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The report titled “Luxury Goods in the United States”, provides a comprehensive analysis of luxury goods market in the US, various luxury goods, leading vendors in luxury goods, trends in luxury goods market in the US, and future of luxury goods market in the United States. As the disposable income increases, consumers’ wealth increases and they prefer more of the luxury goods. Making a good more expensive can increase its supposed value and will be known as a luxury good such that the extent of sales go up drastically. Many manufactured products get the status of luxury goods because of their design, quality, durability and performance that are way superior to the available products. All the luxury goods are independent of qualities which are considered to be goods at the highest end of the market in terms of quality and price. Almost all the luxury goods manufacturers opt for special luxury packaging to differentiate their products from other competitors.
2 Apr 2018
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2:04
style - writing & luxury goods: Zeughausgasse 4, 6300 Zug, SWITZERLAND Tel: +41-41-7109329 Email: infostyleofzug.ch You are welcome to visit our 100m2 shop in name of "Style" where you can find more than 1'000 branded writing instruments and all the sophisticated collections of our main company Pandora Ltd liab. Co.
7 Feb 2010
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0:44
*******www.Xezo****/ Xezo is producing hand-made, high quality products: Timepieces, Writing Instruments, Leather Goods, and Eyewear.
15 Apr 2011
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2:26
Transcript by Newsy**** BY JACQUELINNE MEJIA You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy Watch out Paris and Milan--there’s a new fashion insider on the luxury goods map. Investment research group CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets says China is set to climb to the top of the luxury goods market by 2020 accounting for 44 percent of the market share. The report indicates... “Luxury goods companies are expanding rapidly in China to accommodate demand that will account for half of their forecasted global growth in the next 10 years. Handbags, leather goods, watches and jewelery are expected to see the fastest growth.” But euronews says luxury retailers don’t have to wait to see rising profits. “A growing appetite for luxury goods in China helped LVMH (Moët Hennessy • Louis Vuitton) post a 13 percent rise in sales in the final three months of last year. The world’s biggest luxury group made profit of 4.3 billion euros for all of 2010.” So what’s creating all of this buzz for an emerging luxury market? The Wall Street Journal says - economic growth and social customs. “Appearing ostentatious isn’t a faux pas in China, it’s often the goal. Cash-heavy consumers are eager to appear flashy and are willing to pay premium prices to catch second glances.” Although the CLSA report points out that men are buying more luxury goods than women, the CEO of Ferrari North America tells CNN Money he's not ready to rule out the spending power of the brand’s Chinese female clientele just yet. “Women are really a key player. In U.S., we sell almost 1 percent cars to women, in China, 30 percent.” But a blogger for the Financial Times warns not everything that glitters is gold - China may be an up-and-coming player, but the economic climate in the country could make things difficult for luxury retailers. “Rents at high-end Chinese shopping malls can be sky-high, meaning that mainland stores cannot afford to function simply as walk-through adverts for those planning a trip to the Champs-Elysee. That leaves luxury goods makers in something of a pickle – how to get customers in their fastest growing market to buy at higher prices.” Whether Chinese consumers decide to buy their luxury goods abroad or at home, a Bloomberg market analyst says nothing will stop the indefinite growth of the luxury market. “Barclay’s Capital says Chinese luxury goods market has the potential to grow by 20-30 percent per anm for the next five years. Now not even measures to cool the economy or curb inflation will stand in the way.” So what do you think? Is China the next big player in the luxury retail game? Or is this contest above their pay grade? Get more multisource business news analysis from Newsy
8 Feb 2011
695
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2:26
Transcript by Newsy BY JACQUELINNE MEJIA You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy Watch out Paris and Milan--there’s a new fashion insider on the luxury goods map. Investment research group CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets says China is set to climb to the top of the luxury goods market by 2020 accounting for 44 percent of the market share. The report indicates... “Luxury goods companies are expanding rapidly in China to accommodate demand that will account for half of their forecasted global growth in the next 10 years. Handbags, leather goods, watches and jewelery are expected to see the fastest growth.” But euronews says luxury retailers don’t have to wait to see rising profits. “A growing appetite for luxury goods in China helped LVMH (Moët Hennessy • Louis Vuitton) post a 13 percent rise in sales in the final three months of last year. The world’s biggest luxury group made profit of 4.3 billion euros for all of 2010.” So what’s creating all of this buzz for an emerging luxury market? The Wall Street Journal says - economic growth and social customs. “Appearing ostentatious isn’t a faux pas in China, it’s often the goal. Cash-heavy consumers are eager to appear flashy and are willing to pay premium prices to catch second glances.” Although the CLSA report points out that men are buying more luxury goods than women, the CEO of Ferrari North America tells CNN Money he's not ready to rule out the spending power of the brand’s Chinese female clientele just yet. “Women are really a key player. In U.S., we sell almost 1 percent cars to women, in China, 30 percent.” But a blogger for the Financial Times warns not everything that glitters is gold - China may be an up-and-coming player, but the economic climate in the country could make things difficult for luxury retailers. “Rents at high-end Chinese shopping malls can be sky-high, meaning that mainland stores cannot afford to function simply as walk-through adverts for those planning a trip to the Champs-Elysee. That leaves luxury goods makers in something of a pickle – how to get customers in their fastest growing market to buy at higher prices.” Whether Chinese consumers decide to buy their luxury goods abroad or at home, a Bloomberg market analyst says nothing will stop the indefinite growth of the luxury market. “Barclay’s Capital says Chinese luxury goods market has the potential to grow by 20-30 percent per anm for the next five years. Now not even measures to cool the economy or curb inflation will stand in the way.” So what do you think? Is China the next big player in the luxury retail game? Or is this contest above their pay grade? Get more multisource business news analysis from Newsy
8 Feb 2011
780
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0:20
Cash In with your good credit now using only your credit score. Contact Jason Labossiere 727-580-6162 www.mycreditheadquarters****
25 Apr 2008
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2:38
*******www.haroldpinchbeck****** Discover how the alluring, yet sometimes complicated luxury watch market is evolving: A small number of luxury bespoke English watchmakers are again making thier mark in the wrist watch arena, ready to restate their pride of place.
11 Sep 2010
276
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2:10
Business is business, but when a company secretively buys up a chunk of its rival, does business turn personal?
6 Nov 2010
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0:23
iTS COOLER is one of the best online luxury platforms located in Thailand, offering luxury products to Thai and Southeast Asia region. iTS COOLER specializes in luxury fashion, homewares, beauty, and lifestyle products including cars, adventure vehicles, motorbikes, and watercraft. We only list Mid to very high-end brands and products. Visit our website to know more about iTS COOLER services.
19 Jun 2018
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1:43
diamond bracele
28 Nov 2018
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1:19
*******www.globalchange**** 150,000 chain stores in 15 years with massive growth and consolidation of mom and pop small retail outlets. Specialisation, department stores, new markets, growth of middle class, designer products, luxury goods and services, competitors to wal-mart and other supermarket chains. Emerging markets and new economies, Asia, China, India and Africa. Conference keynote speaker and Futurist Dr Patrick Dixon
9 Feb 2009
659
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5:04
China and India are two of the largest and fastest growing economies in the world, but what are the differences and how would you choose which is right for you? We talked with emerging markets specialists Stephen Philips, Chief Executive of the China-Britain Business Council, Ian Coleman, Partner and Head of Emerging Markets at PricewaterhouseCoopers UK, and Chris Runckel President of Runckel and Associates. Chris Runckel: There really is no one China, you have china that’s along the Eastern sea board which now is a very, actually a more a more advanced developing area for doing business. It has very good infrastructure, road systems, very good communications system in the major cities. You have modern buildings, a lot of the accoutrements that any business would be looking for. Then you have the western area of the country which tends to be much poorer, much less developed, infrastructure is starting to go in there. The government is making a push to install infrastructure through the western region and it’s coming up but really the cost of internal shipping inside China and some of the other costs that are added in a project still makes western China not as attractive are as it might be. Stephen Philips: For most businesses they’re going to be focussing on the more urban areas, but those urban areas aren’t just Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, there are many cities across China that have more than a million people which is unlike the UK clearly. CBBC itself has got offices in 11 cities across China, most of those cities most British people will not even have heard of. Chongqing in the west of China for instance, it’s an urban area, has got 30 million people, half the size of the UK and yes it’s probably somewhere that the vast majority of people have never heard of. Chris Runckel: For the west you have India which is a very, very good location for lower cost projects which have more labour content in them. Fairly good protection of intellectual property, some significant issues for biotech where there’s not intellectual protection but there could be. But in many, and still with significant in terms of infrastructure, bureaucracy but definitely worth a look. Ian Coleman: If one compared China with India, two of the sort of largest emerging markets, everyone talks about them. These are hugely different beasts. You have a very well established entrepreneurial frame work in India; you don’t have it in China. There are linguistic differences. People often don’t understand India remains a hugely poor country, one of the biggest recipients of foreign aid, as well as being one of the biggest recipients of foreign direct investment, what a contrast. You have a GDP per head in China three times the level of India so China has a much larger middle class population. India is a much more polarised spread of wealth, far more extremely wealthy people so if you a luxury good manufacturer India might be more attractive than China. If you’re looking for a mass market retail type of proposition China looks hugely attractive. The Indian retail market is massively fragmented. China [has] the opportunity to build national distribution, huge opportunities. See more business news television shows featuring these experts, as they give their top expert business advice at *******www.yourbusinesschannel**** Find out more about the very latest show releases, as well as other yourBusinessChannel news by visiting our blog at *******www.yourbusinesschannel****/blog.aspx
9 Feb 2009
660
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