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3:11
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. (Video: RT) “And we open with breaking news: the United Nations Security Council has moments ago voted on a resolution, imposing a no-fly zone extending over Libya. And that, quote, “all necessary means can be used to protect citizens.” In world news — Agency reports say British and French warplanes would be leading the imposing of the no-fly zone, even as Gaddafi promises retaliation. RT reports the operation could start as early as today — though some facts are still unclear. “Well in theory this no-fly zone could go into action today, Friday. We are hearing from the French government that it will act swiftly and the British cabinet are meeting and from both these governments we are hearing that they could take action within hours. But there are still many unknowns. Who will be involved? Who will have the chain of command? And what will be the involvement of Arab countries?” Still in world news — Japan has upped its nuclear alert level, signaling a higher risk of radiation. The level rose from 4 to 5, on a 1 to 7 scale. Al Jazeera reports — the workers at Fukushima are now getting more help from the outside to battle the possible catastrophic meltdown. “It’s the fire department that is now being called in to help control the situation at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Around 30 teams are getting ready to spray Reactor 3 in an attempt to cool the overheating fuel rods. It’s not going to be easy.” In U.S. news — it looks like National Public Radio may have to be National Private Radio. The House yesterday voted to stop any tax dollars from going to NPR. Denver’s KCNC has more on the budget chop. “Last year NPR received $5 million in federal funding. Republicans say cutting those funds would make fiscal sense. The Democrats are calling it an ideological attack that would deprive local stations from access to programs. One Coloradan congressman said the government and media simply don't mix.” Also in U.S. news -- Homeland Security is stepping up enforcement after alarms sounded in Dallas, Chicago, and Seattle airports. The cause? Radiation levels found on passengers and cargo disembarking from Japan. KATU reports. ANCHOR: “The department of homeland security says it's continuing to check passengers and Freight arriving at the nation's airports and sea terminals.” REPORTER: “Sea-tac officials say any higher radiation - found in a cargo jet - was at extremely low levels...Not dangerous. NAPOLITANO: “We are doing screening of passengers and cargo if there happens to be even a blip of radiation.” In entertainment -- Billy Ray Cyrus is picking up the pieces of his Achey Breaky Heart. He’s called off his divorce and is ready to worked out his marital problems with wife of 17 years, Tish Cyrus. ABC News has more. ANCHOR 1: “They have now called off the divorce. And this is sort of a sneak peek "the view" because they sat down for an interview and he reveals he and Tish are trying to reconcile, get the family to come back together.” ANCHOR 2: “And Miley has had her issues the past few months. Let's hope that can bring the family back to you. Good for you. You rarely hear about -- families coming back.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
816
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3:26
BY TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR: CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy A week after the devastating earthquake that rocked Japan, workers are still struggling to get the country’s nuclear crisis under control. Japan’s nuclear agency has upgraded the situation from a four to a five on a 7-level scale, bringing the catastrophe on par with the 1979 Three Mile Island incident in Pennsylvania. New aerial footage from a military helicopter paints a grim picture of the extent of the damage to Japan’s Fukushima reactor, which has seen multiple explosions since the quake and consequent tsunamis. (Video: The Telegraph) The chopper itself was part of an initial tactic in the fight to keep spent nuclear rods from overheating, utilizing a water dumping technique commonly used to fight forest fires -- but strong winds quickly nixed that idea. “Now the focus of the efforts by emergency workers has shifted away from airborne spraying to ground level and a more extensive use of these firetrucks to try to cool and restore power to the reactors. The aim is to get water back into the pools that house spent nuclear fool rods and avert a major radiation leak.” (BBC) Even though the situation has been upgraded to level 5 -- defined by the IAEA as a quote -- “accident with wider consequences” -- Japanese officials say it’s due to new information about damage already done, not the current situation. (IAEA) And Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano assures the international community, their efforts are keeping the reactors stable at least. YUKIO EDANO, JAPANESE CHIEF CABINET SECRETARY (TRANSLATION): “As for reactor number 4, the situation is not as serious as reactors number 2 and 3, but we need to keep adding water to cool them, and be prepared. This is important.” Meanwhile, another high priority goal is to restore power to the plant, which would enable crews to restart generators that power the reactor’s cooling systems. (Video: BBC) The International Atomic Energy Agency says a half-mile power cord has been laid to Fukushima’s reactor number 2 building. But retired nuclear engineer Lake Barrett tells The Washington Post, it won’t be as simple as plugging in a cord. “‘Existing cabling is probably burned,’ Barrett said, meaning crews in bulky radiation suits will have to engineer a high-voltage solution on the fly by boring through thick outer walls and connecting car-size electrical switches and relays.” And while the world watches the battle against further nuclear catastrophe, NBC’s Ann Curry reports -- Japan is a country on edge. ANN CURRY, REPORTER: “Passport centers around the country are full, train stations mobbed. Airlines are scrambling to fly thousands of people out of Tokyo. ... Crowds flocked aboard buses out of Sendai, a city hard-hit by the quake and tsunami, now low on basic necessities. Confusion, anger, and distrust are spreading despite the government’s reassurances about the risks of radiation.” Experts say for now, wind currents are reportedly driving radiation away from Tokyo, Japan’s most-populated city. But a reporter from Global Radio News tells Fox News, those inside the city have been wary of exposure risks. GAVIN BLAIR, REPORTER, GLOBAL RADIO NEWS: “Apparently the staff at the Italian embassy there weren’t trustful of the Japanese government’s pronouncements and took a Geiger counter onto the roof themselves and found that the levels of radiation were actually a fifth of what they were in Rome. So while there has been some panic in Tokyo, levels are back to normal there.” Japan’s National Police Agency has raised the death toll to almost 7,000, and more than 10,000 are still listed as missing. ABC Australia reports there are currently around half a million people living in shelters. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
873
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1:54
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR: Salem Solomnon You're watching multisource health news analysis from Newsy While media reports say Japanese nuclear power plants are closer to stabilization, high radiation levels are causing trouble elsewhere -- in some Japanese food. The media now points its microphones toward Japanese supermarkets. Milk and spinach are reported to read for higher levels of radiation, even up to 20 miles from the damaged Fukushima plant. (Video: BBC) However, CNN reports no one needs to give up Japanese cuisine. “Before people become alarmed, we need to put this in to context. You need to drink a year’s worth of this milk for it to be equivalent to a CT scan.” ...and Voice of America is on the same page as CNN. It translated a message from Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, who says the food radiation isn’t the biggest concern for his country right now. “He tells reporters there is no immediate health risk and the government is considering regulating shipments of farm products from the affected area.” Despite reports trying to calm the masses, Food Safety News points out radiation news about only a few items is creating panic about all Japanese food -- “...fresh food from Japan is being refused in some areas. Some sushi restaurants in Asia have reportedly taken Japanese seafood off the menu, and Italy has banned Japanese imports altogether.” ---and NTD-TV says Thailand is also urging halt of some Japanese imports. “Thai authorities say they will urge food importers to avoid, or at least reduce, imports of Japanese products, including meat, dairy products, seafood and seaweed.” Finally, a writer for Dawn Wires shares the grim outlook on Japanese products. “Is the rest of world safe? The answer is No. Anything and everything that travels through Japanese air or water is going to be contaminated. Ground water in Japan is already contaminated... It is the fact that radiation now risks basic food supply which makes the Fukushima disaster the worst ever nuclear disaster.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
22 Mar 2011
548
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3:00
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource breaking video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In world news — efforts to restore the cooling system at Japan’s crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant resume today. Workers were seen spraying water on the buildings that house Reactors 2 and 3. But, as the BBC reports, this is a complicated process. “Steam’s rising from one of the reactors. Yesterday, there was smoke. The authorities admit they don’t know why.” Official: “There’s no detail assessment and analysis to be conclusive, but we can also say today that this the regulation level was exceeded. So monitoring and analysis will continue.” Still in world news — after a wave of defections from his senior army commanders and diplomats, Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh has now accepted an exit strategy by the end of the year. But The New York Times says that may not satisfy demonstrators — especially after Saleh’s bloody crackdown, which killed 45 people last Friday. A government official says details of the plan are still being worked out. And in Libya, an American warplane crashed overnight. The cause of the crash is said to be engine failure, and both crew members are alive and safe. The incident is the first known setback to the Western coalition as it continues to enforce a no-fly zone over the oil-rich country. Meanwhile, Al Jazeera reports, forces loyal to Gaddafi have not ceded ground on two eastern Libyan towns. “Gaddafi’s forces have lost a lot of tanks and heavy armor in the last two days, but they still have plenty more. They are vulnerable to attack from the air. But on the ground, they’re still a force to be reckoned with.” In health news -- Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital makes history as the first U.S. hospital to perform a full facial transplant, giving a 25-year-old Texan a new lease on life. ABC has more. ANCHOR: “The team of more than 30 physicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, and residents worked for more than 15 hours to replace the facial area of patient Dallas Wiens. Dr. Pomahac spoke at a press conference earlier today.” POMAHAC: “The facial tissues were recovered including the skin, underlying musculature nerves, all based on vessels that were reconnected to the recipient in one block.” In entertainment -- Jimmy Kimmel got an unexpected visitor when Charlie Sheen dropped in on a live broadcast -- bringing with him shameless acts of self promotion and affection for the host. CUBAN: “Charlie [Sheen] is a smart guy.” KIMMEL: “He is a smart guy.” CUBAN: “He doesn’t get near the credit he deserves.” SHEEN: “[Expletive]” (Cheering) KIMMEL: “I had this dream before and it doesn’t end well!” SHEEN: “Me too. But mine ends well!” (Video: ABC) Think his behavior is a little over the top? Sheen’s soon-to-be-ex-wife Brooke Mueller thinks so. In Radar Online’s exclusive report, she’s asked a judge to order Sheen to go through a psychological examination before he can again see his two twin boys. Stay with Newsy**** for more analyses on news throughout the day. I’m Jim Flink for Newsy Now — highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
428
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3:21
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multiosurce tech news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In Japan — workers of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant have once again been removed from the site. CNN reports more smoke caused the evacuation. “We did get off the phone from Tepco just minutes ago, and they have confirmed that smoke, blackish smoke is rising from Reactor No. 3. They say something is burning, they just don’t know what it is.” Radiation levels in Tokyo’s tap water have now been deemed unfit for infants. Still in world news — clashes between rebels and pro-Gaddafi forces continue in the Libyan cities of Misurata, Ajdabiya and Benghazi. The ever-defiant leader Muammar Gaddafi appeared on Libya’s national TV yesterday, vowing victory to his supporters. But, as the BBC reports, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says people close to his regime might have other ideas. Dominic Kane, BBC: “In an address that was apparently live in Tripoli on Tuesday night, his message to his supporters was unrepentant. Muammar Gaddafi: “I am defiant, my home is here. I am here, I am here, I am here.” Dominic Kane: “But even as he was speaking these words, on American TV came the suggestion that perhaps the Gaddafi regime is now trying to explore its options internationally.” Clinton: “I’m not aware that he personally has reached out, but I do know that people allegedly on his behalf have been reaching out.” Still in the Middle East — tension is in Gaza, as Israel launched air strikes on Gaza City early Wednesday. This -- the latest in a string of clashes between the Israeli army and Palestinian groups. Today’s attack came after a Palestinian rocket fired into Southern Israel on Tuesday. That attack was a response to Israeli mortar fire on Monday which killed four Palestinians. According to the New York Times, the group Hamas has fired more than 60 mortar shells and rockets at Israel since Saturday. Israeli warplanes have also carried multiple attacks. In the tech world -- Blackberry is ready to go head-to-head with Apple in the tablet market. The smart phone maker plans to release its Playbook tablet at a base price of $499 -- the same as Apple’s iPad. WJBK looks at the competition. “Well, Wall Street is saying that this would be the closest thing yet to the iPad killer if there is ever such a thing … the price points are largely the same. 499 to 699 on both devices depending on the size that you get. The sales expectations, widely different. At the high point, 4 million playbooks may be sold this year, compared to 30 million iPads." In entertainment -- Chris Brown has a new album and, it appears, a new set of anger issues. On ABC’s Good Morning America, Robin Roberts probed the R&B star about his altercation with ex-girlfriend Rihanna two years ago. After answering the questions and performing on the show, he stormed off set and trashed a GMA dressing room. Slate has more. “After the taping, Brown broke a window in his dressing room. When confronted by one of the show’s producers, Chris removed his shirt, then left skipping a planned second performance on the show. Just to cap things off Brown tweeted ‘I’m so over people bringing this past [expletive] up. Yet we praise Charlie Sheen and other celebs for their [expletive].’” MTV reports Brown approved the questions about the Rihanna incident before the interview with Roberts -- who insists she did not try to antagonize Brown. She says she’s “pulling for the guy.” Stay with Newsy**** for more analyses on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource tech news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
1040
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3:09
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource headline news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In world news — international coalition efforts to impose a no-fly zone over Libya enters the sixth day, as officials loyal to leader Muammar Gaddafi accuse the attacks of claiming civilian lives. The efforts now face a growing number of international critics. euronews reports. “Witnesses heard loud explosions and saw smoke rising from a military base to the east of the city. Officials later showed journalists the bodies of 18 soldiers and civilians that they claim to be have been killed in the overnight raids. But the US says there’s no civilian casualties as a result of the allied action.” Still in world news — workers have returned once again to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, after a brief evacuation on Wednesday. Al Jazeera reports on the situation they face. “The reactors’ core temperatures have dropped slightly, but they need to maintain the cooling operations. Workers at the plant still face extreme danger. The nuclear and industrial safety agency said three had been exposed to radiation levels above legal limits, and two of them experience burns. A growing list of countries are restricting imports of produce from near the nuclear plant.” In U.S. news — a massive blaze broke out in the Miami International Airport overnight, after a fuel tank caught fire near the refueling area. Miami’s WPLG has more. “...But your jaw just drops when you see this video. Take a look as flames shot up several feet in the air after this fire broke out near the fuel area... At this time we do not know what caused the flames, but we are hearing that though it is out and that no one was hurt, it could affect flights this morning.” Still in U.S. news -- Twitter is getting a tax break. The San Francisco based company is valued on Wall Street at $7 billion and now the city wants to elminate its payroll tax -- the same tax every small business owner forks over every year. KGO reports. ANCHOR: "What at first looked like a win-win for Twitter and the city of San Francisco is becoming a bit more complicated. The mayor and other city officials are offering the micro blogging company a big tax break, but critics, including some other businesses are objecting." REPORTER: "Supervisors are considering a measure to eliminate their payroll tax for up to six years." LAZARUS: "Over 70 percent of registered voters in our poll in February support this legislation." WOMAN: "If I pay my taxes I don’t know why Twitter can’t pay their taxes." In entertainment -- Elizabeth Taylor’s long-time friend Zsa Zsa Gabor is speaking publically about the the actress’ passing -- and her grim fear that she may be the next Hollywood legend to go. WNYW tells more. “Word of Taylor's passing apparently sent her friend Zsa Zsa Gabor back into the hospital. Gabor's hospital tells Radar Online the Zsa Zsa was rushed to the hospital after becoming hysterical over Taylor's death. It comes a month after Jane Russell died. The 94-year-old is said to have told her husband quote, celebrities go in threes and I'm next.” Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Mar 2011
352
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3:17
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In breaking news -- Indianapolis police have apprehended a shooter who began firing at a middle school this morning injuring one person. The attack took place around 7:30, WRTV was first on the scene. ANCHOR: “The state police are on the scene. Morgan County dispatch has confirmed there has been a shooting that Garfield West Middle School. The newspaper is confirming one person it was shot and that person was shot in the stomach and also we know that one been taken into custody. The school is on a lockdown, these are live shots from the scene.” In world news — three workers at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were injured after getting exposed to extreme levels of radiation — 10,000 times higher than normal. But, as Al Jazeera reports, their heroic actions have now led to a more contained nuclear problem. “Authorities say the workers stepped into pools of contaminated water, as they try to lay cables to bring power to one of the damaged reactors. Fears of a catastrophic meltdown of radioactive material now appear to be receding. Experts say two of the reactors are now safe, four remain volatile.” Still in world news — after a grueling debate among its 28 member countries, NATO is now taking charge of the international military action in Libya. But euronews says NATO’s control may eventually expand. “...the alliance has limited its actions to enforcing the no-fly zone and arms embargo and protecting civilians against attack by Gaddafi’s forces. The coalition will remain responsible for all other aspects of the operation. ... Though NATO will not be taking full military command in Libya, the alliance may yet play a larger part. Turkey’s Foreign Minister says talks are already under way about broadening NATO’s role.” In entertainment -- Harvey Weinstein is making Colin Firth’s role as a stuttering King George IV -- more family-friendly. He’s re-releasing “The King’s Speech” with a PG-13 rating and cutting out the curse words. WTVT reports after 7 Golden Globes, 14 BAFTAs, and 12 Academy Awards -- some are calling it -- censorship. REPORTER: “Because of the language, the new cut will open April 1st, and the star Colin Firth doesn't like this. He stars as King George, whose angry swearing fit helps him overcome his speech problem. Firth says the film should stand as it is. And I understand, because the words that causing this is not a word we use. It's not a good word.” Finally -- it was in 1991 when Whoopi Goldberg won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress -- except she wasn't just high on life when accepting that Oscar. TMZ explains it all. REPORTER: Whoopi Goldberg was stoned when she accepted her Academy Award. VOICE: Yes, the Whoopster was whacked out on the whacky tobaccy when she accepted her academy award in 1991 for ‘Ghost.’ GOLDBERG: I've got to relax. I smoked this wonderful joint. It was the last of my homegrown. And, honey, when he said my name and I popped up, I thought, oh, [expletive]. REPORTER 2: Could you tell? REPORTER: Once you know, you could totally tell. Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your stream. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
612
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2:05
The disaster at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power station has made eminently clear that mankind has to look for alternative ways of meeting its energy needs – and quickly. Because demand for energy continues to rise. Today, every second person on the planet lives in a city. In Europe, this figure has passed the 70 percent mark. Urban centers around the globe account for over three quarters of worldwide energy consumption. That’s why the experts are working all-out on developing so-called “Metropolitan Solutions” – environmentally friendly energy supply and utility services concepts for today’s large urban centers.
1 Apr 2011
178
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2:14
BY STUART SMITH ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. The partial melt-down of reactors at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power plant has compelled nations around the world to re-evaluate the safety of nuclear power plants, and whether the energy source - is worth the cost. This week, the European Union announced it will begin stress-testing nuclear plants across the continent to see if they can withstand disasters like the earthquake in Japan. A Wall Street Journal Blog calls the action a compromise. “The idea bridges Austria’s demand that nuclear energy be banned in the EU and a stark refusal from France, home to no fewer than 58 nuclear reactors.” In the U.S., nuclear plants have been assessing their own risks. But the president of the Institute of Energy and Environmental Research says regulators tend to protect nuclear power plants from additional oversight. He asserted on MSNBC that by letting plants evaluate themselves, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission doesn’t do its job. “The NRC is reluctant to impose costs on the industry that are reasonable, that would greatly increase safety, and its had official studies from Brookhaven, from the national academies, and it should accept those recommendations. It’s not doing that.” But some analysts say Japan’s situation doesn’t translate to all nuclear plants. Michael Hanlon of the Daily Mail notes the Japanese plant... “..***ntained several design flaws; most notably the questionable decision to store spent fuel rods perilously close to the reactors, on the roof. There seems to have been some skulduggery over the years involving the plant’s operators and the nuclear regulators in Japan. Profits were put before safety, corners were cut, lies were told” Nevertheless, the economic fallout in the nuclear industry is building, and some experts say the so-called “nuclear renaissance” will never come to pass. A TIME article suggests that even before the disaster in Japan, nuclear power didn’t have a bright future. “Private capital still considers atomic energy radioactive, gravitating instead toward natural gas and renewables, whose costs are dropping fast. Nuclear power is expanding only in places where taxpayers and ratepayers can be compelled to foot the bill.” Despite the high cost of nuclear projects, plans for two new reactors in the U.S. moved forward after the developers assured regulators that they would pose no environmental risks. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for updates in your feed. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
556
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2:05
The disaster at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power station has made eminently clear that mankind has to look for alternative ways of meeting its energy needs – and quickly. Because demand for energy continues to rise. Today, every second person on the planet lives in a city. In Europe, this figure has passed the 70 percent mark. Urban centers around the globe account for over three quarters of worldwide energy consumption. That’s why the experts are working all-out on developing so-called “Metropolitan Solutions” – environmentally friendly energy supply and utility services concepts for today’s large urban centers.
6 Apr 2011
166
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2:01
BY TRACY PFEIFFER Anchor: Jennifer Meckles You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. TEPCO officials have confirmed the discovery of one source of the radioactive water that has been steadily leaking into the Pacific Ocean since Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunamis three weeks ago. VOICE OF TRANSLATOR: “The discovery was made this morning at around 9:30 at the foot of reactor number 2, in the reactor cable pit. There was a 20-centimeter crack in the concrete at the base of the pit. The water was leaking out of that crack into the sea.” (France 24) Reports indicate workers rushed to plug the leak by pouring concrete into the pit, but as NBC’s Lee Cowan explains, questions remain about the tactic’s effectiveness. “The problem is, is they don’t exactly know where the water was coming from in the first place, so the fear is that if they block it up, that hole may actually fill up with more radioactive water, spill out even further. They gotta still find the source of where all this radioactive water is coming from and at this point, that’s still a mystery.” Consequently, authorities say they cannot confirm they’ve stopped the leakage of radioactive water into the sea. And as Bloomberg reports, the situation is growing even more dangerous. “Contaminated seawater near the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant was measured at more than 1,000 millisieverts an hour... Exposure to that level for an hour would trigger nausea and four hours might lead to death within two months, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.” In an interview with CNN, one physicist says even though contaminating ocean water is an issue -- it has to be put on the back-burner to prevent further catastrophe. “I think the radioactive water leaking into the pacific is not the primary concern here. Because radioactive water that leaks into the Pacific will become diluted. I'm more concerned about the radioactive water that's leaking into the ground water supplies and I still say the biggest concern is what's going on inside the reactor cores. Keeping those cores cool is still the single-most important task facing the plant operators at the moment.” The latest reports indicate TEPCO workers have brought in a barge to store contaminated water, and are likely to bring in more sea vessels to help the effort. Follow Newsy on Twitter for more video news updates on the situation in Japan. Transcript by Newsy.
9 Apr 2011
845
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3:20
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. In U.S. news — President Barack Obama has officially launched his re-election campaign early today, even as a possible government shutdown looms. Here’s CNBC. “It is official. President Obama opening his 2012 re-election campaign today with a website announcement and emails and text messages to supporters. In the meantime, lawmakers have until midnight Friday to agree on a budget deal for this year or face a government shutdown. President Obama called House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid this weekend urging a compromise.” In world news — the Tokyo Electric Power Company has begun releasing nearly 12,000 tons of radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean. RT reports the contaminated water has been exposed to 100 times of normal radiation — a relatively low level. “A spokesman for the facility says it’s necessary to free up storage for highly contaminated water, but insisted the waste won’t cause any serious harm. Japanese officials predict months of leaks from the Fukushima Power Plant, as workers struggle to plug a damaged reactor.” Still in world news — panic in Ivory Coast’s main city of Abidjan, as residents anticipate a final battle between troops loyal to two presidential rivals. euronews reports French troops are now controlling the Abidjan airport, to help ease the evacuation of foreigners. “Inhabitants of Abidjan are terrified to leave their homes. The first evacuations of foreigners have begun. With peacekeepers in its former colony, France is helping secure the safety of its nationals. But a key aide to incumbent president Laurent Gbagbo accused the French of acting like an army of occupation. Their U.N. mandate does not give them the authority to occupy the airport of a sovereign state, he says.” In U.S. news -- traveling on Southwest Airlines? Be sure to check your flight. After a flight on Friday landed with a three foot hole in its fusaluage, the airliner won’t let another fractured plane slip through the cracks. It’s double checking its fleet for the same issues, but causing a travel headache. KGO has more. JOHN NANCE: "’This is basically something that comes about with age and with utilization, and that's what they'll be focused in on. There's absolutely no indication here that this is something that's fleet-wide,’” REPORTER: “As federal inspectors investigate Friday's emergency landing of a Southwest flight in Arizona, the airline cancelled 300 flights for a second day in a row to inspect 79 of its Boeing 737s -- planes that have not had their aluminum skin replaced. The inspections are expected to take several days.” In entertainment -- Prince William and Kate Middleton are learning that not all fairy tales have a happy ending. The soon-to-be-royal couple is rumored to be signing a prenuptial agreement to protect William’s $45 million net worth. “The Guardian reports both sides of the isle make a comfortable living, but a tough economy could spark the idea of protecting their assets. It says, “Neither [William nor Kate] are likely to be complacent about money – with Kate's parents mere business millionaires, and the royals facing their own budget cuts.” If the documents are drawn up it will be the first prenup on record in the royal family history.” Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For News Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
615
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2:37
BY ALLIE SPILLYARDS AND TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy After days of pumping water into the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to cool damaged reactors, Japanese emergency workers have another problem: what do they do with all that water? With more than 11,000 tons of radioactive water needing somewhere to go and more runoff on the way, Tokyo Electric has turned to the Pacific. LEE COWAN: “Engineers have now had to prioritize. So what they’re going to do is they’re going to pump several tanks worth of lesser radioactive water directly into the ocean that is to make room for the really radioactive water.” (NBC) On-site storage tanks have already filled up, and a writer for TIME explains -- the decision to release water into the ocean is part of an ongoing struggle restore the plant’s electric-powered cooling systems. “The problem is maddeningly circular: workers can’t safely fix the power connection while there is so much irradiated water around, but workers can’t stop dousing the plant with water while the electricity is down. Dealing with the water will require its own processes.” Meanwhile, highly radioactive water has been gushing into the ocean through a large crack in a pit at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Polymore, cement, sawdust and shredded newspaper have all been used to try and stop the leak. The Wall Street Journal’s Mariko Sanchanta talks about the frustration. “It does sound pretty haphazard. When we heard that they were throwing in shredded newspaper yesterday, three bags full. But we don’t have any idea the volumes they’re using, the quantities ... but as far as we know the crack has not been sealed yet.” Water leaking from the pit has been measured at as much as 1,000 millisieverts - meaning just 15 minutes of exposure would tap out workers’ yearly radiation allowance of 250 millisieverts. But as a writer for the BBC reports, THAT water will not be purposefully dumped. “Tepco says the low-radioactive water it intends to deliberately release into the sea has iodine-131 levels that are about 100 times the legal limit. But it stressed in a news conference on Monday that if people ate fish and seaweed caught near the plant every day for a year, their radiation exposure would still be just 0.6 millisieverts. Normal background radiation levels are on the order of 2 millisieverts per year.” And while there has been some concern over radiation reaching shores across the Pacific, ABC’s Neal Karlinksy puts this latest update into perspective. “Experts on both sides of the Pacific agree that is not a threat at any distance other than the immediate area and also in the air. Even here in Tokyo, the levels are minuscule and certainly much smaller than that in the United States.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
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BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource breaking news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. “The radiation and sea water near Japan's crippled nuclear power plant is reportedly 7.5 million times the legal limit. The plant has been pouring radiation into the ocean ever since last month's earthquake and tsunami.” (Video: KPIX) This, as the country is also setting up safety radiation standards for fish, after catches near the Fukushima plant was found with high levels of radioactive iodine. Still in world news — the Ivory Coast city of Abidjan witnessed its fiercest battle yet last night, as U.N. and French forces join the assault against incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo. Here’s euronews. “His rival Alassane Ouattara’s forces have launched the major assault to get Ivory Coast’s reluctant-to-leave leader out of power once and for all. Gbagbo’s whereabouts today are not known but, as pressure mounts, he may be negotiating his surrender, according to the Ouattara camp.” Still in world news -- some Haitian voters are singing the praises of newly elected president Michael Martelly. Last November it looked like the singer was out of the race in what many called a fraudulent election. Martelly rallied his supporters in time for the runoff vote. CNN has more. “To Haiti where a musician beats a former first lady in the race for president. Singer Michael Martelly is the next president of Haiti taking victory over Mirlande Manigat. The results were announced yesterday, Martelly earned nearly 68% of the vote. Supporters celebrated in the streets after that announcement. The runoff vote was held last month after a general election where violent protests broke out over accusations of fraud.” In U.S. news — Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid will meet with President Barack Obama today to talk budget to avoid a government shutdown. “Some people will tell you if they don’t find some common ground, if they don’t find a deal by tonight... Given house rules which require 3-day posting of these bills, you’re getting right up against a government shutdown. You know, if they weren’t able to reach an accomodation, they could probably pass some short term measure and get it done, but this threat of a government shutdown is pretty real.” (Video: MSNBC) In entertainment -- M. Night Shyamalan will be using the star firepower of Will Smith and his son Jayden for his upcoming sci-fi thriller. The Sixth Sense director is known for his twists and turns, but this time the catch is -- he’ll save his Hollywood career. Entertainment Weekly reports Shyamalan could use the help after his most recent flicks, “The Happening” and “The Last Airbender” failed to rally audiences. E! Online adds the Smith family powerhouse could be just the jump start he needs for a rebound. In a statement Shyamalan expressed -- this is his “dream project.” Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter, faster. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get news with analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
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BY PAUL ROLFE ANCHOR JIM FLINK You're watching multisource environment news analysis from Newsy Radioactive water continues to spill from the damaged Fukushima reactors, and the fishing industry is now on full alert. On Tuesday, Japanese officials adopted their first-ever rules regarding safe radiation levels in fish -- but the Wall Street Journal reports levels are already higher than that -- much higher. “The government says it’s not dangerous to human health. However, at the same time, they found fish 50 miles away from the nuclear plant with an unusual amount of radioactivity and that’s scaring some people... especially the fishing industry that’s all worried now that people are not going to buy, want to buy the fish even if the fish is caught miles -- hundreds of miles away from the reactors.” The LA Times reports water radiation levels are 7.5 million times the legal limit and the radiation in fish is at least twice the newly set legal limit. Fox News says the real risk is with the big fish. “The government is saying, well it looks like small fish will actually be absorbing this, but the problem is when the bigger fish come along and start eating them, and those are the kind of fish that end up further, much further down along the coast line towards Tokyo, that ends up getting into the food chain. People could become sick as a result of that, but they’re saying that could be some weeks perhaps months down the line. But it is very much a real risk.” NPR spoke to Dr. Masashi Kusakabe, an expert on ocean radiation. He says big fish will never stick around the Fukushima area long enough to be contaminated -- the biggest threat to fishing markets is actually fear. Dr. Kusakabe: “Most people now think, Oh its very dangerous to eat fish in Japan or fish around its coast. But I think it’s very safe. So now is your chance to eat fish because its cheap.” Reporter: “Are you still eating fish?” Dr. Kusakabe: “Oh of course, why not?” Meanwhile, Tepco -- the power company that owns the reactors -- is offering about $240,000 to each of the ten surrounding towns voluntarily. Officials from the city of Namie tell the LA Times they are refusing because they have other pressing matters. "The coastal areas of Namie were hit hard by the earthquake and the tsunami but because of the radiation and the evacuation order we haven't had a chance to conduct a search for the 200 people who are missing... Why would we use our resources to hand out less than 1,000 yen ($12) to every resident?" Many countries are weary of food from Japan and have restricted or stopped Japanese imports. The EU has recommended radiation testing of all Japanese food imports. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
9 Apr 2011
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BY: SAMUEL JOSEPH ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY You're watching multisource global news analysis from Newsy. Energy concerns rise as Japan is hit with the largest aftershock since the March 11th 8.9 magnitude earthquake. Thursday’s 7.1 magnitude aftershock knocked out power to more than two million homes in northeast Japan, lasting more than a minute and killing three people while injuring hundreds more. And it’s not just household outages that have people worried. The Fukushima nuclear reactors -- which have been front and center since the March 11 quake -- did not suffer significant further damage this round. But ABC reports, other plants were not so fortunate. NEAL KARLINSKY: “At two other facilities, the Onogawa Nuclear Plant and the Higashidori Plant, the quake caused power outages that forced both on to emergency generators to keep fuel rods safe. At Onogawa, water from spent fuel roads actually spilled on to the floor, but was contained. Experts monitoring the crisis worry that more strain is being put on reactors that are already overburdened.” Five coal-powered plants were also shut down, increasing the strain on Japan’s power sources. With the anticipated peak in electricity usage during the upcoming summer months, the Japanese government has taken steps to prevent widespread power grid failure. According to American Chronicle... “...the government appears to believe massive blackouts would occur unless measures backed by the force of law are in place. Such concern has prompted the government to call on leading companies to reduce electricity consumption by 25 percent to 30 percent over last year.” Households are being asked to cut electricity usage between 15 to 20 percent. This has prompted some to buy energy efficient bulbs and appliances -- and the BBC reports, businesses are feeling the squeeze as well. TOSHIO NAKAMURA: “We are proposing changes in the way we operate, like changing hours to work during the night or in the early morning. Some shops can close on Monday, and others on Tuesday to have some sort of rotating system. We’re not using elevators, turning down lights and not having the air conditioning on too cold.” The issues with the Onogawa and Higashidori plants, along with the ongoing crisis at the Fukushima plant, have caused serious doubts about the future of nuclear power in Japan. According to officials interviewed by the Denki Shimbun - the future of nuclear power is still unclear. “Depending on the future development of the accident, we could be drawn into a situation where we will temporarily not be able to support nuclear power, which had been actively promoted by the national government as national policy.” More aftershocks are expected for the next few months. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your stream. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy
12 Apr 2011
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