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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the two kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through two thin tubes of muscle called ureters, one on each side of the bladder. The bladder stores urine. The muscles of the bladder wall remain relaxed while the bladder fills with urine. As the bladder fills to capacity, signals sent to the brain tell a person to find a toilet soon. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. In men the urethra is long, while in women it is short. Why are the kidneys important? The kidneys are important because they keep the composition, or makeup, of the blood stable, which lets the body function. They prevent the buildup of wastes and extra fluid in the body keep levels of electrolytes stable, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate make hormones that help regulate blood pressure make red blood cells bones stay strong How do the kidneys work? The kidney is not one large filter. Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine.
15 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Your kidneys aren’t very big each is about the size of your fist but they do important work. They keep you healthy by maintaining just the right balance of water and other substances inside your body. Unfortunately, if your kidneys start to malfunction, you might not realize it for a long while. Kidney disease usually doesn’t make you feel sick until the problem becomes serious and irreversible. March is National Kidney Month, a perfect time to learn more about how to keep your kidneys healthy and how to catch problems early. Your kidneys are 2 reddish, bean-shaped organs located on either side of your spine in the middle of your back. Their main job is to filter your blood. Each kidney contains about a million tiny filters that can process around 40 gallons of fluid every day about enough to fill a house’s hot water heater. When blood passes through the kidney, the filters sift and hold onto the substances your body might need, such as certain nutrients and much of the water. Harmful wastes and extra water and nutrients are routed to the nearby bladder and flushed away as urine. Your kidneys also produce several hormones. These hormones help to control your blood pressure, make red blood cells and activate vitamin D, which keeps your bones strong. We all lose a little of our kidney function as we get older. People can even survive with just one kidney if they donate the other to a friend or family member. But when kidney function drops because of an underlying kidney disease, it’s something to be concerned about. Toxins and extra water can build up in your blood. Falling hormone production can cause other problems. About 1 in 10 adults nationwide, or about 20 million people, have at least some signs of kidney damage. There are different types of kidney disease. Most strike both kidneys at the same time, harming the tiny filters called nephrons and reducing their filtering ability. When damage to nephrons
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes. High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when the pressure of your blood against the walls of your blood vessels increases. If uncontrolled, or poorly controlled, high blood pressure can be a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and chronic kidney disease. Also, chronic kidney disease can cause high blood pressure. Other conditions that affect the kidneys are: * Glomerulonephritis, a group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney's filtering units. These disorders are the third most common type of kidney disease. * Inherited diseases, such as polycystic kidney disease, which causes large cysts to form in the kidneys and damage the surrounding tissue. * Malformations that occur as a baby develops in its mother's womb. For example, a narrowing may occur that prevents normal outflow of urine and causes urine to flow back up to the kidney. This causes infections and may damage the kidneys. * Lupus and other diseases that affect the body's immune system. * Obstructions caused by problems like kidney stones, tumors or an enlarged prostate gland in men. * Repeated urinary infections.
17 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Chronic kidney failure, as opposed to acute kidney failure, is a slow and gradually progressive disease. Even if one kidney stops functioning, the other can carry out normal functions. It is not usually until the disease is fairly well advanced and the condition has become severe that signs and symptoms are noticeable; by which time most of the damage is irreversible. It is important that people who are at high risk of developing kidney disease have their kidney functions regularly checked. Early detection can significantly help prevent serious kidney damage. The most common signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease include: anemia blood in urine dark urine decreased mental alertness decreased urine output edema - swollen feet, hands, and ankles face if edema is severe fatigue tiredness hypertension (high blood pressure insomnia itchy skin, can become persistent loss of appetite male inability to get or maintain an erection erectile dysfunction more frequent urination, especially at night muscle cramps muscle twitches nausea pain on the side or mid to lower back panting shortness of breath protein in urine sudden change in bodyweight unexplained headaches
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Kidneys carry out the complex system of filtration in our bodies - excess waste and fluid material are removed from the blood and excreted from the body. In most cases, kidneys can eliminate most waste materials that our body produces. However, if the blood flow to the kidneys is affected, they are not working properly because of damage or disease, or if urine outflow is obstructed, problems can occur. In the majority of cases, progressive kidney damage is the result of a chronic disease a long-term disease, such as: Diabetes - chronic kidney disease is linked to diabetes types 1 and 2. If the patient's diabetes is not well controlled, excess sugar glucose can accumulate in the blood. Kidney disease is not common during the first 10 years of diabetes; it more commonly occurs 15-25 years after diagnosis of diabetes. Hypertension high blood pressure - high blood pressure can damage the glomeruli - parts of the kidney involved in filtering waste products. Obstructed urine flow - if urine flow is blocked it can back up into the kidney from the bladder vesicoureteral reflux. Blocked urine flow increases pressure on the kidneys and undermines their function. Possible causes include an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, or a tumor. Kidney diseases - including polycystic kidney disease, pyelonephritis, or glomerulonephritis. Kidney artery stenosis - the renal artery narrows or is blocked before it enters the kidney. Certain toxins - including fuels, solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, and lead and lead-based paint, pipes, and soldering materials. Even some types of jewelry have toxins, which can lead to chronic kidney failure. Fetal developmental problem - if the kidneys do not develop properly in the unborn baby while it is developing in the womb. Systemic lupus erythematosis - an autoimmune disease. The body's own immune system attacks the kidneys as though they were foreign tissue.
20 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 There is no current cure for chronic kidney disease. However, some therapies can help control the signs and symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, and slow the progression of the disease. Patients with chronic kidney disease typically need to take a large number of medications. Treatments include: Anemia treatment Hemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that carries vital oxygen around the body. If hemoglobin levels are low, the patient has anemia. Some kidney disease patients with anemia will require blood transfusions. A patient with kidney disease will usually have to take iron supplements, either in the form of daily ferrous sulphate tablets, or occasionally in the form of injections. Phosphate balance People with kidney disease may not be able to eliminate phosphate from their body properly. Patients will be advised to reduce their nutritional phosphate intake - this usually means reducing consumption of dairy products, red meat, eggs, and fish. Vitamin D Patients with kidney disease typically have low levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones. The vitamin D we obtain from the sun or from food has to be activated by the kidneys before the body can use it. Patients may be given alfacalcidol, or calcitriol. High blood pressure High blood pressure is a common problem for patients with chronic kidney disease. It is important to bring the blood pressure down to protect the kidneys, and subsequently slow down the progression of the disease. Fluid retention People with chronic kidney disease need to be careful with their fluid intake. Most patients will be asked to restrict their fluid intake. If the kidneys do not work properly, the patient is much more susceptible to fluid build-up. Skin itching Antihistamines, such as chlorphenamine, may help alleviate symptoms of itching. Anti-sickness medications If toxins build up in the body because the kidneys don't work properly, patients
23 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A doctor will check for signs and ask the patient about symptoms. The following tests may also be ordered: Blood test - a blood test may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease. Urine test - a urine test helps find out whether there is either blood or protein in the urine. Kidney scans - kidney scans may include a magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan, computed tomography CT scan, or an ultrasound scan. The aim is to determine whether there are any blockages in the urine flow. These scans can also reveal the size and shape of the kidneys - in advanced stages of kidney disease the kidneys are smaller and have an uneven shape. Kidney biopsy - a small sample of kidney tissue is extracted and examined for cell damage. An analysis of kidney tissue makes it easier to make a precise diagnosis of kidney disease. Chest X-ray - the aim here is to check for pulmonary edema fluid retained in the lungs. Glomerular filtration rate GFR - GFR is a test that measures the glomerular filtration rate - it compares the levels of waste products in the patient's blood and urine. GFR measures how many milliliters of waste the kidneys can filter per minute. The kidneys of healthy individuals can typically filter over 90 ml per minute. Changes in the GFR rate can assess how advanced the kidney disease is. In the UK, and many other countries, kidney disease stages are classified as follows: Stage 1 - GFR rate is normal. However, evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 2 - GFR rate is lower than 90 milliliters, and evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 3 - GFR rate is lower than 60 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 4 - GRF rate is lower than 30 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease
25 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The following conditions or situations are linked to a higher risk of developing kidney disease: a family history of kidney disease age - chronic kidney disease is much more common among people over 60 atherosclerosis bladder obstruction chronic glomerulonephritis congenital kidney disease kidney disease which is present at birth diabetes - one of the most common risk factors hypertension lupus erythematosis overexposure to some toxins sickle cell disease some medications Complications of chronic kidney disease If the chronic kidney disease progresses to kidney failure, the following complications are possible: anemia central nervous system damage dry skin - or skin color changes fluid retention hyperkalemia - blood potassium levels rise, which can result in heart damage insomnia lower sex drive male erectile dysfunction ostemalacia - bones become weak and break easily pecarditis - the sac-like membrane that envelops the heart (pericardium) becomes inflamed stomach ulcers weak immune system
28 Apr 2017
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Your kidneys filter extra water and wastes out of your blood and make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure so that your body can stay healthy. Read more about what your kidneys do. Kidney disease means that the kidneys are damaged and can't filter blood like they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in the body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health. For most people, kidney damage occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. This is called chronic kidney disease. When someone has a sudden change in kidney function—because of illness, or injury, or have taken certain medications—this is called acute kidney injury. This can occur in a person with normal kidneys or in someone who already has kidney problems. Kidney disease is a growing problem. More than 20 million Americans may have kidney disease and many more are at risk. Anyone can develop kidney disease, regardless of age or race. The main risk factors for developing kidney disease are: Diabetes, High blood pressure, Cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) disease, and A family history of kidney failure. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys over many years.
7 Jun 2017
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Most CKD in the U.S. has one of two causes: type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure—or both at the same time. These two health problems cause 70% of all kidney failure in the United States. They also cause heart disease and strokes. So, keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure in check can help your whole body. Your kidneys may be small, but they perform many vital functions that help maintain your overall health, including filtering waste and excess fluids from your blood. Serious kidney disease may lead to complete kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatments or a kidney transplant to stay alive. While effective treatments are available for many kidney diseases, people are sometimes unaware that kidney disease can often be prevented. The following are the ten major causes of kidney disease. In the United States the two leading causes of kidney failure, also called end stage kidney disease or ESRD, are diabetes (also called Type 2, or adult onset diabetes) and high blood pressure. When these two diseases are controlled by treatment, the associated kidney disease can often be prevented or slowed down. Many effective drugs are available to treat high blood pressure. In addition, healthy lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and regular exercise, often help to control, and may even help to prevent, high blood pressure. Careful control of blood sugar in diabetics helps to prevent such complications as kidney disease, coronary heart disease and stroke. When diabetics have associated high blood pressure, special drugs called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may help to protect their kidney function.
8 Jun 2017
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When you know the symptoms of chronic kidney disease (CKD), you can get treatment and feel your best. CKD symptoms can be subtle. Some people don’t have any symptoms — or don’t think they do. If you have one or more of the 15 symptoms below, or worry about kidney problems, see a doctor for blood and urine tests. Many of the symptoms on this list can be caused by other health problems. The only way to know the cause of YOUR symptoms is to see your doctor. Fatigue – being tired all of the time Why this happens: Healthy kidneys make a hormone called erythropoietin (a-rith'- ro-po'- uh-tin), or EPO, that tells your body to make oxygen-carrying red blood cells. As the kidneys fail, they make less EPO. With fewer red blood cells to carry oxygen, your muscles and brain tire very quickly. This is anemia, and it can be treated. Feeling cold – when others are warm Why this happens: Anemia can make you feel cold all the time, even in a warm room. Shortness of breath – after very little effort Why this happens: Being short of breath can be related to the kidneys in two ways. First, extra fluid in the body can build up in the lungs. And second, anemia (a shortage of oxygen-carrying red blood cells) can leave your body oxygen-starved and short of breath.
9 Jun 2017
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* medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease that cause damage to the small blood vessels within the kidneys * hereditary kidney disease such as polycystic kidney disease or Alport's syndrome * glomerulonephritis (inflammation and damage of the filtering components of the kidney) that is inherited or caused by other medical problems (e.g., lupus, diabetes, amyloidosis) * reflux nephropathy, a condition where urine flows from the bladder back to the kidneys, causing damage to the kidneys * blockage of the urinary tract as a result of birth defects, prostate problems, kidney stones, or tumours * medications that can cause permanent damage to the kidneys (e.g., acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, cisplatin, lithium)
17 Jun 2017
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The following conditions or situations are linked to a higher risk of developing kidney disease: a family history of kidney disease age - chronic kidney disease is much more common among people over 60 atherosclerosis bladder obstruction chronic glomerulonephritis congenital kidney disease kidney disease which is present at birth diabetes - one of the most common risk factors hypertension lupus erythematosis overexposure to some toxins sickle cell disease some medications Complications of chronic kidney disease If the chronic kidney disease progresses to kidney failure, the following complications are possible: anemia central nervous system damage dry skin - or skin color changes fluid retention hyperkalemia - blood potassium levels rise, which can result in heart damage insomnia
19 Jun 2017
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You are more likely to develop kidney disease if you have diabetes high blood pressure heart disease a family history of kidney failure What can I do to keep my kidneys healthy? You can protect your kidneys by preventing or managing health conditions that cause kidney damage, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The steps described below may help keep your whole body healthy, including your kidneys. During your next medical visit, you may want to ask your health care provider about your kidney health. Early kidney disease may not have any symptoms, so getting tested may be the only way to know your kidneys are healthy. Your health care provider will help decide how often you should be tested. See a provider right away if you develop a urinary tract infection (UTI), which can cause kidney damage if left untreated. Make healthy food choices Choose foods that are healthy for your heart and your entire body: fresh fruits, fresh or frozen vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products. Eat healthy meals, and cut back on salt and added sugars. Aim for less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day. Try to have less than 10 percent of your daily calories come from added sugars. Tips for making healthy food choices Cook with a mix of spices instead of salt. Choose veggie toppings such as spinach, broccoli, and peppers for your pizza. Try baking or broiling meat, chicken, and fish instead of frying. Serve foods without gravy or added fats. Try to choose foods with little or no added sugar.
23 Jun 2017
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With chronic kidney disease, the kidneys don’t usually fail all at once. Instead, kidney disease often progresses slowly over a period of years. This is good news because if CKD is caught early, medicines and lifestyle changes may help slow its progress and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible. Five stages of chronic kidney disease To help improve the quality of care for people with kidney disease, the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) created a guideline to help doctors identify each level of kidney disease. The NKF divided kidney disease into five stages. When the doctor knows what stage of kidney disease a person has they can provide the best care, as each stage calls for different tests and treatments. If you have stage 4 kidney disease, it is important for you to: Learn what you can do to keep kidney disease from getting worse - and do it! Do your part to manage the complications of kidney disease Heart and blood vessel problems Anemia (low red blood cell count) Bone problems High blood pressure
26 Jun 2017
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Kidney disease often goes undetected in the general population, but children and adolescents are at an even greater risk due to the nature of the causes of the diseases and the ambiguity of the symptoms. In adults, 90% of cases are related to glomerular based renal disease caused by diabetes, hypertension and glomerulonephritis, which cues physicians to suspect kidney disease. In children, 70% of CKD is associated with tubulointerstitial disease and lack the obvious symptoms such as hematuria (red blood cells in the urine), hypertension (high blood pressure) or edema (swelling). (1) Adding to this difficulty, children might not be aware of some of the changes that are impacting their body and will not always let their parents know of potential issues. Common symptoms for children are: Swelling (even mild) of the hands and feet and/or puffiness around the eyes caused by excess fluid build-up, to the point where the child’s ability to move around normally is compromised After initial swelling, socks or a belt can leave an indentation in the skin that will persist Lack of or decrease in appetite. In children with ESRD it is especially important to keep their appetite up because transplant eligibility is based partially on growth.
28 Jun 2017
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