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0:22
This is exactly how it feels when there is only one female in a huge group of making friends. This duck seems sacred as among the group of bulls around her.
29 Apr 2019
579
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0:11
A group of men in fancy costume are cutting a guy's head. Well not exactly, they're cutting a traffic cone put over that guy's head.
12 May 2019
2113
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0:46
Gifted hacker, Roland West, is forced off the grid for 3 years until a cunning entrepreneur offers him with one final job. Before West finds out that the job involves a conspiracy against the government, he gets entangled in a game of corporate espionage where he must outwit an uncanny group of men.
3 Jan 2008
549
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1:00
Historical monument of the old time when a group of mens manufacturing sugar only by using their hands
1 Apr 2008
375
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0:30
Men wear underwear women, a group of men wearing happen?
5 Apr 2008
17478
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6:36
The first in a five part series this week is also the first half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
5 May 2008
415
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6:09
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The Second in a five part series this week is also the other half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
6 May 2008
870
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7:46
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The third in a five part series, this week, starts off a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which will become the topic of its own program over the next three days. In this installment we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... after the airshow business was rocked by the loss of a favored team's sponsorship (the Red Barons), do airshows provide the kind of value necessary to keep attracting high level sponsorship??? In the next two parts, we'll address the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Three Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
10 May 2008
612
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8:58
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The fourth in a five part series, this week, continues with a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which will become the topic of its own program over the course of the week. In this installment, we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... in a computerized/new media/iPod kind of world can airshows provide the kind of entertainment and excitement that will allow them to keep up with the times??? In the next two parts, we'll address the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Three Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
8 May 2008
195
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9:09
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The last in a five part series, this week, continues with a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which was the topic of its own program over the course of the week. In this final installment, we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... after a year in which there were a number of tragic but unrelated accidents, are airshows as safe as they can be??? Over the last few days, we addressed the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Five Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
13 May 2008
820
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1:18
Rainforest Rally The rainforest is under attack. One monkey is determined to save it. His name is Tomagochi. He's brown. He's small. He's plain. But when a group of men enters the rainforest armed with bulldozers and axes, Tomagochi the monkey springs into action to defend his natural habitat. While larger animals like Peshe the tiger run and hide, Tomagochi charges into battle. Will he be victorious? Will the rainforest be saved? Join Tomagochi as he fights to protect his home and discovers just how special he truly is. A Different Kind of Hero LEAH BETH EVANS, author COLLEEN GEDRICH, illustrator Over 35 pages of full-color illustrations. ISBN:9780979504525 5.5" x 8.5", paperback 40 pp 2007 Purchase your copy at: *******tribute-books****/minicart/products.html
14 May 2009
845
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2:11
I created this video when I found out some very interesting information about our Dollar Bill. The First Continental Congress requested that Benjamin Franklin and a group of men come up with a Seal. It took them four years to accomplish this task and another two years to get it approved. For more videos *******popularemails****
5 Aug 2008
2784
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