Results for: fukushima-daiichi Search Results
Family Filter:
2:22
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR: CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. The death toll from the deadly tsunami and earthquakes in Japan has already topped 10,000, and there have been reports of high radiation levels surrounding the damaged Fukushima power plant as well. While it’s still unclear how it happened, three workers were exposed to water containing iodine, caesium and cobalt that was 10,000 times the normal level while replacing a cable inside the plant. The injuries and high levels of radiation point to potential damage to a fuel rod. (Video: MSNBC) (Information: The Telegraph, Japan Times) There have been no reports indicating water level radiation that high outside the plant. CTV takes a closer look at what happened to the workers. CHRIS JOHNSON: “...and apparently their images are what they’re calling beta ray burns, people in Japan have never even heard that word before.” ...but The Guardian translated a message from a Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency spokesman, who seemed to be pointing a finger at the nuclear workers themselves, saying it was their fault for not following proper dress code. HIDEHIKO NISHIYAMA, TRANSLATED, ANCHOR MAY READ: “If they had followed the proper rules set out by the previous survey, they would have had better attire. Specifically there was a problem when you think of how they got water in their shoes. Also, they continued to work even though their dosimeter alarms were going off, though there may have been a misunderstanding.” Japan Times reports puddles of contaminated water were also found in the turbine buildings of reactors 1 and 2, and says the worsening state of the nuclear reactors could drive the government to take more action. “There are now indications that the government will raise the crisis level for the event, now at 5, to level 6, putting it above the Three Mile Island incident. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster tops the international scale at level 7.” All of the nuclear destruction has caused some Japanese people to take to the streets, something that, as BBC reports, doesn’t happen often. “In central Tokyo, a tiny group of protesters is gathered outside the grand headquarters of Tokyo Electric Power. Passing commuters take little notice of them, even now few Japanese are willing to publicly challenge huge corporations, like TEPCO.” Al Jazeera focuses more on what’s being done to prevent further nuclear mishaps, and highlights a major change in a cooling technique. WAYNE HAY: “...but now they are concerned that the salt from the sea water may be encrusting on the fuel rods themselves, therefore rendering the cooling situation useless, so they are now pumping fresh water into those reactors.” Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos to keep up with all updates on Japan’s crisis. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
879
Share Video

2:37
BY ALLIE SPILLYARDS AND TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy After days of pumping water into the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to cool damaged reactors, Japanese emergency workers have another problem: what do they do with all that water? With more than 11,000 tons of radioactive water needing somewhere to go and more runoff on the way, Tokyo Electric has turned to the Pacific. LEE COWAN: “Engineers have now had to prioritize. So what they’re going to do is they’re going to pump several tanks worth of lesser radioactive water directly into the ocean that is to make room for the really radioactive water.” (NBC) On-site storage tanks have already filled up, and a writer for TIME explains -- the decision to release water into the ocean is part of an ongoing struggle restore the plant’s electric-powered cooling systems. “The problem is maddeningly circular: workers can’t safely fix the power connection while there is so much irradiated water around, but workers can’t stop dousing the plant with water while the electricity is down. Dealing with the water will require its own processes.” Meanwhile, highly radioactive water has been gushing into the ocean through a large crack in a pit at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Polymore, cement, sawdust and shredded newspaper have all been used to try and stop the leak. The Wall Street Journal’s Mariko Sanchanta talks about the frustration. “It does sound pretty haphazard. When we heard that they were throwing in shredded newspaper yesterday, three bags full. But we don’t have any idea the volumes they’re using, the quantities ... but as far as we know the crack has not been sealed yet.” Water leaking from the pit has been measured at as much as 1,000 millisieverts - meaning just 15 minutes of exposure would tap out workers’ yearly radiation allowance of 250 millisieverts. But as a writer for the BBC reports, THAT water will not be purposefully dumped. “Tepco says the low-radioactive water it intends to deliberately release into the sea has iodine-131 levels that are about 100 times the legal limit. But it stressed in a news conference on Monday that if people ate fish and seaweed caught near the plant every day for a year, their radiation exposure would still be just 0.6 millisieverts. Normal background radiation levels are on the order of 2 millisieverts per year.” And while there has been some concern over radiation reaching shores across the Pacific, ABC’s Neal Karlinksy puts this latest update into perspective. “Experts on both sides of the Pacific agree that is not a threat at any distance other than the immediate area and also in the air. Even here in Tokyo, the levels are minuscule and certainly much smaller than that in the United States.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
718
Share Video

2:07
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN AND BRANDON TWICHELL ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy After a third explosion at Japan’s Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant - international observers fear a nuclear meltdown is looming. Nuclear and radiological experts now say the incident is approaching the severity of the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Adding to those concerns - NPR explains - a fire at the plant’s number 4 reactor has experts worried fuel rods have been exposed - leaving open the possibility they could melt and leak radiation into the atmosphere. CNN contributor Jim Walsh says - he’s watching the plant’s primary containment vessel - which is the last line of defense against full radioactive release. He says he’s hoping this is more Three Mile Island than Chernobyl. “You know, Three Mile Island, when it had its problem, the containment vessel held and while there was some radiation out there, the core did not leak out into the environment.” But on ABC’s Good Morning America - nuclear security expert Joe Cirincione says the plant’s design makes hope difficult. He calls the incident -quote- “unprecedented in nuclear power history.” “It’s made worse by the way the Japanese build their reactors. They cluster them together as you just reported. Many of the plants in Japan have four or more units, so what that means is it’s very efficient, but a disaster at one can avalanche into a complicated disaster next door.” 140,000 people have been ordered to stay indoors. And on Tuesday Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced radioactive levels could - quote “have an effect on humans.” According to Canada’s CTV - that public announcement is a step in the right direction AWAY from Chernobyl. “You think of all the people back in the Soviet days who were scrambling to get any information they possibly could, but there was a secretive lid (on the disaster). … Japan appears to have learned from Chernobyl’s mistakes. … the government has been communicating with the public on a daily basis, and emergency measures are in full effect.” According to NPR - as of Tuesday Tokyo Electric Power had evacuated all but 50 of its workers. The ones left behind are working to cool the reactors by pumping in sea water and venting the resulting steam. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos to get daily video updates in your stream. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
1072
Share Video

3:26
BY TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR: CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy A week after the devastating earthquake that rocked Japan, workers are still struggling to get the country’s nuclear crisis under control. Japan’s nuclear agency has upgraded the situation from a four to a five on a 7-level scale, bringing the catastrophe on par with the 1979 Three Mile Island incident in Pennsylvania. New aerial footage from a military helicopter paints a grim picture of the extent of the damage to Japan’s Fukushima reactor, which has seen multiple explosions since the quake and consequent tsunamis. (Video: The Telegraph) The chopper itself was part of an initial tactic in the fight to keep spent nuclear rods from overheating, utilizing a water dumping technique commonly used to fight forest fires -- but strong winds quickly nixed that idea. “Now the focus of the efforts by emergency workers has shifted away from airborne spraying to ground level and a more extensive use of these firetrucks to try to cool and restore power to the reactors. The aim is to get water back into the pools that house spent nuclear fool rods and avert a major radiation leak.” (BBC) Even though the situation has been upgraded to level 5 -- defined by the IAEA as a quote -- “accident with wider consequences” -- Japanese officials say it’s due to new information about damage already done, not the current situation. (IAEA) And Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano assures the international community, their efforts are keeping the reactors stable at least. YUKIO EDANO, JAPANESE CHIEF CABINET SECRETARY (TRANSLATION): “As for reactor number 4, the situation is not as serious as reactors number 2 and 3, but we need to keep adding water to cool them, and be prepared. This is important.” Meanwhile, another high priority goal is to restore power to the plant, which would enable crews to restart generators that power the reactor’s cooling systems. (Video: BBC) The International Atomic Energy Agency says a half-mile power cord has been laid to Fukushima’s reactor number 2 building. But retired nuclear engineer Lake Barrett tells The Washington Post, it won’t be as simple as plugging in a cord. “‘Existing cabling is probably burned,’ Barrett said, meaning crews in bulky radiation suits will have to engineer a high-voltage solution on the fly by boring through thick outer walls and connecting car-size electrical switches and relays.” And while the world watches the battle against further nuclear catastrophe, NBC’s Ann Curry reports -- Japan is a country on edge. ANN CURRY, REPORTER: “Passport centers around the country are full, train stations mobbed. Airlines are scrambling to fly thousands of people out of Tokyo. ... Crowds flocked aboard buses out of Sendai, a city hard-hit by the quake and tsunami, now low on basic necessities. Confusion, anger, and distrust are spreading despite the government’s reassurances about the risks of radiation.” Experts say for now, wind currents are reportedly driving radiation away from Tokyo, Japan’s most-populated city. But a reporter from Global Radio News tells Fox News, those inside the city have been wary of exposure risks. GAVIN BLAIR, REPORTER, GLOBAL RADIO NEWS: “Apparently the staff at the Italian embassy there weren’t trustful of the Japanese government’s pronouncements and took a Geiger counter onto the roof themselves and found that the levels of radiation were actually a fifth of what they were in Rome. So while there has been some panic in Tokyo, levels are back to normal there.” Japan’s National Police Agency has raised the death toll to almost 7,000, and more than 10,000 are still listed as missing. ABC Australia reports there are currently around half a million people living in shelters. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
880
Share Video

3:00
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource breaking video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In world news — efforts to restore the cooling system at Japan’s crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant resume today. Workers were seen spraying water on the buildings that house Reactors 2 and 3. But, as the BBC reports, this is a complicated process. “Steam’s rising from one of the reactors. Yesterday, there was smoke. The authorities admit they don’t know why.” Official: “There’s no detail assessment and analysis to be conclusive, but we can also say today that this the regulation level was exceeded. So monitoring and analysis will continue.” Still in world news — after a wave of defections from his senior army commanders and diplomats, Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh has now accepted an exit strategy by the end of the year. But The New York Times says that may not satisfy demonstrators — especially after Saleh’s bloody crackdown, which killed 45 people last Friday. A government official says details of the plan are still being worked out. And in Libya, an American warplane crashed overnight. The cause of the crash is said to be engine failure, and both crew members are alive and safe. The incident is the first known setback to the Western coalition as it continues to enforce a no-fly zone over the oil-rich country. Meanwhile, Al Jazeera reports, forces loyal to Gaddafi have not ceded ground on two eastern Libyan towns. “Gaddafi’s forces have lost a lot of tanks and heavy armor in the last two days, but they still have plenty more. They are vulnerable to attack from the air. But on the ground, they’re still a force to be reckoned with.” In health news -- Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital makes history as the first U.S. hospital to perform a full facial transplant, giving a 25-year-old Texan a new lease on life. ABC has more. ANCHOR: “The team of more than 30 physicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, and residents worked for more than 15 hours to replace the facial area of patient Dallas Wiens. Dr. Pomahac spoke at a press conference earlier today.” POMAHAC: “The facial tissues were recovered including the skin, underlying musculature nerves, all based on vessels that were reconnected to the recipient in one block.” In entertainment -- Jimmy Kimmel got an unexpected visitor when Charlie Sheen dropped in on a live broadcast -- bringing with him shameless acts of self promotion and affection for the host. CUBAN: “Charlie [Sheen] is a smart guy.” KIMMEL: “He is a smart guy.” CUBAN: “He doesn’t get near the credit he deserves.” SHEEN: “[Expletive]” (Cheering) KIMMEL: “I had this dream before and it doesn’t end well!” SHEEN: “Me too. But mine ends well!” (Video: ABC) Think his behavior is a little over the top? Sheen’s soon-to-be-ex-wife Brooke Mueller thinks so. In Radar Online’s exclusive report, she’s asked a judge to order Sheen to go through a psychological examination before he can again see his two twin boys. Stay with Newsy**** for more analyses on news throughout the day. I’m Jim Flink for Newsy Now — highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
429
Share Video

3:17
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In breaking news -- Indianapolis police have apprehended a shooter who began firing at a middle school this morning injuring one person. The attack took place around 7:30, WRTV was first on the scene. ANCHOR: “The state police are on the scene. Morgan County dispatch has confirmed there has been a shooting that Garfield West Middle School. The newspaper is confirming one person it was shot and that person was shot in the stomach and also we know that one been taken into custody. The school is on a lockdown, these are live shots from the scene.” In world news — three workers at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were injured after getting exposed to extreme levels of radiation — 10,000 times higher than normal. But, as Al Jazeera reports, their heroic actions have now led to a more contained nuclear problem. “Authorities say the workers stepped into pools of contaminated water, as they try to lay cables to bring power to one of the damaged reactors. Fears of a catastrophic meltdown of radioactive material now appear to be receding. Experts say two of the reactors are now safe, four remain volatile.” Still in world news — after a grueling debate among its 28 member countries, NATO is now taking charge of the international military action in Libya. But euronews says NATO’s control may eventually expand. “...the alliance has limited its actions to enforcing the no-fly zone and arms embargo and protecting civilians against attack by Gaddafi’s forces. The coalition will remain responsible for all other aspects of the operation. ... Though NATO will not be taking full military command in Libya, the alliance may yet play a larger part. Turkey’s Foreign Minister says talks are already under way about broadening NATO’s role.” In entertainment -- Harvey Weinstein is making Colin Firth’s role as a stuttering King George IV -- more family-friendly. He’s re-releasing “The King’s Speech” with a PG-13 rating and cutting out the curse words. WTVT reports after 7 Golden Globes, 14 BAFTAs, and 12 Academy Awards -- some are calling it -- censorship. REPORTER: “Because of the language, the new cut will open April 1st, and the star Colin Firth doesn't like this. He stars as King George, whose angry swearing fit helps him overcome his speech problem. Firth says the film should stand as it is. And I understand, because the words that causing this is not a word we use. It's not a good word.” Finally -- it was in 1991 when Whoopi Goldberg won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress -- except she wasn't just high on life when accepting that Oscar. TMZ explains it all. REPORTER: Whoopi Goldberg was stoned when she accepted her Academy Award. VOICE: Yes, the Whoopster was whacked out on the whacky tobaccy when she accepted her academy award in 1991 for ‘Ghost.’ GOLDBERG: I've got to relax. I smoked this wonderful joint. It was the last of my homegrown. And, honey, when he said my name and I popped up, I thought, oh, [expletive]. REPORTER 2: Could you tell? REPORTER: Once you know, you could totally tell. Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your stream. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
622
Share Video

2:14
BY STUART SMITH ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. The partial melt-down of reactors at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power plant has compelled nations around the world to re-evaluate the safety of nuclear power plants, and whether the energy source - is worth the cost. This week, the European Union announced it will begin stress-testing nuclear plants across the continent to see if they can withstand disasters like the earthquake in Japan. A Wall Street Journal Blog calls the action a compromise. “The idea bridges Austria’s demand that nuclear energy be banned in the EU and a stark refusal from France, home to no fewer than 58 nuclear reactors.” In the U.S., nuclear plants have been assessing their own risks. But the president of the Institute of Energy and Environmental Research says regulators tend to protect nuclear power plants from additional oversight. He asserted on MSNBC that by letting plants evaluate themselves, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission doesn’t do its job. “The NRC is reluctant to impose costs on the industry that are reasonable, that would greatly increase safety, and its had official studies from Brookhaven, from the national academies, and it should accept those recommendations. It’s not doing that.” But some analysts say Japan’s situation doesn’t translate to all nuclear plants. Michael Hanlon of the Daily Mail notes the Japanese plant... “..***ntained several design flaws; most notably the questionable decision to store spent fuel rods perilously close to the reactors, on the roof. There seems to have been some skulduggery over the years involving the plant’s operators and the nuclear regulators in Japan. Profits were put before safety, corners were cut, lies were told” Nevertheless, the economic fallout in the nuclear industry is building, and some experts say the so-called “nuclear renaissance” will never come to pass. A TIME article suggests that even before the disaster in Japan, nuclear power didn’t have a bright future. “Private capital still considers atomic energy radioactive, gravitating instead toward natural gas and renewables, whose costs are dropping fast. Nuclear power is expanding only in places where taxpayers and ratepayers can be compelled to foot the bill.” Despite the high cost of nuclear projects, plans for two new reactors in the U.S. moved forward after the developers assured regulators that they would pose no environmental risks. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
565
Share Video

2:01
BY TRACY PFEIFFER Anchor: Jennifer Meckles You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. TEPCO officials have confirmed the discovery of one source of the radioactive water that has been steadily leaking into the Pacific Ocean since Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunamis three weeks ago. VOICE OF TRANSLATOR: “The discovery was made this morning at around 9:30 at the foot of reactor number 2, in the reactor cable pit. There was a 20-centimeter crack in the concrete at the base of the pit. The water was leaking out of that crack into the sea.” (France 24) Reports indicate workers rushed to plug the leak by pouring concrete into the pit, but as NBC’s Lee Cowan explains, questions remain about the tactic’s effectiveness. “The problem is, is they don’t exactly know where the water was coming from in the first place, so the fear is that if they block it up, that hole may actually fill up with more radioactive water, spill out even further. They gotta still find the source of where all this radioactive water is coming from and at this point, that’s still a mystery.” Consequently, authorities say they cannot confirm they’ve stopped the leakage of radioactive water into the sea. And as Bloomberg reports, the situation is growing even more dangerous. “Contaminated seawater near the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant was measured at more than 1,000 millisieverts an hour... Exposure to that level for an hour would trigger nausea and four hours might lead to death within two months, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.” In an interview with CNN, one physicist says even though contaminating ocean water is an issue -- it has to be put on the back-burner to prevent further catastrophe. “I think the radioactive water leaking into the pacific is not the primary concern here. Because radioactive water that leaks into the Pacific will become diluted. I'm more concerned about the radioactive water that's leaking into the ground water supplies and I still say the biggest concern is what's going on inside the reactor cores. Keeping those cores cool is still the single-most important task facing the plant operators at the moment.” The latest reports indicate TEPCO workers have brought in a barge to store contaminated water, and are likely to bring in more sea vessels to help the effort. Follow Newsy on Twitter for more video news updates on the situation in Japan. Transcript by Newsy.
9 Apr 2011
863
Share Video

2:05
The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant will this month begin removing 400 tons of highly irradiated spent fuel in a hugely delicate and unprecedented operation fraught with risk. Nuclear researcher Harvey Wasserman talks with Laura Flanders on GRITtv this week about he radiation threat. In full at GRITtv****. Distributed by OneLoad****
17 Nov 2013
279
Share Video

12:57
Laura Flanders' show streams at GRITtv**** This week, the operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant began the process to remove 400 tons of highly irradiated spent fuel, Nuclear researcher Harvey Wasserman talks about the risks involved and need for world intervention. Distributed by OneLoad****
19 Nov 2013
347
Share Video

2:39
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource headline news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. A fourth explosion at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station has increased radiation levels a hundredfold. Now there are concerns the fuel rods have been exposed. RT reports Japan fears the worst. “Top story now: Japan’s Prime Minister has addressed the nation as fears intensify about a nuclear disaster. The country has also reportedly told the International Atomic Agency that its atomic plant is now releasing radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Well the company running the Fukushima Daiichi has admitted a meltdown is a possibility, following explosions at the complex.” In Libya — Muammar Gaddafi’s forces continue to make progress against insurgent rebels. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty says Gaddafi’s forces have recaptured the town of Zwara, in western Libya. It was one of the first towns the rebels captured in February. Turning to U.S. news -- U.S. President Barack Obama wants the “No Child Left Behind Act” to grow up. WFTV offers details on his plan. OBAMA: “If you want a bright future, you're going to need a college degree or advanced training.” ANCHOR: “The president's plan sets up a new evaluation system for teachers and offers incentives to schools that get parents more involved. It would also fire principals at the worst performing schools. The president wants the law to be rewritten for the start of the next school year.” In entertainment news -- Disney’s new flick “Mars Needs Moms” had one of the worst weekend openings of any 3D movie -- not even coming close to covering its $150 million price tag. WRC says -- 3D just isn’t enough anymore. “The Big failure over the weekend, "Mars Needs Moms". It was supposed to be a can’t-miss kid flick, it finished fifth, opening weekend taking less than seven million bucks.” The Hollywood Reporter talks to a studio marketer who says -- "Who wants to see a mom abandoning you? It's very odd... animation works better when they aren't people. That's why things like gnomes do well." Finally -- after 11 years, the voice of the iconic AFLAC Duck is no more. Gilbert Gottfried cooked his own goose when he made a few tasteless tweets at the expense of Japanese earthquake and tsunami victims. TMZ reports Gottfried terribly-timed tweets included, “Japan is really advanced. They don’t go to the beach. It comes to them.” AFLAC quickly fired the actor and disassociated all connections to him. AFLAC has opened a nationwide casting call to find his replacment. Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making your smarter, faster. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
925
Share Video

2:19
BY YIQIAN ZHANG ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy. “While Americans are watching the situation in Japan, many on the West Coast are trying to protect themselves in case of radiation fallout. People there are rushing to buy potassium iodide. It’s an over-the-counter drug that protects the thyroid from radiation.” (KRCG) In some places such as Los Angeles, the pills are sold out. But does potassium iodide even protect against radiation? A writer for medical blog WebMD says, not really. “It’s important to note that potassium iodide pills protect only the thyroid. They don’t prevent your body from taking in the radiation and don’t help prevent radiation damage to other parts of the body.” (WebMD) And a health expert tells Fox News- the risks associated with the medicine may not be worth it. “It can cause thyroid disease, it can cause allergies, it can cause stomach upset, know as you are vomiting it can cause diarrhea…” (Fox News) Regardless of whether the pills work- a health expert tells KSBW- the U.S. west coast isn’t exactly inside the radiation zone. “The evacuation zone they are moving people to is 12 miles from the nuclear plant. That’s what they are saying is a safe area. We are from five to seven thousand miles from there. Do the math.” (KSBW) But an editor for Bay Citizen argues- with all the ambiguous reports about the radiation levels, it makes sense- people are scared. “Experts we spoke to seem convinced that no matter what happens at Fukushima Daiichi, a radiation cloud blowing across the Pacific won't pose any health hazards in California. But since we don't really know exactly what level of radiation exposure might cause long-term health problems, I'm not sure I believe this.” (Bay Citizen) That editor went on to say definitive answers about radiation levels are in quote “maddeningly short supply.” Still - a BlogHer writer says that’s no reason to panic. “You can either run around like a headless chicken, hightailing it to the closest pharmacy so you can buy hundreds of bottles of potassium iodide, while you constantly wonder when the world will cave in, or you can do your best to be informed -- then take a deep breath -- and let it go.” (BlogHer) According to Google Insights, searches for “potassium iodide” and similar terms have increased more than 5,000 percent over the past week- but only in the U.S. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
364
Share Video

2:38
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR Megan Murphy You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy With fears of a catastrophic melt-down still resonating and the discovery of plutonium now hitting headlines -- media outlets wonder -- is the Japanese government doing all it can to battle its nuclear crisis? “Highly radioactive water has been found for the first time outside one of the reactor buildings at the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant, adding to the mounting problems, officials have also detected plutonium in the soil at the plant.” (Video: Times Now) The Japanese government itself -- continues to insist -- there’s nothing to fear. “Officials insist the plutonium does not pose a health threat. In fact, some of it is decades-old residue from nuclear weapons testing. The latest setbacks are fueling a collapse of confidence in the government’s handling of the nuclear crisis.” (Video: CBS) The New York Post says Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant managers are downplaying the discovery of plutonium. “Plutonium breaks down very slowly and can remain dangerously radioactive for hundreds of thousands of years. The plutonium discovery, from samples taken a week ago, was the latest in a string of sky-is-falling updates that has put Japan and much of the world on edge.” A Japanese government spokesman calls the situation a “delicate balancing act” - as workers try to cool overheating reactors, but at the same time contaminate the water. In an article in The Guardian, a nuclear safety expert says, the Japanese government is sending out mixed signals. "What is fundamentally disturbing the public is reports of drinking water one day being above some limit, and then a day or two later it's suddenly safe to drink. People don't know if the first instance was alarmist or whether the second one was untrue...” Japan’s Prime Minister has put the country on “maximum alert”. MSNBC reports hopes are fading. “It’s hard because a workable solution to get control of the reactors has yet to be reached. The government spokesman simply called it a delicate balancing act, but offered little in the way of any new plan to attack the problem.” ...but the Financial Post argues the simple fear of radiation can be more damaging than the radiation itself--and reports harm in small doses is just a theory, while harm from fear is proven. “The incalculable harm that came of the panic that accompanied Chernobyl cannot be undone. Some 336,000 people in the vicinity of Chernobyl were evacuated from their homes and workplaces, most of them becoming impoverished as a result ... with an epidemic of afflictions among the evacuees that included depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug abuse, terminations of wanted pregnancies, and suicides.” Japan’s Prime Minister says the situation is still quote “unpredictable”. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
5 Apr 2011
1325
Share Video

3:18
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In world news — two highly decorated Western journalists were killed yesterday in the besieged city of Misrata. Now, the UN human rights chief is saying the alleged cluster bomb used by pro-Muammar Gaddafi forces could be a war crime. Here's euronews. "At least 10 civilians are reported dead and more than 100 people wounded in the latest fighting in Misrata. Two western photographers are among those killed. Tim Hetherington, a British-American Oscar-nominated filmmaker working for the US magazine Vanity Fair. He and award-winning American photographer Chris Hondros were among a group of journalists caught in a mortar attack.” In world news — Japan has now imposed a ban on entering an exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nucler Power Plant. People will only enter the area under government supervision. Here’s KSDK. “Japan has declared a 12-mile of evacuated area around its troubled Fukushima nuclear facility. A no-go zone. The area was evacuated after last month's earthquake and tsunami disrupted the plant's cooling system. Because the area is now deemed a no-go zone, people who enter could be jailed. It’s expected to take about six months to bring the reactors into a cold shutdown.” In U.S. news — President Barack Obama appears to be on a mission to get more ‘friends.’ He delivered a town hall speech in the Facebook offices yesterday. Here’s KCNC, with what President Obama had to say. “At Facebook's California headquarters Wednesday he told a young crowd his plan to trim $4 trillion is a better solution than the GOP proposal. He also criticized Republican efforts to lower taxes for the rich while making steep cuts to Medicare and Medicaid.” In sports -- Major League Baseball has had enough of Dodgers owner Frank McCourt’s marital troubles. It says his pending divorce settlement and financial woes are paralyzing the team and now they are taking control. KABC explains this historic decision. ANCHOR: “Major league baseball is making a rare move, taking over the L.A. Dodgers, as a divorce drama involving the team's multimillionaire owners threatens to tear the team apart.” REPORTER: “Things have not been going well for the McCourt's lately. Frank and Jamie are in the middle of a nasty divorce, season ticket sales have plummeted over the past several years. And the dodgers have been struggling to make payroll.” FAN: “The way things have been going recently, it's not a real surprise, no.” REPORTER: “Baseball commissioner, Bud Selig says he's taking control of the dodgers to protect, what he calls, quote, ‘one of the most prestigious franchises in all of sports.’” In entertainment -- Can’t wait for the “Prom” episode of Glee? Neither could one of its extra cast members who revealed the Glee prom king and queen via Twitter. A day later, Fox fired the actress. KVUE has more. “[A] tweet from an extra on "glee" is firestorm at fox. Nicole Crowther, who played a background high school student series revealed the names of the prom king and queen. The show's co- creator, Brad Falchuk responded, ‘Who are you to spoil something talented people have spent months to create?’ He added that he hopes she’s qualified to do something other than entertainment.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
23 Apr 2011
350
Share Video