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Video made by the Icelandic coast guard of the volcano eruption near Eyjafjallajökull glacier, in South Iceland. The eruption started shortly before midnight on Saturday 20th of March 2010.
23 Mar 2010
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The true story of what happened to Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano
27 Apr 2010
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1:29
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
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2:14
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
675
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1:30
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
609
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2:00
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
645
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3:01
A phonecall in the dead of night was the first inkling the people living on the Thorvaldseyri farm had that Iceland's glacier-covered Eyjafjallajokull volcano was about to erupt. Hanna Lara Andrews, a half-English, half-Icelandic farmer who lives at the foot of the mountain which exploded on Wednesday morning with ferocious power, picked up the phone at 2am to be told by a civil protection official that she had only 20 minutes to evacuate her family, including her one-year-old son. The warning was clear: if they stayed on their dairy farm they risked being washed away by torrents of meltwater unleashed by the release of energy that had just begun inside the volcano, no more than four miles above them. It would be the volcano's first major eruption since 1821, since when it has lain dormant and anonymous to most of the world. Yesterday it made headlines when it transformed swaths of western Europe and Scandinavia into an unprecedented no-fly zone. "I had a bag ready because of the recent earthquakes in the area and grabbed a few things we might need for a couple of days and we went as quickly as possible," Andrews said from a safe house yesterday. "It is a huge shock to us all and it doesn't seem real at all." Her family, including her in-laws, drove a few miles away to a farmhouse designated for evacuation in the event of such an eruption. There they waited in trepidation for the possible destruction to begin. Their herd of 60 dairy cows and all their possessions were still at the farm – the closest property to a volcano that they had thought was dormant. They were among 700 people evacuated from the area by the Icelandic civil defence authority. Many had to stay in emergency Red Cross shelters. The floods arrived early the next morning. Andrews saw them coming down the mountain. Water melted by the red hot explosive eruptions bursting through the 200m-thick glacier poured off in torrents, washing away roads and sweeping into homes, she said. "By morning we could see through breaks in the cloud a huge evaporation cloud, like a mushroom. It must have been 20,000ft [6,100 metres] high. It looked enormous, far bigger than we have ever seen before." It was such an astonishing sight, her father-in-law, Olafur Eggertson, took a picture of the eruption dwarfing the family's red-roofed farm. Such was its force that three large holes visible on the glacier turned into a continuous rift running for about a mile and a half through the ice, said Rognvaldur Olafsson, who led the rescue effort for the civil defence authority. Mercifully, the wind, blowing east, carried the plume of ash away from Reyjkavik, the capital, but across farmland, where it turned day into night as it fell and blotted out the sun. This led to speculation, later played down by experts, that the eruption may have the potential to slow global warming. One local farmer told Icelandic television that he woke yesterday morning to find a layer of ash covering everything. Residents of Kirkjubaerklaustur, about 60 miles east of the eruption, said yesterday that ash was falling thick and dark, making it difficult to see more than a few yards. "The ash is causing huge disruption to the east of the glacier," Urður Gunnarsdóttir, a press spokeswoman for the foreign ministry, said at lunchtime yesterday. "You can't see anywhere and you can't drive because it is just black, like night." Erlundur Bjornsson, a sheep farmer 95km (59 miles) east of the volcano, told the Guardian that ash had fallen heavily and it had been "almost totally dark". "The plume came over my farm a couple of hours ago, but the wind direction has changed slightly and it is very fine here, a grey dust that gets in your eyes," he said. "It covers everything and there is a smell of sulphur in the air." In the early hours of yesterday, 24 hours after the eruption began and with the volcanic activity still intensifying, according to Icelandic volcanologists, the plume had risen seven miles into the sky and had blown across the Norwegian Sea to Scandinavia, and south east across the Shetland Isles, as far as the north coast of Scotland. The Met Office in Exeter produced diagrams showing the plume doubling again and again in size as it stretched to cover an area close to the size of Western Europe. Shetland residents said the sulphuric smell of rotten eggs was strong by early yesterday morning. "I noticed a smell in the house and wondered what it was," said Joanne Jamieson, from Sandwick on the southern tip of Mainland, the biggest island in Shetland. "It was coming from the outside, so I opened the door. It was very strong, and I initially thought it was rotting seaweed. I looked down to the beach and actually looked up to see if the sky was falling in." Jane Matthews, her neighbour, said: "It smelt strongly like rotten eggs, but I didn't put two and two together realising it was coming from Iceland," Initially, I thought maybe it's something to do with my young daughter, or the animals in the field." Air traffic controllers in Aberdeen had seen the plume coming. By noon on Wednesday they had predicted that local airspace could be closed for a few hours, but by evening it was clear the situation was more serious than that. Aberdeen airport's duty manager was alerted by Nats, the air navigation service, that its local north-east airspace would be closed. At 1am on Thursday, the closure order was confirmed, affecting more than 100 commercial flights during the day. By 3am, the whole of Scotland became a no- fly zone. Before dawn the Scottish government's civil emergency resilience unit was activated. By 9.30am air traffic control charts showed that planes were only taking off and landing across southern England. Anywhere north of that, the skies were empty. At 11am Gatwick's busy tarmac apron was at a standstill as airport managers prepared for a national shutdown of British airspace, which began at noon. Russell Craig, head of communications at Manchester airport, where 45,000 passengers were affected and hundreds of flights were cancelled, said: "It is difficult for passengers to understand because the planes are there and the sky is blue, but it would be dangerous to fly a plane in these conditions." Small aircraft were able to take off, said Craig, and the airport remained open in case a long-haul plane needed to execute an emergency landing. By 2.30pm the vast cloud had reached across England, and fears that its fine particles could cause passenger jets to crash caused an unprecedented shutdown of all of Britain's airports. No flights were to be allowed in or out until 7am this morning at the earliest.
10 May 2010
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0:41
Filmed on Fimmvörðuháls Iceland, just prior to the Eyjafjallajökul eruption.
27 Mar 2011
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0:18
WATCH IT LIVE iceland volcano, iceland, icelandair, island, islandia
25 Mar 2010
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RT Russia Today Heathrow Stansted London airports volcano in iceland icelandic volcano eruption uk flights cancelled Sweden Norway Eyjafjallajokull
16 Apr 2010
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RT volcano in iceland iceland volcano eruption video uk flights cancelled Sweden Norway Eyjafjallajokull uk airspace europe flights frankfurt airport closed Heathrow Stansted Frankfurt London airports ash cloud over europe air traffic test flights KLM Lufthansa people stranded air space boeing 737
19 Apr 2010
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1:41
Video made by the Icelandic coast guard of the volcano eruption near Eyjafjallajökull glacier, in South Iceland. The eruption started shortly before midnight on Saturday 20th of March 2010.
23 Mar 2010
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