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The Large Hadron Collider is the largest and most complex scientific instrument ever built and the highest energy particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator is located 100 m underground and runs through both French and Swiss territory. (27km circumference) Year 2008 marks the culmination of 20 years of work by over 8000 scientists thousands of engineers, technicians and support staff from over 80 different countries. Some critics say that this could create a black hole and could be the end of the universe. The first attempt starts on the 10th September 2008..! I, personally, find all this very interesting. I didn't even know what a LHC was until today but I've spent the morning learning lots. The science seems sound and those who are curious enough and have the opportunity to experiment will, I hope, have some questions answered. What will the answers be? Greater understanding of the Universe? A new source of energy to benefit our existence? A cataclysmic event that will bring about the end of the Earth? Nothing? Who knows? What I do know is that without the curiosity (and the fortitude)to find answers to our questions we would not learn. We would not learn how to read, write, hunt, fish, drive, communicate, develop, hypothesize, spiritualize etc. But do some of these answers come at a cost? Of course they do! When I was a kid I wondered if a bedsheet would be a good parachute if I jumped off my roof. The cost....well, let's just say me hitting the ground wasn't half as bad as when my Mum was finished with me. Obviously, the implications of some experiments can be far, far worse than my maiden flight. But what do we do? Come to a point where, "that's it! No more questions. If you've got 'em - too bad 'cos there'll be no more searching for answers." I don't think so. So, regardless of the outcome, at least we're still trying to find answers to our questions. But if it does go pear-shaped, I'm with Adam - safety in numbers people.
10 Sep 2008
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6:16
The Large Hadron Collider is the largest and most complex scientific instrument ever built and the highest energy particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator is located 100 m underground and runs through both French and Swiss territory. ( 27km circumference) Year 2008 marks the culmination of 20 years of work by over 8000 scientists thousands of engineers, technicians and support staff from over 80 different countries. some critics say that this could create a black hole and could be the end of the world.. the first attempt starts on the 10th september 2008..!(just a test run, the main collision with full power will happen in end of october) for more info folow the link. video is done by Chris Mann, CERN- european organization for nuclear research
13 Sep 2008
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6:16
Large Hadron Collider ( LHC )
11 Sep 2008
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large hadron collider LHC cern C.E.R.N particle accelerator proton big bang largest experiment black hole computer science engineering physical
13 Sep 2008
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7:36
Large hadron collider physics particle accelerator physicists parties particl
8 Dec 2009
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0:35
large bore 19 shot First Dynasty firework barrage. This firework barrage is mega loud - Go to epic fireworks for the largest range of fireworks in the UK - and all fireworks less than half price. Open 7 days - buy online. Fireworks available all year round.
14 Sep 2008
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2:40
video From Telegraph*** The £5 billion machine has been described as a 17-mile racetrack around which two streams of protons - building blocks of matter - run in opposite directions before smashing into one another. Reaching 99.99 per cent of the speed of light, each beam will pack as much energy as a Eurostar train travelling at 90 mph. The flashes from the collisions may help scientists reproduce the conditions that existed during the first moments after the Big Bang at the birth of the universe. Billed as the world's largest science experiment, the switch-on involved the first stream of subatomic particles - known as Hadrons - being fired into the tunnel, eagerly awaited by 10,000 scientists. Within an hour they had successfully completed a circuit, signified by two white dots flashing on a computer screen. The first collisions are expected in around 30 days. Physicists hope to learn more about the origins of mass, gravity and mysterious dark matter - the "glue" thought to hold the universe together. But concerns have been voiced - in particular by the German chemist Professor Otto Rossler - that black holes created by the LHC will grow uncontrollably and "eat the planet from the inside". These claims have been dismissed by leading scientists, including Prof Stephen Hawking of Cambridge University who said that the LHC is "feeble compared with what goes on in the universe. If a disaster was going to happen, it would have happened already." Watch: Stephen Hawking on the Large Hadron Collider experiment Watch: Telegraph TV visits CERN on the trail of the Higgs particle Watch: Large Hadron Collider workers' rap is YouTube hit The LHC will produce beams seven times more energetic than any previous machine, and around 30 times more intense when it reaches its design performance, probably by 2010.
16 Sep 2008
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6:16
End of the World? Search for God Particle. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator complex, intended to collide opposing beams of protons charged with approximately 7 TeV of energy. Its main purpose is to explore the validity and limitations of the Standard Model, the current theoretical picture for particle physics. It is theorized that the collider will produce the Higgs boson, the observation of which could confirm the predictions and missing links in the Standard Model, and could explain how other elementary particles acquire properties such as mass. The LHC was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and lies underneath the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. It is funded by and built in collaboration with over eight thousand physicists from over eighty-five countries as well as hundreds of universities and laboratories. The LHC is already operational and is presently in the process of being prepared for collisions. The first beams were circulated through the collider on 10 September 2008, and the first high-energy collisions are planned to take place after the LHC is officially unveiled on 21 October 2008. Although a few individuals have questioned the safety of the planned experiments in the media and through the courts, the consensus in the scientific community is that there is no conceivable threat from the LHC particle collisions. Concerns have been raised in the media and through the courts about the safety of the particle physics experiments planned to take place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator to date, built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, in Switzerland. The claimed dangers of the LHC particle collisions, which are scheduled to begin on 21 October 2008, include doomsday scenarios involving the production of stable micro black holes or the creation of hypothetical particles called strangelets. The potential risks of these unprecedented experiments were reviewed in 2003 by the LHC Safety Study Group, a group of independent scientists, who concluded that, like current particle experiments such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the LHC particle collisions pose no conceivable threat.A second review of the evidence commissioned by CERN in 2008 reaffirmed the safety of the LHC collisions in light of further research conducted since the 2003 assessment. The 2008 report was reviewed and endorsed by CERN's governing body and by the Division of Particles & Fields of the American Physical Society and was published in the Journal of Physics G. It concludes that any doomsday scenarios at the LHC are ruled out because the physical conditions and events that will be created in the LHC experiments occur naturally in the universe without hazardous consequences.
14 Sep 2008
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1:51
Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator complex, intended to collide opposing beams of protons (one of several types of hadrons) with very high kinetic energy. Its main purpose is to explore the validity and limitations of the Standard Model, the current theoretical picture for particle physics. It is theorized that the collider will confirm the existence of the Higgs boson, the observation of which could confirm the predictions and missing links in the Standard Model, and could explain how other elementary particles acquire properties such as mass. The LHC was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and lies underneath the Franco-Swiss border between the Jura Mountains and the Alps near Geneva, Switzerland. It is funded by and built in collaboration with over eight thousand physicists from over eighty-five countries as well as hundreds of universities and laboratories. The LHC is operational and is presently in the process of being p
15 Sep 2008
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Aerial view of CERN and the surrounding region of Switzerland and France. Three rings are visible, the smaller (at lower right) shows the underground position of the Proton Synchrotron, the middle ring is the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) with a circumference of 7 km and the largest ring (27 km) is that of the former Large Electron and Positron collider (LEP) accelerator with part of Lake Geneva in the background. (© CERN) The Large Hadron Collider Our understanding of the Universe is about to change... The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a gigantic scientific instrument near Geneva, where it spans the border between Switzerland and France about 100 m underground. It is a particle accelerator <*******public.web.cern.ch/public/en/Research/Accelerator-en.html> used by physicists to study the smallest known particles - the fundamental building blocks of all things. It will revolutionise our understanding, from the minuscule world deep within atoms to the vastness of the
8 Oct 2008
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7:18
Watch Mr. Dawson and the American Music Club Band play both "The World at Large" and "Level".
14 Oct 2008
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Large Mouth Bass and Golden Alga at Saguaro Lake by the Arizona Game and Fish Department *******www.azgfd.gov
24 Oct 2008
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