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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Fatty liver disease occurs when the liver has trouble breaking down fats, causing fat to build up in the liver tissue. Some root causes of this disease include: Medications Viral hepatitis Autoimmune or inherited liver disease Fast weight loss Malnutrition There are a number of risk factors that increase your chances of having NAFLD; they include: Obesity Gastric bypass surgery High cholesterol High levels of triglycerides in the blood Type 2 diabetes Metabolic syndrome Sleep apnea Polycystic ovary syndrome Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) Underactive pituitary gland (hypopituitarism) According to a study conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, obesity is associated with an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A major feature of NAFLD, called steatosis, occurs when the rate of hepatic fatty acid uptake from plasma and fatty acid synthesis is greater than the rate of fatty acid oxidation and export. This metabolic imbalance is a significant factor responsible for the formation of NAFLD. A 2006 review published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology states that NAFLD is extremely common among patients undergoing bariatric surgery, ranging from 84 percent to 96 percent. The review also noted that the disease seems to be most common among men, and it increases with older age and after menopause in women.
28 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Cholecystitis is a swelling and irritation of your gallbladder, a small organ in the right side of your belly near your liver. The gallbladder’s job is to hold a digestive juice called bile. It releases bile into your small intestine when your body needs it to break down fats. But if the path to your small intestine is blocked, bile gets trapped. That backup can irritate your gallbladder. That’s how cholecystitis happens. Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms. They often show up after you’ve eaten a big or especially fatty meal. It’s easy to mistake it for other health problems, but another telltale sign is intense pain – in your belly, in your back or under your right shoulder blade. If you don’t see a doctor and get treatment, it can lead to dangerous infections or become a long-term condition. The most common solution is surgery to remove your gallbladder. In most cases, gallstones blocking the tube leading out of your gallbladder cause cholecystitis. If left untreated, cholecystitis can lead to serious, sometimes life-threatening complications, such as a gallbladder rupture. Treatment for cholecystitis often involves gallbladder removal. The exact number of cases in the UK is not known. However, it is not an uncommon condition and it is quite a common cause for hospital admission. Women are affected more often than men.
29 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The most common symptom of cholecystitis is pain in your upper right abdomen that can sometimes move around to your back or right shoulder blade. Other symptoms include: * Nausea or vomiting. * Tenderness in the right abdomen. * Fever. * Pain that gets worse during a deep breath. * Pain for more than 6 hours, particularly after meals. * Pain in the upper tummy (abdomen) - the main symptom. It is usually worse on the right side under the ribs. The pain may radiate (travel) to the back or to the right shoulder. The pain tends to be worse if you breathe in deeply. Older people may not have fever or pain. Their only symptom may be a tender area in the abdomen. When to see a doctor Make an appointment with your doctor if you have worrisome signs or symptoms. For abdominal pain so severe you can't sit still or get comfortable, have someone drive you to the emergency room.
31 Mar 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The last few months of 2011 were indeed the season to be jolly! We were jolly all right. For Americans, It started with Thanksgiving and all the trimmings that go with it, then we had the leftovers. We just barely recovered from Thanksgiving when the rest of the holiday celebrations got under way. It seems like all these meals just never seemed to digest and then the next feast is laid in front of us and that feeling of being uncomfortably full seemed to last forever. Throw in traveling during the holidays, which upsets our internal clocks and then the stress of it all adds to the digestion anxiety. Exposure to a different holiday diet, perhaps in a different locale or country, usually leads to eating something we shouldn’t and this stress is compounded by knowing that while we feast there are all too many people the world over who have no food at all and so we eat what is put in front of us without being entirely conscious of its consequences in our bodies. Every year most of us make New Years resolutions to never do this type of eating again but temptations are always all around us and for some of us our willpower just goes out the window when the stress in our lives mounts up again and comfort foods beckon! In order to have some real questions to ask ourselves after we have indulged, it is important to review some symptoms. And because I have so much to share with you all on this subject matter, for everyone’s convenience, I am going to break this Celestial Musing blog up into two parts. (Stay tuned for Part Two: Best & Worst Foods for Gallbladder Disease) In Part One, I am going to ask you some serious questions to help you determine if that case of acute indigestion was indeed a dreaded gallbladder attack and also review what the gallbladder actually is. What is the gallbladder? The gallbladder is a small pear-shaped muscular sack that acts as a storage tank for bile. The bile is made in the liver by liver
1 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Gallbladder pain is (often misspelled "gall bladder") an all-inclusive term used to describe any pain due to disease related to the gallbladder. The major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. Symptoms vary and may be triggered by eating certain foods. The pain may be described as intermittent, constant, abdominal, radiating to the back, mild to severe depending on the underlying cause. A brief review of the gallbladder anatomy and function may help readers better understand gallbladder pain. The gallbladder is connected to the liver via ducts that supply bile to the gallbladder for storage. These bile ducts then form the common hepatic duct that joins with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct that empties into the GI tract (duodenum). In addition, the pancreatic duct usually merges with the common bile duct just before it enters the duodenum. Hormones trigger the gallbladder to release bile when fat and amino acids reach the duodenum after eating a meal, which facilitates the digestion of these foods. Statistics suggest that women may have up to twice the incidence of gallstones than men. As stated previously, the major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis, and ascending cholangitis. There are two major causes of pain that either originate from the gallbladder or involve the gallbladder directly. They are due to 1) intermittent or complete blockage of any of the ducts by gallstones; or 2) gallstone sludge and/or inflammation that may accompany irritation or infection of the surrounding tissues, when partial or complete obstruction of ducts causes pressure and ischemia (inadequate blood supply due to a blockage of blood vessels in the area) to develop in the adjacent tissues.
3 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Liver disease is any disturbance of liver function that causes illness. The liver is responsible for many critical functions within the body and should it become diseased or injured, the loss of those functions can cause significant damage to the body. Liver disease is also referred to as hepatic disease. Liver disease is a broad term that covers all the potential problems that cause the liver to fail to perform its designated functions. Usually, more than 75% or three quarters of liver tissue needs to be affected before a decrease in function occurs. The liver is the largest solid organ in the body; and is also considered a gland because among its many functions, it makes and secretes bile. The liver is located in the upper right portion of the abdomen protected by the rib cage. It has two main lobes that are made up of tiny lobules. The liver cells have two different sources of blood supply. The hepatic artery supplies oxygen rich blood that is pumped from the heart, while the portal vein supplies nutrients from the intestine and the spleen. Normally, veins return blood from the body to the heart, but the portal vein allows nutrients and chemicals from the digestive tract to enter the liver for processing and filtering prior to entering the general circulation. The portal vein also efficiently delivers the chemicals and proteins that liver cells need to produce the proteins, cholesterol, and glycogen required for normal body activities. As part of its function, the liver makes bile, a fluid that contains among other substances, water, chemicals, and bile acids (made from stored cholesterol in the liver). Bile is stored in the gallbladder and when food enters the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine), bile is secreted into the duodenum, to aid in the digestion of food. The liver is the only organ in the body that can easily replace damaged cells, but if enough cells are lost, the liver may not
9 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 If you have no gallbladder pain even if you have gallstones but never had pain), you need no treatment. Some patients who have had one or two attacks may elect to avoid treatment. Pain during an acute attack is often treated with morphine. Medical treatments include * oral bile salt therapy 50% effective, * ursodiol Actigall, for example * dissolution, and * lithotripsy shock waves. The definitive treatment is to remove the gallbladder and or the obstructing gallstones by surgery. Currently, the surgical method of choice is laparoscopic surgery, where the gallbladder is removed by instruments using only small incisions in the abdomen. However, some patients may require more extensive surgery. Usually, people do well once the gallbladder is removed unless there is an underlying cause that mimics gallbladder pain for example, biliary dyskinesia, a motility disorder of sphincter of Oddi. Women who are pregnant are treated like women who are not pregnant, although pregnant women more commonly have cholesterol gallstone development than non-pregnant women. Although supportive care is tried in women who are pregnant, acute cholecystitis is the second most common surgical emergency in pregnancy appendicitis is the first.
11 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 If you are experiencing frequent gallbladder pain, you likely need to make some dietary changes to avoid future attacks. Fatty meals, heavy meals, fried food, fast foods are best avoided. Many find that dairy products, pork products, chocolate, and a host of other foods can trigger an attack. You also may have some quirky triggers that you will need to figure out on your own. A food diary can help with this. Sometimes the results will surprise you. While some find lettuce to help a gallbladder attack, others find it will cause one! You may wish to consider a gallbladder flush to cleanse your gallbladder of stones and sludge. The herb chanca piedra, also known as stone breaker, can be taken over time to help dissolve gallstones. Apple cider vinegar is another common tonic that is taken daily to prevent gallbladder problems. (1 Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar in a glass of water or juice once or twice a day.) Scroll down to to read many stories with natural solutions for gallbladder pain.
12 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Most cases of gallstones don't cause any symptoms. But if a gallstone blocks one of the bile ducts, it can cause sudden, severe abdominal pain, known as biliary colic. Other symptoms may develop if the blockage is more severe or develops in another part of the digestive system. Abdominal pain biliary colic Gallstones can cause sudden, severe abdominal pain that usually lasts one to five hours although it can sometimes last just a few minutes. The pain can be felt: in the centre of your abdomen tummy just under the ribs on your right-handside – it may spread from here to your side or shoulder blade The pain is constant and isn't relieved when you go to the toilet, pass wind or are sick. It's sometimes triggered by eating fatty foods, but may occur at any time of day and it may wake you up during the night. Biliary colic doesn't happen often. After an episode of pain, it may be several weeks or months before you experience another episode. Some people also have periods where they sweat excessively and feel sick or vomit. When gallstones cause episodes of biliary colic, it is known as 'uncomplicated gallstone disease'.
13 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the two kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through two thin tubes of muscle called ureters, one on each side of the bladder. The bladder stores urine. The muscles of the bladder wall remain relaxed while the bladder fills with urine. As the bladder fills to capacity, signals sent to the brain tell a person to find a toilet soon. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. In men the urethra is long, while in women it is short. Why are the kidneys important? The kidneys are important because they keep the composition, or makeup, of the blood stable, which lets the body function. They prevent the buildup of wastes and extra fluid in the body keep levels of electrolytes stable, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate make hormones that help regulate blood pressure make red blood cells bones stay strong How do the kidneys work? The kidney is not one large filter. Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine.
15 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Your kidneys aren’t very big each is about the size of your fist but they do important work. They keep you healthy by maintaining just the right balance of water and other substances inside your body. Unfortunately, if your kidneys start to malfunction, you might not realize it for a long while. Kidney disease usually doesn’t make you feel sick until the problem becomes serious and irreversible. March is National Kidney Month, a perfect time to learn more about how to keep your kidneys healthy and how to catch problems early. Your kidneys are 2 reddish, bean-shaped organs located on either side of your spine in the middle of your back. Their main job is to filter your blood. Each kidney contains about a million tiny filters that can process around 40 gallons of fluid every day about enough to fill a house’s hot water heater. When blood passes through the kidney, the filters sift and hold onto the substances your body might need, such as certain nutrients and much of the water. Harmful wastes and extra water and nutrients are routed to the nearby bladder and flushed away as urine. Your kidneys also produce several hormones. These hormones help to control your blood pressure, make red blood cells and activate vitamin D, which keeps your bones strong. We all lose a little of our kidney function as we get older. People can even survive with just one kidney if they donate the other to a friend or family member. But when kidney function drops because of an underlying kidney disease, it’s something to be concerned about. Toxins and extra water can build up in your blood. Falling hormone production can cause other problems. About 1 in 10 adults nationwide, or about 20 million people, have at least some signs of kidney damage. There are different types of kidney disease. Most strike both kidneys at the same time, harming the tiny filters called nephrons and reducing their filtering ability. When damage to nephrons
16 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes. High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when the pressure of your blood against the walls of your blood vessels increases. If uncontrolled, or poorly controlled, high blood pressure can be a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and chronic kidney disease. Also, chronic kidney disease can cause high blood pressure. Other conditions that affect the kidneys are: * Glomerulonephritis, a group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney's filtering units. These disorders are the third most common type of kidney disease. * Inherited diseases, such as polycystic kidney disease, which causes large cysts to form in the kidneys and damage the surrounding tissue. * Malformations that occur as a baby develops in its mother's womb. For example, a narrowing may occur that prevents normal outflow of urine and causes urine to flow back up to the kidney. This causes infections and may damage the kidneys. * Lupus and other diseases that affect the body's immune system. * Obstructions caused by problems like kidney stones, tumors or an enlarged prostate gland in men. * Repeated urinary infections.
17 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Chronic kidney failure, as opposed to acute kidney failure, is a slow and gradually progressive disease. Even if one kidney stops functioning, the other can carry out normal functions. It is not usually until the disease is fairly well advanced and the condition has become severe that signs and symptoms are noticeable; by which time most of the damage is irreversible. It is important that people who are at high risk of developing kidney disease have their kidney functions regularly checked. Early detection can significantly help prevent serious kidney damage. The most common signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease include: anemia blood in urine dark urine decreased mental alertness decreased urine output edema - swollen feet, hands, and ankles face if edema is severe fatigue tiredness hypertension (high blood pressure insomnia itchy skin, can become persistent loss of appetite male inability to get or maintain an erection erectile dysfunction more frequent urination, especially at night muscle cramps muscle twitches nausea pain on the side or mid to lower back panting shortness of breath protein in urine sudden change in bodyweight unexplained headaches
19 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 Kidneys carry out the complex system of filtration in our bodies - excess waste and fluid material are removed from the blood and excreted from the body. In most cases, kidneys can eliminate most waste materials that our body produces. However, if the blood flow to the kidneys is affected, they are not working properly because of damage or disease, or if urine outflow is obstructed, problems can occur. In the majority of cases, progressive kidney damage is the result of a chronic disease a long-term disease, such as: Diabetes - chronic kidney disease is linked to diabetes types 1 and 2. If the patient's diabetes is not well controlled, excess sugar glucose can accumulate in the blood. Kidney disease is not common during the first 10 years of diabetes; it more commonly occurs 15-25 years after diagnosis of diabetes. Hypertension high blood pressure - high blood pressure can damage the glomeruli - parts of the kidney involved in filtering waste products. Obstructed urine flow - if urine flow is blocked it can back up into the kidney from the bladder vesicoureteral reflux. Blocked urine flow increases pressure on the kidneys and undermines their function. Possible causes include an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, or a tumor. Kidney diseases - including polycystic kidney disease, pyelonephritis, or glomerulonephritis. Kidney artery stenosis - the renal artery narrows or is blocked before it enters the kidney. Certain toxins - including fuels, solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, and lead and lead-based paint, pipes, and soldering materials. Even some types of jewelry have toxins, which can lead to chronic kidney failure. Fetal developmental problem - if the kidneys do not develop properly in the unborn baby while it is developing in the womb. Systemic lupus erythematosis - an autoimmune disease. The body's own immune system attacks the kidneys as though they were foreign tissue.
20 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 There is no current cure for chronic kidney disease. However, some therapies can help control the signs and symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, and slow the progression of the disease. Patients with chronic kidney disease typically need to take a large number of medications. Treatments include: Anemia treatment Hemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that carries vital oxygen around the body. If hemoglobin levels are low, the patient has anemia. Some kidney disease patients with anemia will require blood transfusions. A patient with kidney disease will usually have to take iron supplements, either in the form of daily ferrous sulphate tablets, or occasionally in the form of injections. Phosphate balance People with kidney disease may not be able to eliminate phosphate from their body properly. Patients will be advised to reduce their nutritional phosphate intake - this usually means reducing consumption of dairy products, red meat, eggs, and fish. Vitamin D Patients with kidney disease typically have low levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones. The vitamin D we obtain from the sun or from food has to be activated by the kidneys before the body can use it. Patients may be given alfacalcidol, or calcitriol. High blood pressure High blood pressure is a common problem for patients with chronic kidney disease. It is important to bring the blood pressure down to protect the kidneys, and subsequently slow down the progression of the disease. Fluid retention People with chronic kidney disease need to be careful with their fluid intake. Most patients will be asked to restrict their fluid intake. If the kidneys do not work properly, the patient is much more susceptible to fluid build-up. Skin itching Antihistamines, such as chlorphenamine, may help alleviate symptoms of itching. Anti-sickness medications If toxins build up in the body because the kidneys don't work properly, patients
23 Apr 2017
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Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A doctor will check for signs and ask the patient about symptoms. The following tests may also be ordered: Blood test - a blood test may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease. Urine test - a urine test helps find out whether there is either blood or protein in the urine. Kidney scans - kidney scans may include a magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan, computed tomography CT scan, or an ultrasound scan. The aim is to determine whether there are any blockages in the urine flow. These scans can also reveal the size and shape of the kidneys - in advanced stages of kidney disease the kidneys are smaller and have an uneven shape. Kidney biopsy - a small sample of kidney tissue is extracted and examined for cell damage. An analysis of kidney tissue makes it easier to make a precise diagnosis of kidney disease. Chest X-ray - the aim here is to check for pulmonary edema fluid retained in the lungs. Glomerular filtration rate GFR - GFR is a test that measures the glomerular filtration rate - it compares the levels of waste products in the patient's blood and urine. GFR measures how many milliliters of waste the kidneys can filter per minute. The kidneys of healthy individuals can typically filter over 90 ml per minute. Changes in the GFR rate can assess how advanced the kidney disease is. In the UK, and many other countries, kidney disease stages are classified as follows: Stage 1 - GFR rate is normal. However, evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 2 - GFR rate is lower than 90 milliliters, and evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 3 - GFR rate is lower than 60 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease has been detected. Stage 4 - GRF rate is lower than 30 milliliters, regardless of whether evidence of kidney disease
25 Apr 2017
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