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3:38
Super Tuesday is the day that typically determines the presidential nomination winners in each party. A whopping 24 states are holding either a primary or a caucus-style election. So, in preparation for today, Daily Idea would like to officially endorse a candidate. Will it be Hillary or Obama? What about McCain or Romney? Or could we endorse someone else? With so many people dropping out, stay tuned over the next week or so, though, when we pick another candidate who’s still in the race.
5 Feb 2008
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0:34
Hillary Almost Coughs To Death during a live television interview on super Tuesday.
24 Sep 2008
948
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1:05
Official Music Video for the Non Official Theme Song "Super Obama Girl is Soooo Ho!!!", extracted from the album "Hillary Clinton Laughs + Fatboy Slim: Live! at the Playboy Mansion". Note: This is a mash up Hillary Clinton Laughs and Fatboy Slim Remixes. Search for the original audio, video and pics in Google****.
13 Aug 2008
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2:26
For more, read The Playbook: *******www.politico****/playbook Hillary Clinton gives her campaign a needed shake-up, Mike Huckabee explains why he’s staying in the race, NBC is done apologizing about David Shuster’s “pimped out” comment.
11 Feb 2008
186
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3:29
Hillary Clinton's George Bush Connection In the Clintons' pursuit of power, there is no such thing as a strange bedfellow. One recently exposed inamorata was Norman Hsu, the mysterious businessman from Hong Kong who brought in $850,000 to Hillary Clinton's campaign before being unmasked as a fugitive. Her campaign dismissed Hsu as someone who'd slipped through the cracks of an otherwise unimpeachable system for vetting donors, and perhaps he was. The same cannot be said for the notorious financier Alan Quasha, whose involvement with Clinton is at least as substantial--and still under wraps. Political junkies will recall Quasha as the controversial figure who bailed out George W. Bush's failing oil company in 1986, folding Bush into his company, Harken Energy, thus setting him on the path to a lucrative and high-profile position as an owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team, and the presidency. The persistently unprofitable Harken--many of whose board members, connected to powerful foreign interests and the intelligence community, nevertheless profited enormously--faced intense scrutiny in the early 1990s and again during Bush's first term. Now Quasha is back--on the other side of the aisle. Operating below the radar, he entered Hillary Clinton's circle even before she declared her candidacy by quietly arranging for the hire of Clinton confidant and longtime Democratic Party money man Terry McAuliffe at one of his companies. During the interregnum between McAuliffe's chairmanship of the Democratic Party and the time he officially joined Clinton's campaign, Quasha's firm set McAuliffe up with a salary and opened a Washington office for him. Just a few years earlier, McAuliffe had publicly criticized Bush for his financial dealings with Harken, disparaging the company's Enron-like accounting. Yet in 2005 McAuliffe accepted this cushy perch with Quasha's newly acquired investment firm, Carret Asset Management, and even brought along former Clinton White House business liaison Peter O'Keefe, who had been his senior aide at the Democratic National Committee. McAuliffe remained with the company until he became national chair of Hillary's presidential bid, and O'Keefe never left. McAuliffe's connection to Quasha has, until now, never been noted. Another strong link between Quasha and Clinton is Quasha's business partner, Hassan Nemazee, a top Hillary fundraiser who was trotted out to defend her during the Hsu episode--in which the clothing manufacturer was unmasked as a swindler who seemingly funneled illegal contributions through "donors" of modest means. In June, by liquidating a blind trust, the Clintons sought to distance themselves from any financial entanglements that might embarrass the campaign. Clinton spokesman Howard Wolfson argued that the couple had gone "above and beyond" what was legally required "in order to avoid even the hint of a conflict of interest." But throughout their political careers, Bill and Hillary Clinton have repeatedly associated with people whose objectives seemed a million miles from "a place called Hope." Among these Alan Quasha and his menagerie--including Saudi frontmen, a foreign dictator, figures with intelligence ties and a maze of companies and offshore funds--stand out. "That Hillary Clinton's campaign is involved with this particular cast of characters should give people pause," says John Moscow, a former Manhattan prosecutor. In the late 1980s and early '90s he led the investigation of the corrupt Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) global financial empire--a bank whose prominent shareholders included members of the Harken board. "Too many of the same names from earlier troubling circumstances suggests a lack of control over who she is dealing with," says Moscow, "or a policy of dealing with anyone who can pay." Keywords: Hillary Clinton, loses, pledged delegates, superdelegates, Barack Obama, wins, Bill Clinton, ME, VA, Washington DC, MD, WA, LA, NE, Demcratic Convention
12 Feb 2008
1287
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3:47
Analysis: Barack Obama has advantage over Hillary Clinton in head-to-head with John McCain Sen. John McCain became the likely Republican nominee after Mitt Romney decided to suspend his campaign Thursday. Now, the Democrats are debating who would do better against the Arizona Republican. Two polls this month have asked registered voters nationwide how they would vote if the choice were between McCain and Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton. A CNN poll, conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation February 1-3, shows Clinton three points ahead of McCain, 50 percent to 47 percent. That's within the poll's margin of error of 3 percentage points, meaning that the race is statistically tied.. A Time magazine poll, conducted February 1-4, also shows a dead heat between Clinton and McCain. Each was backed by 46 percent of those polled. In the CNN poll, Obama leads McCain by 8 points, 52 percent to 44 percent. That's outside the margin of error, meaning that Obama has the lead. And in the Time poll, Obama leads McCain by 7 points, 48 percent to 41 percent -- a lead also outside of the poll's margin of error of 3 percentage points. In both polls, Obama looks stronger than Clinton. Why? Obama's explanation: "I think there is no doubt that she has higher negatives than any of the remaining Democratic candidates. That's just a fact, and there are some who will not vote for her." That was three weeks ago. Now, only two Democratic candidates remain. Clinton does have higher negatives than Obama -- and McCain. Forty-four percent of the public say they don't like Clinton, compared with 36 percent who don't like McCain and 31 percent who don't like Obama, according to the CNN poll conducted February 1-3. Why does Obama do better against McCain than Clinton? Obama does do a little better than Clinton with independents and Republicans. But the big difference is men: Men give McCain an 18-point lead over Clinton, 57 percent to 39 percent, according to the CNN poll. But if McCain and Obama went head to head, McCain's lead among men shrinks to three, 49 percent to 46 percent -- statistically a tie. Women, on the other hand, vote for either Clinton or Obama by similar margins. Some Democrats may be worried about how Obama will fare with white voters. Whites give McCain a 15-point lead over Clinton, (56 percent for McCain, 41 percent for Clinton). But Obama actually fares better than Clinton with white voters. McCain still leads, but by a smaller margin, (52 to 43 percent). Obama argues that he can reach across party lines. And he does do a little better than Clinton with Independents and Republicans, at least in these polls. But the big difference is that Clinton doesn't draw very well with men. Obama does. Keywords: Hillary Clinton, loses, presidential election, John McCain, Barack Obama, beats, wins, head-to-head, Democratic candidate, November, Mark Penn Poll Date Sample McCain (R) Obama (D) Spread RCP Average 01/29 to 02/10 - 43.7% 47.4% Obama +3.7% AP-Ipsos 02/07 - 02/10 1,029 A 42% 48% Obama +6% USA Today/Gallup 02/08 - 02/09 1016 A 46% 50% Obama +4% Time 02/01 - 02/04 958 LV 41% 48% Obama +7% CNN 02/01 - 02/03 974 RV 44% 52% Obama +8% Cook/RT Strategies 01/31 - 02/02 855 RV 43% 45% Obama +2% ABC/Wash Post 01/30 - 02/01 1249 A 46% 49% Obama +3% FOX News 01/30 - 01/31 900 RV 43% 44% Obama +1% NPR 01/29 - 01/31 1000 LV 48% 47% McCain +1% Rasmussen (Mon) 4 Day Tracking 1700 LV 40% 44% Obama +4% --- Poll Date Sample McCain (R) Clinton (D) Spread RCP Average 01/29 to 02/10 - 46.6% 45.4% McCain +1.2% AP-Ipsos 02/07 - 02/10 1,029 A 45% 46% Clinton +1% USA Today/Gallup 02/08 - 02/09 1016 A 49% 48% McCain +1% Time 02/01 - 02/04 958 LV 46% 46% Tie CNN 02/01 - 02/03 974 RV 47% 50% Clinton +3% Cook/RT Strategies 01/31 - 02/02 855 RV 45% 41% McCain +4% ABC/Wash Post 01/30 - 02/01 1249 A 49% 46% McCain +3% FOX News 01/30 - 01/31 900 RV 45% 44% McCain +1% NPR 01/29 - 01/31 1000 LV 48% 45% McCain +3% Rasmussen (Mon) 4 Day Tracking 1700 LV 45% 43% McCain +2%
12 Feb 2008
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3:34
Hillary and Obama 2008
13 Feb 2008
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0:34
Clinton responds to people who claim he destroyed Hillary's campaign
14 Feb 2008
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2:14
Clinton Remained Silent As Wal-Mart Fought Unions Tapes Reviewed by ABC News Show Clinton As a Loyal Company Woman By BRIAN ROSS, MADDY SAUER and RHONDA SCHWARTZ Jan. 31, 2008— In six years as a member of the Wal-Mart board of directors, between 1986 and 1992, Hillary Clinton remained silent as the world's largest retailer waged a major campaign against labor unions seeking to represent store workers. Clinton has been endorsed for president by more than a dozen unions, according to her campaign Web site, which omits any reference to her role at Wal-Mart in its detailed biography of her. Wal-Mart's anti-union efforts were headed by one of Clinton's fellow board members, John Tate, a Wal-Mart executive vice president who also served on the board with Clinton for four of her six years. Tate was fond of repeating, as he did at a managers meeting in 2004 after his retirement, what he said was his favorite phrase, "Labor unions are nothing but blood-sucking parasites living off the productive labor of people who work for a living." Wal-Mart says Tate's comments "were his own and do not reflect Wal-Mart's views." But Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton and other company officials often recounted how they relied on Tate to lead the company's successful anti-union efforts. An ABC News analysis of the videotapes of at least four stockholder meetings where Clinton appeared shows she never once rose to defend the role of American labor unions. The tapes, broadcast this morning on "Good Morning America," were provided to ABC News from the archives of Flagler Productions, a Lenexa, Kan., company hired by Wal-Mart to record its meetings and events. A former board member told ABCNews**** that he had no recollection of Clinton defending unions during more than 20 board meetings held in private. The tapes show Clinton in the role of a loyal company woman. "I'm always proud of Wal-Mart and what we do and the way we do it better than anybody else," she said at a June 1990 stockholders meeting. Clinton would not agree to be interviewed on the subject but now says she no longer shares Wal-Mart's values and believes unions "have been essential to our nation's success." The videotapes do show that Clinton used her role to push for more environmentally friendly policies and better treatment of women. "We've got a very strong-willed young woman on our board now; her name is Hillary," said Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton at a 1987 stockholders meeting in describing Clinton's role in pushing for more women to be hired in management positions. Critics say Clinton's efforts produced few tangible results, and Wal-Mart is now defending itself in a lawsuit brought by 16 current and former female employees. "I don't doubt the sincerity of her efforts, but we don't see much evidence that conditions for women at Wal-Mart changed much during the late 1980s and early 1990s," said Joe Sellers, one of the lawyers suing Wal-Mart on behalf of the women. Wal-Mart declined to comment to ABC News about the lawsuit, but the company has said previously that it is confident it did not discriminate against female employees. According to the New York Times, Sen. Clinton "maintains close ties to Wal-Mart executives through the Democratic Party and the tightly knit Arkansas business community." The May 20, 2007 article also reported that her husband, former President Clinton, "speaks frequently to Wal-Mart's current chief executive, H. Lee Scott Jr." and held a private dinner at the Clinton's New York home in July 2006 for him. He did not directly respond when asked why she did not quit the board over the conpany's anti-union efforts. "Wal-Mart was Arkansas's largest employer when Sam Walton asked Sen. Clinton to join the board," he said. "As the first woman to join Wal-Mart's board, she worked hard to make it a better corporate citizen." In its statement, Wal-Mart described Sen. Clinton as "a valuable contributor" who "pushed us to be a better company." WI, Wisconsin, Hillary Clinton fights, Barack Obama, workers, unions, American jobs, overseas, foreclosures, NAFTA, trade agreements, corporate lawyer
14 Feb 2008
1419
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0:42
Hillary Clinton wants to pick a fight with Barack Obama...or at least pick a debate. Or two. Here's her appeal to the voters of Wisconsin. Cheesus Barack, don't be a brat!
14 Feb 2008
221
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0:46
The Path to The Nomination By Mark Penn, Chief Strategist Hillary Clinton Date: Wednesday, February 13, 2008 This election will come down to delegates. Votes are still being counted and delegates apportioned, but Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are separated by approximately 40 delegates right now – that is, barely 1% of all the delegates to the Democratic convention. Change Begins March 4th. Hillary leads in the three largest, delegate rich states remaining: Texas, Ohio and Pennsylvania. These three states have 492 delegates – 64 percent of the remaining delegates Hillary Clinton needs to win the nomination. According to the latest polls, Hillary leads in Texas (IVR Jan 30-31), Pennsylvania (Franklin & Marshall Jan 8-14) and Ohio (Columbus Dispatch Jan 23-31). After March 4th, over 3000 delegates will be committed, and we project that Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama will be virtually tied with 611 delegates still to be chosen in Pennsylvania and other remaining states. This does not even include Florida and Michigan (where Hillary won 178 delegates), whose votes we believe should be counted. The reason Hillary is so strong in Ohio, Texas and Pennsylvania is that her message of delivering solutions resonates strongly with voters in those states. Hillary is the only candidate who can deliver the economic change voters want – the only candidate with a real plan and a record of fighting for health care, housing, job creation and protecting Social Security. The demographics in these states also favor Hillary Clinton. Hillary won among white women by 6 points in Virginia and 18 points in Maryland, and white women make up a much bigger share of the electorate in these states (41% of 2004 Ohio Democratic primary voters, for instance, compared with only 33-35% of 2008 Maryland and Virginia Democratic primary voters). Hillary has also won large majorities among Latinos nationwide – 73% in New York, 67% in California, 68% in New Jersey, 62% in New Mexico, 59% in Florida and 55% in Arizona. Latinos made up 24% of Texas Democratic primary voters in 2004, and may be an even larger share in 2008. Hillary Clinton has shown that she has the ability and organization to compete financially and on the ground. She raised 10 million dollars in just three days last week, and will be competitive with Barack Obama in fundraising and TV advertising from now through March 4th and beyond. She has a strong organization in each of these key states and endorsements from Governor Strickland, Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones, and former Senator John Glenn in Ohio. Hillary had a huge 12,000 person rally in El Paso last night to kick off her Texas campaign. Again and again, this race has shown that it is voters and delegates who matter, not the pundits or perceived “momentum.” After Iowa, every poll gave Barack Obama a strong lead in New Hampshire, but he ended up losing the state. And after a defeat in South Carolina, Hillary Clinton went on to win by large margins in California, New York, Florida, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Arizona, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Arkansas. As history shows, the Democratic nomination goes to the candidate who wins the most delegates – not the candidate who wins the most states. In 1992, Bill Clinton lost a string of primaries before clinching the nomination. He ceded Iowa, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maryland, Arizona, Washington, Utah, Colorado, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Delaware, Vermont and South Dakota. And in 1976, Jimmy Carter lost twenty-three states before winning the nomination, including: Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, West Virginia, South Carolina, Alabama, Illinois, Mississippi, Minnesota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah. Keywords: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, lead, win, pledged delegates, superdelegates, OH, TX, primaries, Democratic Convention, Mark Penn
14 Feb 2008
1077
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2:36
Hillary Clinton acepta responsabilidad por su voto,con el cual autorizo la guerra contra Iraq. Video incluye recomendacion para el votante en 2008. (Hillary Clinton takes responsibility for her 2002 Iraq War authorization vote. Video includes recommendation for voter responsibility in 2008.)
18 Feb 2008
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