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The gallbladder isn't an organ that gets a lot of attention — unless it's causing you pain. The gallbladder is a little sac that stores bile from the liver, and it's found just beneath your liver. The gallbladder releases bile, via the cystic duct, into the small intestine to help break down the foods you eat — particularly fatty foods. Typically the gallbladder doesn't cause too many problems or much concern, but if something slows or blocks the flow of bile from the gallbladder, a number of problems can result. What Can Go Wrong Some common gallbladder problems include: Gallstones (cholelithiasis) This is the condition when small stones, or sometimes larger ones, develop inside the gallbladder. Gallstones may cause pain known as biliary colic (see below), but about 90 percent of people with gallstones will have no symptoms. Most symptomatic gallstones have been present for a number of years. For unknown reasons, if you have gallstones for more than 10 years, they are less likely to cause symptoms.
13 Aug 2017
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Some common gallbladder problems include: Gallstones (cholelithiasis) Gallstones are solid masses of cholesterol (or pigment) of different sizes. Gallstones occur when high levels of fat and bile cause crystals to form. These crystals may combine over time and expand into stones. Stones can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. They may or may not cause symptoms. Common bile duct stones (choledocholithiasis) Bile is transported from the gallbladder via small tubes and deposited in the common bile duct. From there, it is moved to the small intestine. Sometimes, gallstones can lodge or form in the common bile duct. Most often, these stones begin their life in the gallbladder and migrate to the common bile duct; this is referred to as a secondary stone or a secondary common bile duct stone. If the stone forms within the duct itself, it is called a primary stone, or primary common bile duct stone. These are less common but are more likely to cause an infection than secondary stones.
15 Aug 2017
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What is gallbladder pain? Gallbladder pain is (often misspelled "gall bladder") an all-inclusive term used to describe any pain due to disease related to the gallbladder. The major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. Symptoms vary and may be triggered by eating certain foods. The pain may be described as intermittent, constant, abdominal, radiating to the back, mild to severe depending on the underlying cause. A brief review of the gallbladder anatomy and function may help readers better understand gallbladder pain. The gallbladder is connected to the liver via ducts that supply bile to the gallbladder for storage. These bile ducts then form the common hepatic duct that joins with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct that empties into the GI tract (duodenum). In addition, the pancreatic duct usually merges with the common bile duct just before it enters the duodenum. Hormones trigger the gallbladder to release bile when fat and amino acids reach the duodenum after eating a meal (see illustration below), which facilitates the digestion of these foods. Statistics suggest that women may have up to twice the incidence of gallstones than men. As stated previously, the major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. There are two major causes of pain that either originate from the gallbladder or involve the gallbladder directly. They are due to 1) intermittent or complete blockage of any of the ducts by gallstones; or 2) gallstone sludge and/or inflammation that may accompany irritation or infection of the surrounding tissues, when partial or complete obstruction of ducts causes pressure and ischemia (inadequate blood supply due to a blockage of blood vessels in the area) to develop in the adjacent tissues.
17 Aug 2017
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The pain of gallbladder disease almost always has one of two causes - gallstones or cholecystitis. Gallstones are stones that form in the gallbladder (often misspelled "gall bladder"). They vary in size from a millimeter or two to several centimeters and are made up of cholesterol or bile pigments. Cholecystitis means inflammation of the gallbladder. Although, cholecystitis is most commonly caused by gallstones, there are other less common causes as well. What is the mechanism of gallbladder pain? Gallstones have a tendency to become lodged in the bile ducts leading from the gallbladder or liver into the intestines. When gallstones lodge in the ducts, they give rise to a specific type of pain called biliary colic. The characteristics of biliary colic are very consistent, and it is important to recognize its characteristics because they direct the physician to the most appropriate test to diagnose gallstones, primarily abdominal ultrasonography. In approximately 5% of cases, ultrasonography will fail to show gallstones. In such situations, if the characteristics of biliary colic are typical, physicians will go on to other more advanced tests for diagnosing gallstones, specifically endoscopic ultrasound. Finally, most gallstones do not cause pain, and are frequently found incidentally during abdominal ultrasonography. If the symptoms for which the ultrasonography is being done are not typical of biliary colic, it is unlikely that the symptoms are caused by gallstones. The gallstones can be truly silent. This is important to recognize because surgery to remove the gallstones is unlikely to relieve the symptoms. When gallstones lodge suddenly in the duct leading from the gallbladder (cystic duct), the duct leading from the liver to the cystic duct (common hepatic duct), or the duct leading from the cystic duct to the intestine (common bile duct), the normal flow of bile from the liver is interrupted.
21 Aug 2017
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Gallstones and cholecystitis are treatable conditions. Gallstones that do not cause symptoms don't need immediate treatment other than an alert for potential future gallbladder problems. However, gallstones that cause symptoms or infections of the gallbladder do need treatment. Treatment options include surgically removing the gallbladder, medications to break up gallstones, and antibiotics to treat infections. According to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), gallbladder removal surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgeries. Laparoscopic gallbladder removal (keyhole surgery) is most common. In this procedure, a surgeon inserts a thin tube with a tiny video camera attached into a small incision in the abdomen. The camera transmits images from inside the body to a video monitor. While watching the enlarged images on the monitor, the surgeon carefully removes the gallbladder through one of the small incisions. Most gallbladder removals are performed this way. These surgeries are often outpatient procedures, meaning that the patient can often go home the same day. A much smaller number of gallbladder patients need open surgery. During open surgery, a surgeon removes the gallbladder through a 4-6-inch-long incision in the abdomen. These surgeries often happen when the gallbladder is too inflamed or infected to remove laparoscopically or if a problem occurs during a laparoscopic procedure. This is not an outpatient procedure and may require a hospital stay of up to 1 week afterward. If a person is too ill to tolerate surgery, the gallbladder can be drained with a tube inserted through the skin directly into the gallbladder.
7 Sep 2017
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While gallbladder problems can't be entirely prevented, patients can take steps to decrease the risks of developing gallstones or other infections. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) state that the following people have an increased risk of gallstones: Women People over 40 People with a family history of gallstones Native and Mexican Americans Obese individuals If a person falls into a category that increases the risk of gallstones, they should avoid the following to reduce their risk: Rapid weight loss Diets high in calories but low in fiber Excess weight gain Outlook Gallbladder problems are generally easily resolved. Long-term complications are unlikely after removing the gallbladder or treating the infection. Those without a gallbladder can lead a normal, healthy life after recovery.
9 Sep 2017
121
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The condition of fatty liver is often associated with gallbladder disease such as gallbladder inflammation or gallstones. Gallbladder problems can be helped and often completely resolved. There is no need to panic and rush into surgery for gallbladder disease, unless you are in severe acute pain or your doctor suspects that you have gallbladder cancer. Indeed having your gallbladder surgically removed may not relieve your abdominal pain. According to a study published in The British Journal of General Practice 2004;54:574-79, it was found that having the gallbladder surgically removed (cholecystectomy) does not always relieve upper abdominal pain even in those with proven gall stones. After cholecystectomy, one third of the patients saw their doctor again with the same pain they had suffered prior to the surgery. What a disappointing result for these patients. After 12 months most of the patients who had a cholecystectomy were pain free, but so were 63% of the patients who had kept their gallstones. In this study 45% of the patients with “biliary pain” did not have gallstones. Gallstones are very common but they are not always the cause of the patient’s pain. So if you have upper abdominal pain and proven gallstones, do not assume the pain is caused by the gallstones. It is important to get your doctor to exclude other causes of upper abdominal pain such as stomach ulcers, acid reflux, spasm and pancreatic disorders etc. These can be treated effectively so that it is often possible to avoid gallbladder surgery. Gallbladder problems can cause symptoms that include: Nausea and vomiting Indigestion Intolerance to fatty foods Abdominal bloating Pain in the right upper and central upper abdomen Referred pain may radiate to the back and the right shoulder Acute Gallbladder Emergencies If the gallbladder or large bile ducts become infected or obstructed with sludge or gallstones, very severe acute symptoms may supervene and these include –
10 Sep 2017
301
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The gallbladder isn't an organ that gets a lot of attention — unless it's causing you pain. The gallbladder is a little sac that stores bile from the liver, and it's found just beneath your liver. The gallbladder releases bile, via the cystic duct, into the small intestine to help break down the foods you eat — particularly fatty foods. Typically the gallbladder doesn't cause too many problems or much concern, but if something slows or blocks the flow of bile from the gallbladder, a number of problems can result. What Can Go Wrong Some common gallbladder problems include: Gallstones (cholelithiasis) This is the condition when small stones, or sometimes larger ones, develop inside the gallbladder. Gallstones may cause pain known as biliary colic (see below), but about 90 percent of people with gallstones will have no symptoms. Most symptomatic gallstones have been present for a number of years. For unknown reasons, if you have gallstones for more than 10 years, they are less likely to cause symptoms. Biliary colic This is the term often used for the severe episodes of pain that can be caused by gallstone blockage of the cystic duct. The gallbladder contracts vigorously against the blockage, causing spasmodic (or sometimes constant) severe pain.
12 Sep 2017
277
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Gallstones and cholecystitis are treatable conditions. Gallstones that do not cause symptoms don't need immediate treatment other than an alert for potential future gallbladder problems. However, gallstones that cause symptoms or infections of the gallbladder do need treatment. Treatment options include surgically removing the gallbladder, medications to break up gallstones, and antibiotics to treat infections. According to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), gallbladder removal surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgeries. Laparoscopic gallbladder removal (keyhole surgery) is most common. In this procedure, a surgeon inserts a thin tube with a tiny video camera attached into a small incision in the abdomen. The camera transmits images from inside the body to a video monitor. While watching the enlarged images on the monitor, the surgeon carefully removes the gallbladder through one of the small incisions. Most gallbladder removals are performed this way. These surgeries are often outpatient procedures, meaning that the patient can often go home the same day.
20 Sep 2017
152
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The gallbladder is a 4-inch, pear-shaped organ located under your liver in the upper right part of your abdomen. It plays a part in digesting the food you eat. Its primary function is to store bile (a combination of fluids, fat and cholesterol) that helps break down fat from food in your intestine. The gallbladder transfers the bile into the small intestine through the bile ducts. From here, fat-soluble vitamins and nutrients get absorbed into the bloodstream. However, several types of conditions affect the gallbladder. These conditions include gallstones, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder), biliary colic, and dysfunctional gallbladder. Anyone can suffer from gallbladder problems. A few major risk factors include genetics, obesity and gender, with women being more prone to such problems than men. These problems can be a minor nuisance or develop into a major medical condition. Different types of gallbladder problems have different sets of symptoms. Some signs and symptoms of trouble include pain in the upper abdominal area, pain beneath the right shoulder blade or toward the back, pain usually after eating a meal high in fat content, chest pain, heartburn, indigestion, and excessive gas and bloating.
23 Sep 2017
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Doctors use several different surgical procedures to help treat your gallbladder disease. If you're having gallbladder symptoms caused by gallstones or other conditions, your doctor may recommend a surgical procedure as part of your treatment. But there's no such thing as a one-size-fits-all gallbladder surgery. Here are some gallbladder surgery options that your doctor might discuss with you. Cholecystectomy This is the medical term for a surgery to completely remove the gallbladder. Remarkably, your body doesn't need a gallbladder to digest food. In the United States, cholecystectomy is a very common operation. If possible, most surgeons will opt for the laparoscopic form of this gallbladder surgery, in which the gallbladder is removed through a small incision in the abdomen. "[Laparoscopy] is a 'Band-Aid' surgery, and the recovery is much easier," says Harold Berenzweig, MD, a gastroenterologist and the executive vice president at Texas Health Harris Methodist in Fort Worth, Texas. Some patients can go home the same day, Dr. Berenzweig adds. Others may spend one night in the hospital.
26 Sep 2017
253
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Gallbladder cancer is uncommon, but when it does strike, it's often diagnosed at a late stage. Gallbladder cancer is rare. The American Cancer Society estimates that 11,740 new cases will be diagnosed in 2017 (5,320 in men and 6,420 in women). In comparison, overall new cancer diagnoses are expected to hit 1,688,780 in the United States in 2017. Of those people diagnosed with gallbladder cancer, more than 3,800 will die from the disease (1,630 men and 2,200 women). Gallbladder cancer is the most common type of cancer found in the bile tract, and is more common in women and people older than 60. Risk Factors Gallbladder cancer doesn't affect a huge number of Americans each year, but it's a particularly troubling disease. Most of the time, it's diagnosed at a late stage — making treatment difficult. Only about one in five cases of gallbladder cancer is diagnosed early, before the cancer spreads beyond the gallbladder. Some of the most common risk factors for gallbladder cancer are: Gallstones Gallbladder polyps Being overweight or obese Being of Native American or Mexican American descent Being older than 65 Being female A condition called porcelain gallbladder, in which the gallbladder wall hardens with deposits of calcium Having had typhoid (very rare in the United States) Choledochal cysts — sacs of bile that form on the common bile duct An abnormality of the bile ducts A family history of gallbladder cancer Gallstones are the biggest indicator of a person's likelihood of developing gallbladder cancer, but the relationship can be tricky to understand.
27 Sep 2017
239
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After gallbladder surgery, digestion can be tricky for a while. Here's what to avoid. When you have a problem with your gallbladder, like gallstones, your doctor may recommend that you have surgery to remove your gallbladder. Your gallbladder is an organ that you can live without, but some people need to avoid certain foods after gallbladder removal. The Gallbladder and Digestion The gallbladder is a small organ that sits under your liver. It stores, concentrates, and helps secrete bile, a liquid made by your liver that helps digest fatty foods. If you need to have surgery to remove your gallbladder, your liver still makes enough bile for normal digestion. Even so, it is not unusual for people to have some difficulty digesting certain foods in the days and weeks following gallbladder surgery, also called a cholecystectomy. Dietary Adjustments It's important to carefully follow your doctor's instructions about your diet after gallbladder surgery. If you're hospitalized, your medical team will help you transition from a liquid to a solid diet almost immediately after your gallbladder surgery. If you're recovering at home, you'll need to introduce foods slowly and consume mainly clear liquids, like broth and gelatin, at first. If you feel ready and are not nauseated, you can slowly begin introducing solid foods back into your diet as you start feeling better. But you may need to avoid certain types of foods for a while. More than half of people who have recently had gallbladder surgery report problems with digesting fats following their surgery. This is because your gallbladder is no longer there to control the release of bile into your intestines after you eat a meal. Instead, a small amount of bile is now directly "leaked" from your liver into your small intestine at a slow, constant rate. It can take a few weeks for your body to get used to this change, and you may experience bloating, diarrhea, and gas after eating fatty foods during this time.
4 Oct 2017
282
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Sometimes news of an alternative remedy will spread rapidly through websites and other media. But just because you are reading about it everywhere does not mean that a remedy is effective or even safe. One such alternative gallbladder treatment is the so-called gallbladder cleanse. There are many different recipes for this so-called "cleanse," but most involve drinking large amounts of citrus juices, Epsom salts, and olive oil. The advertised promises sound enticing, especially if you're facing the cost and hassle of a cholecystectomy. But there are no gallbladder flushes or cleanses that have been proven to break up or eliminate gallstones, says Sanjay Jagannath, MD, a gastroenterologist at RMG Gastroenterology Group in Clayton, North Carolina. "There's not any good evidence to suggest there's anything out there to reliably do that," Dr. Jagannath says. One popular homemade gallbladder cleanse recipe prescribes a combination of apple juice, lemon juice, and olive oil to eliminate gallstones. Others suggest using a Chinese herb called gold coin grass. Jagannath says people who ingest these remedies often have subsequent bowel movements that include small round objects thought to be gallstones. However, he adds, the objects are actually the result of the olive oil mixing with bile, the fluid in the gallbladder that digests fat.
8 Oct 2017
338
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I have personally supervised more than 200 people in clinical practice who have been through the gall bladder flush described below. I have never encountered problems more than the occassional nausea, assuming that the protocol is followed as mentioned below. HUNDREDS OF STONES It is estimated that 20% of the world’s population will develop gallstones in the gall bladder at some stage in their lives. This figure does not take account of the numerous stones that accumulate in the liver and its ducts, given that the liver produces them in the first place, and then travel down to the gall bladder. I have personally witnessed the removal of gallstones from hundreds of patients – some of them had gall-bladder symptoms but had no positive results from an ultra sound scan. Most, however, did not have any symptoms at all, yet would flush out literally hundreds of stones – no exaggeration! One woman in her 50’s had three scans and the radiologists found nothing. She had pains in the gall-bladder region for 20 years. When she did the gall bladder flush she removed 430 stones the first time around, and about 300 the second time! About a week before I did my first gall bladder flush I went to see a friend who is an ultrasound specialist. He checked my gall bladder and found it as clean as a whistle. When I flushed a week later I removed 5 LARGE stones (about the size of a hazelnut), and about 150 smaller stones, including gravel. It is believed by many naturopathic doctors that EVERYONE has gallstones, some less than others, and I have validated this many times in clinical practice. The cleanse that I recommend below takes place within a period of less than 14 hours and can be done at home over the weekend. It is a painless and harmless natural way of removing stones, without requiring invasive procedures such as surgery, laser, etc.
10 Oct 2017
408
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If you are diagnosed with acute cholecystitis, you will probably need to be admitted to hospital for treatment. Initial treatment Initial treatment will usually involve: fasting (not eating or drinking) to take the strain off your gallbladder receiving fluids through a drip directly into a vein (intravenously) to prevent dehydration taking medication to relieve your pain If you have a suspected infection, you will also be given antibiotics. These often need to be continued for up to a week, during which time you may need to stay in hospital or you may be able to go home. With this initial treatment, any gallstones that may have caused the condition usually fall back into the gallbladder and the inflammation often settles down. Surgery In order to prevent acute cholecystitis recurring, and reduce your risk of developing potentially serious complications, the removal of your gallbladder will often be recommended at some point after the initial treatment. This type of surgery is known as a cholecystectomy. Although uncommon, an alternative procedure called a percutaneous cholecystostomy may be carried out if you are too unwell to have surgery. This is where a needle is inserted through your abdomen to drain away the fluid that has built up in the gallbladder. If you are fit enough to have surgery, your doctors will need to decide when the best time to remove your gallbladder may be. In some cases, you may need to have surgery immediately or in the next day or 2, while in other cases you may be advised to wait for the inflammation to fully resolve over the next few weeks.
16 Nov 2017
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