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DVD Available at: *******www.longtailnet****/1290 See what it takes to present the legendary band Rush during the 2008 Snakes & Arrows Concert Tour. It may seem like the most glamorous job, but being a roadie with a famous top-rated rock & roll band can be a grueling marathon of 18 hour days.
24 Dec 2009
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2:48
Me covering Rush's all time classic song as stated in the title. I think I did a pretty good job with it plus the few tweaks I put in the song cover itself. For original song, everyone knows what Youtube is, so go to Youtube and look up this song and listen because its awesome. Enjoy the cover.
26 Aug 2010
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0:35
Legendary progressive rock guitarist Alex Lifeson shows you how to play the intricacies of the Rush classic, "Limelight," originally released on the 1981 album "Moving Pictures." Included are all of the rhythm parts highlighting the main riff and arpeggiated verses in detail. This iVideosongs title also features one of Alex’ most memorable guitar solos, which he explains in its entirety. This is a sample of a 34 minute video available for download at iVideosongs****.
26 Mar 2008
1992
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0:35
Alex Lifeson, lead guitarist for the band Rush, teaches you how to play "The Spirit of Radio", which he performed with Rush in 1980 on the album "Permanent Waves." This is a sample of a 43 minute video available for download at iVideosongs****.
26 Mar 2008
4769
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Alex Lifeson, lead guitarist for the band Rush, teaches you how to play "Tom Sawyer", which he performed with Rush in 1981 on the album "Moving Pictures". This is a sample of a 43 minute video available for download at iVideosongs****.
26 Mar 2008
2107
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5:02
Rush tom sawyer bass cover If there has never been any real expectation around Rush it is due to the fact that the Canadian trio (although it has sold some millions of records) was never in the center of the reflector lights, Rush tom sawyer bass cover but, anyway, there have been many reasons of controversy. Rush tom sawyer bass cover Alternately labeled "poor imitation" of the most disparate groups (from Black Sabbath to King Crimson, and even Yes), or branded as fascists because of their ambiguous lyrics, Rush tom sawyer bass cover Rush has also been considered "the best of its kind" and " members of the elite that is at the apex of progressive rock ". From any perspective that wants to analyze the musical aspect of the trio, one can not discount the evolutionary aspect that has characterized (and still characterizes) its trajectory. Rush tom sawyer bass cover The founders of the group, the rude Geddy Lee (voice, bass and keyboards) and the blond Alex Lifeson (guitar), came from Sarnia, a small town in the province of Ontario, not far from Toronto. Rush tom sawyer bass cover The two, along with drummer John Rutsey, formed, in his stage of institute, a band specialized in versions Rush tom sawyer bass cover of Jimi Hendrix, Grand Funk, Iron Butterfly and Cream. They started playing at school parties and in the circuit of small pubs where, thanks to a new law that reduced the age necessary for alcohol consumption from 21 to 19 years, many boys Rush tom sawyer bass cover had the chance to know and appreciate them. The young local promoter Ray Daniels gave them his first great opportunity: to open the New York Dolls for a concert of these in Toronto. Rush tom sawyer bass
31 Jan 2019
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5:01
Overkill in union we stand bass cover The success obtained convinced Daniels to invest some money in the production of the group's first album, but the results were disastrous. They were also supported by Terry Brown, a producer already noted for his work with other Canadian bands of fame, such as April Wine, Thundermug and Procol Harum. But, despite the valuable result, no company wanted to publish it; In 1974 the album 'Rush' was released in Canada by his own company, Moon Records. Rush did not take long to recover the money invested, thanks to his fame as "live-band", and were lucky that Donna Halper, music manager of a major station in Cleveland, casually obtained a copy of the album. She was impressed by the group's potential and its effect on the listeners, and did not hesitate to recommend them to Mercury's directors. Once signed the contract and reedited the disc, at the end of that same year Rush could boast of having sold 75,000 copies. A month after the release of the album, Lee and Lifeson had to face the problem of replacing Rutsey, forced to leave the band for health reasons; the substitute was Neil Peart, a drummer who had already excelled in Toronto clubs. This acquisition proved important, not only because Neil knew how to become one of the most outstanding drum virtuosos in the world, but also because Peart's great interest in science fiction and fantasy literature would be, in short, the greatest inspiration for the lyrics of the group songs. As had happened with C. Lewis, Tolkien and Ayn Rand, all of them notable writers of fantasy literature misunderstood by critics, Peart, who drew inspiration from their books, was also rejected.
31 Jan 2019
217
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