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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A doctor will check for signs and ask the patient about symptoms. The following tests may also be ordered: Blood test - a blood test may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease. Urine test - a urine test helps find out whether there is either blood or protein in the urine. Kidney scans - kidney scans may include a magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan, computed tomography CT scan, or an ultrasound scan. The aim is to determine whether there are any blockages in the urine flow. These scans can also reveal the size and shape of the kidneys - in advanced stages of kidney disease the kidneys are smaller and have an uneven shape. Kidney biopsy - a small sample of kidney tissue is extracted and examined for cell damage. An analysis of kidney tissue makes it easier to make a precise diagnosis of kidney disease. Chest X-ray - the aim here is to check for pulmonary edema fluid retained in the lungs. Glomerular filtration rate GFR - GFR is a test that measures the glomerular filtration rate - it compares the levels of waste products in the patient's blood and urine. GFR measures how many milliliters of waste the kidneys can filter per minute. The kidneys of healthy individuals can typically filter over 90 ml per minute. Changes in the GFR rate can assess how advanced the kidney disease is. In the UK, and many other countries, kidney disease stages are classified as follows: Stage 1 - GFR rate is normal. However, evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 2 - GFR rate is lower than 90 milliliters, and evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 3 - GFR rate is lower than 60 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 4 - GRF rate is lower than 30 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease
25 Apr 2017
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21:48
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The following conditions or situations are linked to a higher risk of developing kidney disease: a family history of kidney disease age - chronic kidney disease is much more common among people over 60 atherosclerosis bladder obstruction chronic glomerulonephritis congenital kidney disease kidney disease which is present at birth diabetes - one of the most common risk factors hypertension lupus erythematosis overexposure to some toxins sickle cell disease some medications Complications of chronic kidney disease If the chronic kidney disease progresses to kidney failure, the following complications are possible: anemia central nervous system damage dry skin - or skin color changes fluid retention hyperkalemia - blood potassium levels rise, which can result in heart damage insomnia lower sex drive male erectile dysfunction ostemalacia - bones become weak and break easily pecarditis - the sac-like membrane that envelops the heart (pericardium) becomes inflamed stomach ulcers weak immune system
28 Apr 2017
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21:48
Your kidneys filter extra water and wastes out of your blood and make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure so that your body can stay healthy. Read more about what your kidneys do. Kidney disease means that the kidneys are damaged and can't filter blood like they should. This damage can cause wastes to build up in the body. It can also cause other problems that can harm your health. For most people, kidney damage occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. This is called chronic kidney disease. When someone has a sudden change in kidney function—because of illness, or injury, or have taken certain medications—this is called acute kidney injury. This can occur in a person with normal kidneys or in someone who already has kidney problems. Kidney disease is a growing problem. More than 20 million Americans may have kidney disease and many more are at risk. Anyone can develop kidney disease, regardless of age or race. The main risk factors for developing kidney disease are: Diabetes, High blood pressure, Cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) disease, and A family history of kidney failure. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys over many years.
7 Jun 2017
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Most CKD in the U.S. has one of two causes: type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure—or both at the same time. These two health problems cause 70% of all kidney failure in the United States. They also cause heart disease and strokes. So, keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure in check can help your whole body. Your kidneys may be small, but they perform many vital functions that help maintain your overall health, including filtering waste and excess fluids from your blood. Serious kidney disease may lead to complete kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatments or a kidney transplant to stay alive. While effective treatments are available for many kidney diseases, people are sometimes unaware that kidney disease can often be prevented. The following are the ten major causes of kidney disease. In the United States the two leading causes of kidney failure, also called end stage kidney disease or ESRD, are diabetes (also called Type 2, or adult onset diabetes) and high blood pressure. When these two diseases are controlled by treatment, the associated kidney disease can often be prevented or slowed down. Many effective drugs are available to treat high blood pressure. In addition, healthy lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and regular exercise, often help to control, and may even help to prevent, high blood pressure. Careful control of blood sugar in diabetics helps to prevent such complications as kidney disease, coronary heart disease and stroke. When diabetics have associated high blood pressure, special drugs called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may help to protect their kidney function.
8 Jun 2017
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When you know the symptoms of chronic kidney disease (CKD), you can get treatment and feel your best. CKD symptoms can be subtle. Some people don’t have any symptoms — or don’t think they do. If you have one or more of the 15 symptoms below, or worry about kidney problems, see a doctor for blood and urine tests. Many of the symptoms on this list can be caused by other health problems. The only way to know the cause of YOUR symptoms is to see your doctor. Fatigue – being tired all of the time Why this happens: Healthy kidneys make a hormone called erythropoietin (a-rith'- ro-po'- uh-tin), or EPO, that tells your body to make oxygen-carrying red blood cells. As the kidneys fail, they make less EPO. With fewer red blood cells to carry oxygen, your muscles and brain tire very quickly. This is anemia, and it can be treated. Feeling cold – when others are warm Why this happens: Anemia can make you feel cold all the time, even in a warm room. Shortness of breath – after very little effort Why this happens: Being short of breath can be related to the kidneys in two ways. First, extra fluid in the body can build up in the lungs. And second, anemia (a shortage of oxygen-carrying red blood cells) can leave your body oxygen-starved and short of breath.
9 Jun 2017
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Mohammed Abdallah Baba Fofo Nana Reema
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* medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease that cause damage to the small blood vessels within the kidneys * hereditary kidney disease such as polycystic kidney disease or Alport's syndrome * glomerulonephritis (inflammation and damage of the filtering components of the kidney) that is inherited or caused by other medical problems (e.g., lupus, diabetes, amyloidosis) * reflux nephropathy, a condition where urine flows from the bladder back to the kidneys, causing damage to the kidneys * blockage of the urinary tract as a result of birth defects, prostate problems, kidney stones, or tumours * medications that can cause permanent damage to the kidneys (e.g., acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, cisplatin, lithium)
17 Jun 2017
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The following conditions or situations are linked to a higher risk of developing kidney disease: a family history of kidney disease age - chronic kidney disease is much more common among people over 60 atherosclerosis bladder obstruction chronic glomerulonephritis congenital kidney disease kidney disease which is present at birth diabetes - one of the most common risk factors hypertension lupus erythematosis overexposure to some toxins sickle cell disease some medications Complications of chronic kidney disease If the chronic kidney disease progresses to kidney failure, the following complications are possible: anemia central nervous system damage dry skin - or skin color changes fluid retention hyperkalemia - blood potassium levels rise, which can result in heart damage insomnia
19 Jun 2017
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You are more likely to develop kidney disease if you have diabetes high blood pressure heart disease a family history of kidney failure What can I do to keep my kidneys healthy? You can protect your kidneys by preventing or managing health conditions that cause kidney damage, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. The steps described below may help keep your whole body healthy, including your kidneys. During your next medical visit, you may want to ask your health care provider about your kidney health. Early kidney disease may not have any symptoms, so getting tested may be the only way to know your kidneys are healthy. Your health care provider will help decide how often you should be tested. See a provider right away if you develop a urinary tract infection (UTI), which can cause kidney damage if left untreated. Make healthy food choices Choose foods that are healthy for your heart and your entire body: fresh fruits, fresh or frozen vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products. Eat healthy meals, and cut back on salt and added sugars. Aim for less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day. Try to have less than 10 percent of your daily calories come from added sugars. Tips for making healthy food choices Cook with a mix of spices instead of salt. Choose veggie toppings such as spinach, broccoli, and peppers for your pizza. Try baking or broiling meat, chicken, and fish instead of frying. Serve foods without gravy or added fats. Try to choose foods with little or no added sugar.
23 Jun 2017
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With chronic kidney disease, the kidneys don’t usually fail all at once. Instead, kidney disease often progresses slowly over a period of years. This is good news because if CKD is caught early, medicines and lifestyle changes may help slow its progress and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible. Five stages of chronic kidney disease To help improve the quality of care for people with kidney disease, the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) created a guideline to help doctors identify each level of kidney disease. The NKF divided kidney disease into five stages. When the doctor knows what stage of kidney disease a person has they can provide the best care, as each stage calls for different tests and treatments. If you have stage 4 kidney disease, it is important for you to: Learn what you can do to keep kidney disease from getting worse - and do it! Do your part to manage the complications of kidney disease Heart and blood vessel problems Anemia (low red blood cell count) Bone problems High blood pressure
26 Jun 2017
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Kidney disease often goes undetected in the general population, but children and adolescents are at an even greater risk due to the nature of the causes of the diseases and the ambiguity of the symptoms. In adults, 90% of cases are related to glomerular based renal disease caused by diabetes, hypertension and glomerulonephritis, which cues physicians to suspect kidney disease. In children, 70% of CKD is associated with tubulointerstitial disease and lack the obvious symptoms such as hematuria (red blood cells in the urine), hypertension (high blood pressure) or edema (swelling). (1) Adding to this difficulty, children might not be aware of some of the changes that are impacting their body and will not always let their parents know of potential issues. Common symptoms for children are: Swelling (even mild) of the hands and feet and/or puffiness around the eyes caused by excess fluid build-up, to the point where the child’s ability to move around normally is compromised After initial swelling, socks or a belt can leave an indentation in the skin that will persist Lack of or decrease in appetite. In children with ESRD it is especially important to keep their appetite up because transplant eligibility is based partially on growth.
28 Jun 2017
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Kidney failure can be caused by many underlying issues and generally falls into two categories of disease, classified as acute or chronic. Acute diseases generally develop quickly, lasts for a limited amount of time and are more immediately severe than chronic conditions (think food poisoning). However, acute disease can also develop or cause lingering problems. Chronic diseases generally develop and worsen over time and do not go away. In adults the most common causes of kidney failure are diabetes and hypertension. In children congenital defects causing urinary tract blockages (posterior urethral valves) or small or non-functioning kidneys (hypoplastic and dysplastic) or another disorder that causes scarring of the glomeruli that leads to nephrotic syndrome (Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis), are the most common causes. (1) Until age 4, birth defects and hereditary diseases are by far the leading causes of kidney failure. Between ages 5 and 14, hereditary diseases continue to be the most common causes, but glomerular disease incidence rises. As children age past 15, glomerular diseases are the leading cause, and hereditary diseases become rarer. Acute Diseases Acute kidney disease can come from poisoning, but often comes from an injury. Injuries that result in blood loss may temporarily reduce kidney function; however once blood loss is limited, the kidneys usually recover. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) - is rare disease that affects children mostly under 10 years of age and can result in kidney failure. HUS is caused by eating foods contaminated by Escherichia coli (E coli) bacteria, which leads to an infection in the digestive system. Poisons produced by the bacteria can damage the kidneys, causing acute kidney failure. Children with HUS may need blood transfusion or dialysis for a short time. Most however, return to normal after a few weeks, and only a small percentage of children (mostly those who have severe acute kidney disease) will develop
2 Jul 2017
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Children with kidney failure have a few options to choose from, depending on the severity of their disease. The primary goal is to have a successful transplant, however viable kidneys are not always available and some children are not strong candidates for transplants. In some cases a nephrectomy is a solution that can make childhood disease easier to manage. In most cases parents choose home dialysis options either home hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Transplants In adults, most transplanted kidneys come from donors who have just perished. However, about half of the kidney transplants in children come from a living donor, usually a parent or other close family member. Those who do not have a relative able to donate a live kidney need to enter the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) managed Organ Procurement and Transplantation Waiting List. (1) Candidates' ages and length of time on the waiting list are factors in the donor point system. Children aged 18 and under get extra points compared with adults, because they are likely to receive the greatest benefit from a donated kidney. (2) Living Donor Kidney - A kidney from a living donor often has advantages over a kidney from a recently deceased individual. (3) ​A kidney from a parent is guaranteed to match on at least three of six proteins, which means it is less likely to be rejected. With a living donation, there is additional time to pre plan and schedule the operation. Shortens the number on the waiting list. Psychological benefits of knowing that the donation came from a caring family member.
3 Jul 2017
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