally worth it.” Wow. Pure genius, right? Forbes says, this is a game changer -- and an office changer. “Your desk needs to change today. It needs to be higher, and perhaps even sense when you’ve moved too far out of range. The office chair industry is toast and America’s obesity problem is gone. One caveat, however. Apple has already refused to let this work on the iPad.” Tech Leash says -- this has endless possibilities! “And if you think this is it, wait till you see the same in action for Google Docs! Ever seen anyone make a pie chart like this?” GizmoCrunch says, there are a couple of downsides to Google Motion though. One -- learning all those new motions -- that’s gonna take some time. And then once you start, well, you’ve got to give your body a break. Google recommends taking 30 to 40 minute breaks in between as using Gmail Motion and stretching in between. Hit the source link to give it a go, we'll wait right here. If you’re ready to try it out. Google has a page for that. Oh -- and good luck with it -- it’s April Fools. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for more tech video news updates in your feed. Get more multisource tech video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
9 Apr 2011
331
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2:03
BY CHRISTY LEWIS ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource business video news analysis from Newsy. After the bidding for a bankrupt Blockbuster ended—Dish Network walked away the winner. The once-popular blue and gold rental store is now part of the satellite company—all for a hefty $320 million. (In a statement, Dish says...) "… Blockbuster will complement our existing video offerings while presenting cross-marketing and service extension opportunities for DISH Network … While Blockbuster's business faces significant challenges, we look forward to working with its employees to re-establish Blockbuster's brand as a leader in video entertainment." Long after reigning as leader in video entertainment--Blockbuster closed more than 900 of its stores and filed for bankruptcy due to a devastating drop in sales. With this in mind--critics are responding to Dish Network’s statement saying, ”How you going to do that?” Fox Business reports one of the company’s possible plans. “Dish Network may try to use the existing stores to sell their services.” So, one option is selling subscriptions to Dish in old Blockbuster buildings. But, Horizon Media’s Brad Adgate sees another option for Dish Network and Blockbuster’s marriage--spicing things up a bit. “Offering things that other people can’t get…kind of like the old Netflix model. If you’re a Dish subscriber, you can get free DVD’s by mail.” The competing bidders were Carl Icahn Blockbuster’s previous owner, and SK Telecom—who both reportedly would have liquidated the company—closing all stores— if they won. So, a Dallas Morning News writer says Dish’s victory was also Blockbuster’s. “In the end, Dish’s offer gives more money to the debtholders and preserves jobs, leases and stores.” Craig Moffett, a senior analyst at Bernstein Research is scratching his head at why anyone would want to buy Blockbuster. Forbes notes a few of his skeptical words about its survival saying there’s… “…‘meaningful risk, in that Blockbuster’s business is a rapidly melting ice cube.’ He says it is ‘entirely possible that it becomes a drain on cash flow going forward.’” Most analysts do agree that the selling point of Blockbuster will be its on-demand features—instead of the retail stores and rental kiosks. The transaction between Dish and Blockbuster is set to close in the second quarter. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for more business video news updates. Get more multisource business video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
9 Apr 2011
878
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BY KELSEY WAANANEN ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource tech video news analysis from Newsy. One UK billionaire has already had his fair share of innovative ideas and now he's got another. This time - he's thinking deep. Thirty six thousand feet deep to be exact. Virgin Group boss Richard Branson introduced Virgin Oceanic - a project that will launch a single-person submarine into the deepest places in the world’s five oceans. After launching projects like Virgin Galactic - which will send the wealthy into space - Fortune’s Poppy Harlow asks Branson - where did this idea come from? RB: “Well the original idea interestingly came from Steve Foster before he died. You know, he just wanted to break the record for being the first person to get, solo dive to the deepest part of the ocean.” And Forbes is unsurprised Branson has already planned to set records with this venture. “... Branson being Branson, it won’t be any great shock that he’s got some Guinness World Records in his sight — he’s betting he’ll set 30 of them.” Branson, who is now 60, has sought out and set records for hot air balloon travel, crossing the English Channel in a car-boat and crossing the Atlantic in a motorboat. That’s a lot of action for a businessman. But as for this product, TIME's Techland says - keep your opinions to yourself about Branson - the submarine is impressive. “Whatever your opinion of Branson and his business empire, you have to admire the astonishing engineering involved in creating a sub like this.” And The Washington Post says- the motivation for this project isn’t shallow. “The trip will not just be pursuing a rich man’s whim to sightsee in the deep. Branson has partnered with a number of research organizations to study the tectonic plates and bring back water, microbes and possibly small creatures.” But a director at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Institute told the LA Times that this trip isn’t that scientifically significant yet... and may never be. “The craft ... may find its greatest value in the way it helps satisfy the human need to push limits and explore.” But for now, BBC says-- Branson’s got money on his mind. “And as you'd expect for Richard Branson he's thinking of the future. One day he hopes to build bigger submarines, he told me, and take paying passengers to see the wonders of the bottom of the ocean.” And though the idea may seem futuristic, the future is now. The submarine has already been built and test runs are planned to take place this month - with the first dives taking place this year. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for video news updates in your feed. Get more multisource science video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
908
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1:56
BY TARA GRIMES ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource US video news analysis from Newsy It just might pay to be a baby mamma these days. At least, some critics say, if you’re Bristol Palin. MSNBC ANCHOR: “When appointed teen ambassador for raising awareness for teen pregnancy prevention, Bristol Palin said that if she could prevent one girl from getting pregnant she would feel a sense of accomplishment. However, tax documents show that wasn’t Palin’s only incentive. On that job in 2009 she earned more than a quarter of a million dollars.” The Associated Press reports, Palin was paid handsomely by the non-profit organization Candie's Foundation for public service announcements like these… BRISTOL PALIN: “What if I couldn’t finish my education?” …while the foundation itself donated just $35,000 to health and counseling clinics. The blogosphere blew up when it learned Palin made nearly 10 times what the clinics received. America Blog writes... “Palin should be fired immediately... This is the family values crowd sending this message to America's kids. Get pregnant as a get rich quick scheme. Lovely.” Others say if celebrities like MTV “Teen Mom” Amber Portwood can rake in the dough for bad behavior, why can’t Palin? The Business Insider writes, celebrities cash in on PSA’s all the time. “Before you cry foul over Palin's paycheck: other spokespersons for the foundation include Hilary Duff, Fergie and Ciara. It's doubtful that any of them are doing it for less than a quarter mil.” Still others criticize the Candie's Foundation, saying it spends too much money on events, galas, and celebrity endorsements, when it should be focused on the cause. Forbes points out it happens all the time. “We should encourage charities and charitable investments, but we should hold these programs accountable. If I had donated to the Candie’s Foundation, I would not have expected my money to go mostly to paying for Palin’s wardrobe.” The Candie’s Foundation says Palin has been a courageous and powerful partner to the foundation and is just being compensated for her work. Get more multisource US video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
9 Apr 2011
609
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BY ALANA YOUNG ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource political video news analysis from Newsy. It’s an election that had a surprising and dramatic twist -- and some say symbolizes recent uproar over Governor Scott Walker’s budget repair bill -- which limited collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin. She was largely considered a long shot - but Democrat-backed Joanne Kloppenburg bested the 12-year incumbent and former Republican legislator David Prosser in a tight race for the Supreme Court justice seat. Then - as early as Thursday afternoon - Winnebago County gave a 40-point lead to PROSSER. Those numbers are not yet official - but analysts say the very, very tight race shows how deeply divided Wisconsin voters are. RACHEL MADDOW: “A month and a half ago there was a primary in this same Wisconsin Supreme Court election, and a month and a half ago, the incumbent conservative judge who used to be a Republican legislator, who was supported by the conservative establishment in Wisconsin, who was associated with Republican Governor Scott Walker, and who Scott Walker said he would vote for, a month and a half ago, that justice finished 30 points ahead of his nearest challenger in that primary. … Last night, however, with 100% of precincts now reporting, it looks like that justice, that conservative judge has been unseated.” Because the race was so close, Kloppenburg quickly received criticism for announcing her victory Wednesday -- and calls for a recount soon surfaced. According to Business Insider - Wisconsin law allows for a free election recount if polling results differ by .5 percent or less. Incumbent candidate David Prosser would have three days to request one. Along with cries for a recount, a few conservative voices are raising issue with Wisconsin voting rules -- and say voter fraud is a legitimate concern with this election. JOHN FUND: “Wisconsin is one of only a handful of states that allows same-day registration. You go into the polls, you register and you can immediately vote. There is almost no I.D. requested. If you have no I.D., some guy down the street can vouch for you. ... Milwaukee cast almost 4,000 more votes for president than people who showed up at the polling place or cast absentee ballots. So there are all kinds of problems here that have been allowed to fester.” And while some conservatives are raising doubts over the vote’s results - others - like Forbes’ Rick Ungar - say it proves Governor Walker doesn’t command as much support as he thought. “While Wisconsin judicial elections are officially nonpartisan, Prosser is well known as a Republican who was quickly associated with Scott Walker... The inescapable bottom line is that the many political miscalculations of Scott Walker are now coming home to roost...” But a writer for the Wall Street Journal says it’s not over yet -- unions might fight hard -- but state Republicans should fight harder for reform. “Big Labor went all-in to seek revenge against Governor Scott Walker's public union reforms, and they may have taken over the state Supreme Court in the bargain... Unions were never going to easily give up their dominance over the public purse. The lesson of Wisconsin is to retool the reform message so taxpayers know the stakes.” And what does the Governor have to say about what’s being called this “turning political tide” in his state? Walker says he is all about making sure the election process is equal and fair. SCOTT WALKER: “Uh, I wouldn’t think something’s wrong as long as it’s fair. To me, democracy, which, guarantees that you give everybody a right. That everybody has a right to have a say.” Wisconsin election officials are preparing for recount efforts. If Kloppenburg secures a victory, she will assume duties August 1st. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in you stream Get more multisource political video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
12 Apr 2011
765
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2:15
BY: JACQUELINNE MEJIA ANCHOR SALEM SOLOMEN You're watching multisource business news analysis from Newsy Voters in Iceland don’t want to repay Britain and the Netherlands 3.9 billion euros. euronews sums up the situation. “The debt was incurred when Icesave, a subsidiary of Landsbanki, collapsed in late 2008, and Britain and the Netherlands compensated their nationals who lost 3.9 billion euros in savings. But opponents to the plan say there is no legal obligation on ordinary Icelanders to repay losses incurred by a private bank.” So are the three nations headed to court? A reporter from Iceland’s Channel 2 in Reykjavik talks to the BBC about the next step. “So what happens now is that Iceland will make its case in the after court, and hope for the ruling to decide that it does not have a legal obligation to repay the four billion euros.” But Britain won’t take ‘no’ as an answer. The Daily Mail reports British officials plan to sue Iceland in order to get the money back. “The Government is now expected to lodge a claim against Iceland with the European Free Trade Association Court in Luxembourg, although the case could take years to resolve.” Britain and the Netherlands may have a strong case. The Wall Street Journal explains the violations Iceland committed under its European Economic Area membership. “The authority says Iceland violated rules by not backing Icesave depositors—and by reimbursing domestic depositors but not foreigners [...] Iceland is a member of the European Economic Area, which means it has signed up to many of the European Union's financial and trade rules—among them a requirement that countries maintain deposit-insurance systems.” A person who supports the voice of the people? Iceland’s President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson. IceNews reports President Grímsson praises the 60 percent of Icelanders who voted no. “[...] Iceland’s President...praised the nation’s ability to rationally discuss complicated issues and vote to follow its conscience. [..] The President said he hopes yesterday’s referendum will affect the way Iceland’s democracy functions in the future, for the better.” Grímsson was the first president in the country’s history to use the right to call a referendum. That’s after he refused to sign a bill that would allow the country's taxpayers to repay Britain and the Netherlands. (Video: Forbes) The European Free Trade Association will be hearing the case. Iceland, which has pushed an application to join the European Union, may be blocked by both Britain and the Netherlands. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
12 Apr 2011
788
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2:18
BY MOLLY BOLAND ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM You're watching multisource entertainment video news analysis from Newsy. Two of America’s most well-known news anchors might just be heading toward a reunion on the daytime television scene. “The two used to co anchor the ‘Today’ show together. Couric announced last week she’s leaving her gig at the CBS Evening News and rumor has it that she’s in talks to get her own syndicated talk show. Now the LA Times is reporting that she wants Lauer to host it with her. You’ll remember there were reports last week that Lauer wants off the Today show when his contract is up in 2012." (KSWB-Fox) Despite media rumors, not everyone is convinced. A writer for Forbes is doubtful and The Huffington Post writes, NBC won’t let Lauer go that easily. “It probably won’t happen. NBC will do whatever it takes to keep Lauer, even if it means making “the biggest offer in television news history,” as the Times puts it.” “He is currently at the top of a very lucrative field (and a wildly profitable show) and NBC will not be nearly as eager to part ways with him as CBS seemingly has been with Couric's anchor job.” Lauer reportedly makes 17 million but could be aiming to increase that number. According to TMZ, the whole talk show idea is a -quote- “ploy” to get an extra 8 million a year. As for Katie -- the soon-to-be former CBS Evening News anchor told The New York Time’s Andrew Goldman, she IS exploring the possibility of daytime TV -- and The Atlantic Wire reports, it could be the right move. “With a new slot opening up in Oprah's wake, veterans think Couric would be a smashing success in a syndicated talk show role. ...Couric seems better suited to star in ‘The Katie Couric Show’ than the more collaborative environment at Evening News.” So, Lauer wants to leave and Katie is definitely planning something. Entertainment Tonight examines the daytime lineup that could get a new face or two. “Oprah’s departure leaves a big new hole in daytime TV. Rachel Ray, Dr. Phill, and Dr. Oz are still there and CNN’s Anderson Cooper is getting a syndicated talk show.” “Katie Couric would be of a real appeal for stations because she’s a name that America already knows.” Finally, Mediabistro quotes daytime host Maury Povich, who says Couric will do well -- once she opens up a bit. “You have to say to your audience, ‘Look, we’re imperfect human beings.’ That’s why they can relate to you. Once Katie gets the ‘news anchor’ tag off herself, where she’s inhibited in so many ways, she can just be Katie. That’s all she has to do.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for more entertainment video news analysis in your feed. Get more multisource entertainment video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
16 Apr 2011
611
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2:51
BY BRICE SANDER ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource business news analysis from Newsy. Three strikes and you’re out. That’s the message Major League Baseball’s sending to L.A. Dodgers owner Frank McCourt. After seven years as owner of the Dodgers, Major League Baseball chairman Bud Selig forced out McCourt as the team’s owner. (CNN) So what gives? Personal drama- a bitter divorce from McCourt’s wife, the team’s co-owner, led to McCourt’s demise. Los Angeles’ KABC explains. “According to court records, McCourt has debts exceeding $600 million. Last year, Forbes valued the team at $727 million. Compared to the stability of the O’Malley ownership for 48 years, it’s hard to believe the strong and proud franchise has ended up this way.” The team is technically in compliance with all of baseball’s financial rules, so rumor has it McCourt isn’t happy and plans to sue. But a writer for NBC Sports says, fat chance. “My understanding of the matter — and someone, please, tell me if I’m off base here — is that Selig can basically do anything with a team and its owner … as long as he has the support of 3/4 of the other owners … For him to have taken over the Dodgers means that he almost certainly has the backing of baseball’s other owners.” As for what’s next for the team? Many are saying -- Get McCourt out ASAP. ESPN Magazine’s Molly Knight runs through the Dodgers’ game plan on SportsCenter. MOLLY KNIGHT: “I don’t think we’re going to see Frank McCourt at Dodger Stadium for very much longer. Currently, he’s still in charge – I mean he’s still the owner of the team and figurehead. But, Bud Selig is sending an emissary out sometime this week. We don’t know who it is, yet, but we know that they’ll be in the stadium in the next couple of days, and that person’s going to take control of day-to-day operations. So there will be no signings, no trades, nothing like that without his approval.” Bloomberg’s Scott Soshnick defends the league’s decision, saying this isn’t the first time it’s had to step in. SCOTT SOSHNICK: “Yeah, maybe this should be the barbarians not at the gate, but at the turnstile, because they’re so highly leveraged. And we’re seeing that a lot in sports these days- baseball took over in the sale of the Texas Rangers when Thomas Hicks when leveraged in a team as well. So they do not want some sort of debt ratio that gets out of hand here.” This news breaks just weeks after McCourt brushed off a Giants fan’s beating at Dodger Stadium. A blogger for ESPN Los Angeles argues that was a final straw, for both fans and the org. “I've been a passionate skeptic of fan boycotts, but even I have to concede that there was a statement being made here. More and more people just didn't want any part of this … It's been people on their own coming to the conclusion that life was too short to waste on a franchise in this condition.” McCourt tried to salvage his stake in the team through a $30 million partnership with Fox, who broadcasts the games. But since it was a personal loan, no such luck. McCourt’s successor should be announced in the next few days. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
25 Apr 2011
860
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5:43
Triple Spiral Productions presents "J.O.Forbes of Corse / St. Anne's Reel" performed by Brian Theriault and Skip henderson at Historic Oakland Pub, Heinhold's First and Last Chance. Both Brian and Skip play weekly at Quinn's Lighthouse, about a mile away, and then (most of the time) end up here. These tunes are traditional Irish/Scottish tunes played on fiddle and accordian. Heindhold's First and Last Chance is known for being Jack London's "Local Pub." Surrounded by modern office buildings, it has survived with a character all it's own. You're not drunk, the floor actually IS slanted from the 1906 earthquake. Brought to you by Triple Spiral Productions. Triple Spiral Productions can be contacted at *******www.triplespiralproductions**** (c) 2011 Triple Spiral Productions, all rights reserved.
23 Apr 2011
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2:54
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource tech news analysis from Newsy. It’s a crowded market that relies on one bit of consumer wisdom: everyone loves a good deal. Now - Facebook’s getting in on the action. KCPQ: “The social networking site is adding a new feature that lets users share their shopping experiences with each other and save money. It's called 'Facebook Deals.' USA Today says the deals will appear on a users’ news feed through ads on a dashboard to the left. From there, you can buy the deal with a credit card, share it or 'like’ it.” The service actually launched in Europe about three months ago. By most accounts - Facebook Deals is going after one rival in particular: Groupon Commercial: “Save the money. Unlock great deals in your town. Groupon****.” Groupon killer? That’s the word in the blogosphere. ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick is already writing the obit. “At least in Europe, Facebook Deals offered deals for free. Free! The giant social network could scale like crazy doing that... It's a Walmart-style move, but Groupon isn't as lovable as the Mom 'n' Pop corner store.” Groupon reaches deal-seekers through a daily email -- Facebook Deals will show up in a users’ newsfeed. KTVU’s Jade Hernandez explains Facebook’s leg up on the competition. “Groupon counts on users to spread the word of a good deal through social media. But Facebook opens this up by using social networking platform. And by partnering with open table and gilt city, both of which specialize in different things, restaurant and high end deals with high end designers, the news is making some people excited about what a rivalry could mean for the consumer.” What it means for the consumer -- suggests All Facebook’s Jackie Cohen -- is market saturation. She asks- how long can the business of daily deals hold up? “So far, statistics have shown that businesses tend to do only one group buying offer to get customers and then never return to these services. That would suggest that this whole market has a very limited shelf life.” But the real headliner -- according to Forbes -- is users can spend Facebook Credits on the deals. Can you say game changer? “Until now people had only been able to use Credits to buy virtual goods for games, as well as for some digital products such as movies. Now people can purchase a voucher to buy a physical product for the first time ... which could move Facebook even further as an e-commerce platform.” That’s all TECHNICALLY true -- though Facebook PR reps contacted ReadWriteWeb to clarify -- users can’t buy “physical goods” with credits -- but rather vouchers redeemable at events. In the end though -- for all the “Groupon killer” talk -- Business Insider’s Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry calls himself a “Groupon bull.” “...actually, building a huge sales and service infrastructure is very hard ... similar to how anyone can start selling stuff online, but becoming Amazon is very hard. … [Facebook Deals’ key to success is] establishing that group buying is really a ‘feature’ that most media sites can replicate and not a ‘company.’” Facebook Deals won’t be offered on mobile apps. It’s making its U.S. debut in only five cities: Atlanta, Austin, Dallas, San Diego and San Francisco. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
30 Apr 2011
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1:28
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER You're watching multisource tech news analysis from Newsy. “We can track you!” That message is going to be the new sticker bling for all of Verizon’s smartphones. ABC-affiliate WXYZ explains. “Verizon wireless is planning to add warning stickers on its cell phones. The move comes after Apple admitted its iPhones record and store users' locations.” A writer for Forbes hints that the stickers are Verizon’s way of responding to Congressional pressure about cell phone privacy. “On the Hill right now, privacy is the pretty, young thing that many a politician wants to make a move on. It seems that not a day goes by without a congressman calling a hearing, dashing off an angry letter, or introducing a bill about protecting Americans’ privacy.” Apple denies there’s a privacy problem with its iPhone, but all the trouble began when news broke it was possible to map users’ locations. A writer for MobileCrunch says the news got Verizon’s attention because the company doesn’t want its pocketbook drained. (Info: SeattlePI/AP) “Whatever’s being done with the data, it’s likely to creep folks out. And when folks get creeped out, the lawsuits start pouring in.” Verizon’s phone stickers won’t tell you exactly how to turn off the tracking -- and Detroit’s WDIV anchor even goes as far as to make a reference to George Orwell’s “1984”. “To limit access to location information refer to the user guide. So if you want the turn off big brother, refer to the guide.” AT&T admitted it keeps users’ information for up to five years, and Verizon fessed up to a whopping seven. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your newsfeed. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
3 May 2011
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