Results for: lyrique Search Results
Family Filter:
1:31
Café Lyrique: 12, Bd. du Théâtre, 1204 Genève, SUISSE Tel: +41-22-3280095 Email: restaurantcafe-lyrique.ch Magnifiquement situé au centre de Genève le Café Lyrique vous offre de la cuisine française traditionnelle dans une ambiance très parisienne. Le Café Lyrique se propose également pour des banquets ou repas d'affaires.
24 Jan 2010
458
Share Video

1:09
This video document is absolutely unique and exceptional, as it has never been issued before, nor was it ever shown to anyone until this very first day This personal archive is related to the greatest Maestro Nicolai GEDDA who is internationally considered by most operatic connoisseurs – from all over the world - as being assuredly one of the greatest tenor of all times The Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (born July 11, 1925) is a famous opera singer and recitalist. Having made some two hundred recordings, Gedda is said to be the most widely-recorded tenor in history. Gedda's singing is best known for his beauty of tone, vocal control, and musical perception. Nicolai Harry Gustav Gedda (Nikolaj Ustinov in Russian) was born in Stockholm to a Swedish mother and a Russian father. His father, a distant relative of Peter Ustinov, sang bass in a Don Cossack choir and was cantor in a Russian Orthodox church. Gedda grew up bilingual and learned English, German, Italian, and Latin. Gedda began his professional career as a bank teller in a local bank in Stockholm. One day a wealthy client overheard him speaking about his desire to sing professionally, and offered to pay for his tuition to study with Carl Martin Öhman, a well known Wagnerian tenor from the 1920s who also discovered Jussi Björling. An early appraisal of Gedda's singing was offered by Walter Legge, after first hearing Gedda sing for the role of Dimitry in a planned recording of Boris Godunov. "On my arrival at the airport I was asked by a swarm of journalists if I were not interested in hearing their excellent young Swedish voices. Naturally I was interested, but I did not expect either the front page stories that appeared next morning or the mass of letters and almost incessant telephone calls asking to be heard. I had to ask the Director of the Opera for a room for a couple of days to hear about 100 young aspirants. The first to sing to me (at 9.30 in the morning) was Gedda who had I believe sung only once in public. He sang the Carmen Flower Song so tenderly yet passionately that I was moved almost to tears. He delivered the difficult rising scale ending with a clear and brilliant B flat. Almost apologetically I asked him to try to sing it as written -- pianissimo, rallentando and diminuendo. Without turning a hair he achieved the near-miracle, incredibly beautifully and without effort. I asked him to come back at 8 that evening and sent word to my wife that a great singer had fallen into my lap and to Dobrowen that, believe it or not, this 23-year-old Gedda was the heaven-sent Dimitry for our Boris. In April 1952, at the age of 26, Gedda made his debut at the Royal Swedish Opera, performing the role of Chapelou in Adolphe Adam's Le Postillon de Longjumeau. In this same year he also performed the role of Nicklausse in Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann and the tenor role in Der Rosenkavalier. After an audition in Stockholm, Gedda gained the attention of conductor Herbert von Karajan, who took him to Italy. In 1953, he made his début at La Scala as Don Ottavio in Don Giovanni. In 1954, he made his Paris Opera debut in the tenor role in Weber's Oberon, and was given a permanent contract for several years. In 1957, Gedda made his Metropolitan Opera début in the title role of Gounod's Faust, and went on to sing 28 roles there over the next 26 years, including the world premieres of Barber's Vanessa and Menotti's The Last Savage. Gedda made his Royal Opera House Covent Garden début in 1954 as the Duke of Mantua in Verdi's Rigoletto and has since returned to sing Benvenuto Cellini, Alfredo, Gustavus III in Un Ballo in Maschera, Nemorino and Lensky. A singer of unusual longevity, Gedda has been active well into his late 70s; in May 2001 he recorded the role of the Emperor Altoum in Puccini's Turandot and the role of the High Priest in Mozart's Idomeneo in June 2003. Harry Gustaf Nikolaj Gädda, plus connu sous le nom de Nicolai Gedda, né le 11 juillet 1925 à Stockholm, est un ténor suédois. De par son beau-père russe Mikhaïl Ustinov, il est apparenté à Peter Ustinov. Après de jeunes années passées en Allemagne et une première formation musicale à Leipzig, il débute sur scène en 1952, dans sa ville natale, et continua à chanter jusque dans les années 1990. De tous les ténors de renom du XXe siècle, Nicolai Gedda a certainement été le plus polyglotte - il maîtrisait à la perfection aussi bien le suédois, le russe, l'allemand et l'anglais que l'italien et le français - et celui qui a laissé la discographie la plus abondante. Son répertoire comprenait une cinquantaine d'opéras différents (dont tous les grands opéras mozartiens), ainsi qu'un nombre imposant d'oratorios, de messes et de cantates. Sa voix claire et chaleureuse, très flexible, puissante, convenait idéalement aux rôles lyriques. S'il n'a jamais pu chanter Siegfried, il était un Belmonte ou un Tamino parfait. Discographie sélective La Flûte enchantée/Mozart/Otto Klemperer Passion selon Saint Matthieu/Johann Sebastian Bach/Klemperer The Dream of Gerontius/Edward Elgar/Adrian Boult Lady Macbeth de Mzensk/Dmitri Chostakovitch/Mstislav Rostropovitch Boris Godounov/Modeste Moussorgsky/Jerzy Semkow Madame Butterfly/Giacomo Puccini/Herbert von Karajan Rigoletto/Giuseppe Verdi/Francesco Molinari-Pradelli
8 Jun 2007
7196
Share Video

5:31
Dominique Mezin (soprano lyrique) accompanied by Stéphane Eliot (électone) at VIP Champagne Party organized by Riviera Radio at 42nd Salon du Meuble et de la Décoration
21 Mar 2010
637
Share Video

0:45
Dialogues of the Carmelites (in French, Dialogues des Carmélites) is an opera in three acts by Francis Poulenc. In 1953, M. Valcarenghi approached Poulenc to commission a ballet for La Scala in Milan; when Poulenc found the proposed subject uninspiring, Valcarenghi suggested instead the screenplay by Georges Bernanos, based on the novella Die Letzte am Schafott (The Last on the Scaffold), by Gertrud von le Fort. Von le Fort's story was based in turn on historical events which took place at a Carmelite convent in Compiègne during the French Revolution. Some sources credit Emmet Lavery as librettist or co-librettist, but others only say "With the permission of Emmet Lavery." According to the article by Ivry, cited below, Lavery owned the theatrical rights to the story, and following a legal judgement over the copyright, his name must be given in connection with all staged performances. The opera was first performed in an Italian version at la Scala on 26 January 1957; the original French version premiered 21 June 1957 by the Paris Théâtre National de l'Opéra (the current Opéra National de Paris). The Dialogues contributes to Poulenc's reputation as a composer especially of fine vocal music. The dialogues are largely set in recitative, with a melodic line that closely follows the text. The harmonies are lush, with the occasional wrenching twists that are characteristic of Poulenc's style. Poulenc's deep religious feelings are particularly evident in the gorgeous a cappella setting of Ave Maria in Act II, Scene II, and the Ave verum corpus in Act II, Scene IV. The libretto is unusually deep in its psychological study of the contrasting characters of Mère Marie de l'Incarnation and Blanche de la Force. The popularity of the Dialogues of the Carmelites appears to be growing. Two television productions are available on DVD. The original recording with Pierre Dervaux conducting is considered by some to be the finest audio version. The opera has recently been performed by Trinity College of Music, London, under the direction of Bill Bankes-Jones. Roles Role Vocal type Milan premiere, 26 January, 1957 Paris premiere, 21 June, 1957 - Marquis de la Force baritone Scipio Colombo Xavier Depraz - Chevalier de la Force, his son tenor Nicola Filacuridi Jean Giraudeau - Blanche de la Force, his daughter soprano Virginia Zeani Denise Duval - Thierry, a footman baritone Armando Manelli Forel - Madame de Croissy, the prioress contralto Gianna Pederzini Denise Scharley - Sister Constance of St. Denis, a young novice soprano Eugenia Ratti Liliane Berthon - Mother Marie of the Incarnation, assistant prioress mezzo-soprano Gigliola Frazzoni Rita Gorr - M. Javelinot, a doctor baritone Carlo Gasperini Max Conti - Madame Lidoine, the new prioress soprano Leyla Gencer Régine Crespin - Mother Jeanne of the Child Jesus contralto Vittoria Palombini Fourrier - Sister Mathilde mezzo-soprano Fiorenza Cossoto Desmoutiers - Father confessor of the convent tenor Alvino Manelli Forel - First commissary tenor Antonio Pirino Romagnoni - Second commissary baritone - Officer baritone - Geolier baritone - Carmelites, Officers, Prisoners, Townspeople chorus Plot synopsis The action takes place during the French Revolution and subsequent Terror. Act I. The pathologically timid Blanche de la Force decides to retreat from the world and enter a Carmelite convent. The Mother Superior informs her that the Carmelite order is not a refuge: it is the duty of the nuns to guard the Order, not the other way around. In the convent, the jolly Sister Constance tells Blanche (to her consternation) that she has had a dream that the two of them will die young together. The Mother Superior, who is dying, commits Blanche to the care of Mother Marie. The Mother Superior passes away in great agony, shouting in her delirium that despite her long years of service to God, He has abandoned her. Blanche and Mother Marie, who witness her death, are shaken. Act II. Sister Constance remarks to Blanche that the Mother Superior's death seemed unworthy of her, and speculates that she had been given the wrong death, as one might be given the wrong coat in a cloakroom. Perhaps someone else will find death surprisingly easy. Perhaps we die not for ourselves alone, but for each other. Blanche's brother, the Chevalier de la Force, arrives to announce that their father thinks Blanche should withdraw from the convent, since she is not safe there (being a member of both the nobility and the clergy). Blanche refuses, saying that she has found happiness in the Carmelite order, but later admits to Mother Marie that it is fear (or the fear of fear itself, as the Chevalier expresses it) that keeps her from leaving. The chaplain announces that he has been forbidden to preach (presumably for being a non-juror under the Civil Constitution of the Clergy). The nuns remark on how fear now governs the country, and no one has the courage to stand up for the priests. Sister Constance asks, "Are there no men left to come to the aid of the country?" "When priests are lacking, martyrs are superabundant," replies the new Mother Superior. Mother Marie says that the Carmelites can save France by giving their lives, but the Mother Superior corrects her: it is not permitted to become a martyr voluntarily; martyrdom is a gift from God. A police officer announces that the Legislative Assembly has nationalized the convent and its property, and the nuns must give up their habits. When Mother Marie acquiesces, the officer taunts her for being eager to dress like everyone else. She replies that the nuns will continue to serve, no matter how they are dressed. "The people has no need of servants," proclaims the officer haughtily. "No, but it has a great need for martyrs," responds Mother Marie. "In times like these, death is nothing," he says. "Life is nothing," she answers, "when it is so debased." Act III. In the absence of the new Mother Superior, Mother Marie proposes that the nuns take a vow of martyrdom. However, all must agree, or Mother Marie will not insist. A secret vote is held; there is one dissenting voice. Sister Constance declares that she was the dissenter, and that she has changed her mind, so the vow can proceed. Blanche runs away from the convent, and Mother Marie finds her in her father's library. Her father has been guillotined, and Blanche has been forced to serve her former servants. The nuns are all arrested and condemned to death, but Mother Marie is away (with Blanche, presumably) at the time. The chaplain tells Mother Marie that since God has chosen to spare her, she cannot now voluntarily become a martyr by joining the others in prison. The nuns march to the scaffold, singing Salve Regina. At the last minute, Blanche appears, to Constance's joy; but as she mounts the scaffold, Blanche changes the hymn to Deo patri sit gloria (All praise be thine, O risen Lord). References and external links Carmel's Heights - This CD album is an attempt to share with all some of Carmel's Saints - real persons of flesh and blood - who share with us in song their own spiritual experiences. Cries from the Scaffold, Benjamin Ivry, Commonweal, 6 April 2001. Dialogues des Carmélites, Henri Hell, liner notes to the recording EMI compact disc no. 7493312. Les Dialogues des Carmélites est un opéra en trois actes composé par Francis Poulenc (1899-1963), sur un livret d'Emmet Lavery, basé sur la pièce de Georges Bernanos (1888-1948). Cet opéra fut créé le 26 janvier 1957, à la Scala de Milan. Personnages Le marquis de La Force (Baryton) Le chevalier de La Force, son fils (Ténor) Blanche de La Force (Soeur Blanche de l'Agonie du Christ), sa fille (Soprano) Thierry, un laquais (Baryton) Mme de Croissy (Mère Henriette de Jésus), la prieure (Contralto) Soeur Constance de Saint Denis, jeune novice (Soprano) Mère Marie de l'Incarnation, sous-prieure (Mezzo-soprano) M. Javelinot, médecin (Baryton) Mme Lidoine (Mère Marie de Saint Augustin), la nouvelle prieure (Soprano) Mère Jeanne de l'Enfant Jésus (Contralto) Soeur Mathilde (Mezzo-soprano) Le père confesseur du couvent (Ténor) Le premier commissaire (Ténor) Le second commissaire (Baryton) Officier, geôlier, Carmélites Francis Poulenc, né le 7 janvier 1899 à Paris, mort le 30 janvier 1963 à Paris, est un compositeur français, membre du groupe des Six. Biographie Son père est un des fondateurs des établissements Poulenc Frères, qui devinrent Rhône-Poulenc. Bien qu'il ait suivi quelques cours de composition avec Charles Koechlin, Poulenc est considéré comme un compositeur autodidacte. Après une scolarité au lycée Condorcet, il connaît à dix-huit ans une première réussite avec une Rapsodie nègre. Avec la Première Guerre mondiale, sa production n'est guère importante. Il compose cependant Le Bestiaire, un cycle de mélodies. Ricardo Vinès lui fait rencontrer notamment Isaac Albéniz, Claude Debussy et Maurice Ravel. Poulenc fait partie, avec Georges Auric, Louis Durey, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud et Germaine Tailleferre du groupe informel de musiciens que le critique Henri Collet surnommera en 1920 le Groupe des Six, en référence au Groupe des Cinq russe (Moussorgski, Cui, Balakirev, Borodine, Rimski-Korsakov). Leur esthétique commune, influencée par Satie et Cocteau, est une réaction contre le romantisme et le wagnérisme, et aussi, dans une certaine mesure, contre le courant impressionniste. En 1926, il rencontre le baryton Pierre Bernac pour lequel il compose un grand nombre de mélodies. Il l'accompagne, à partir de 1935 (et jusqu'à sa mort en 1963), dans des récitals de musique française donnés autour du monde. En 1928, le compositeur écrit Le Concert champêtre, oeuvre pour clavecin et orchestre destinée à la grande claveciniste Wanda Landowska et dédié à son compagnon, le peintre Richard Chanelaire. En 1935, de passage à Rocamadour et consécutivement à la mort accidentelle de son ami, le compositeur et critique Pierre-Octave Ferroud, il vit un profond retour à la foi catholique de son enfance. Le critique Claude Rostand, pour souligner la coexistence ou l'alternance chez Poulenc d'une grande gravité et de la foi catholique avec l'insouciance et la fantaisie, a forgé la formule célèbre "moine ou voyou". Ainsi, à propos de son Gloria, qui provoqua quelques remous, le compositeur lui-même déclara : « J’ai pensé, simplement, en l’écrivant à ces fresques de Gozzoli (Benozzo Gozzoli) où les anges tirent la langue, et aussi à ces graves bénédictins que j’ai vus un jour jouer au football ». Il compose ses Litanies à la Vierge noire de Rocamadour, pour choeur de femmes et orgue (qu'il orchestrera ultérieurement), en 1936. Ses oeuvres religieuses par la suite furent notamment une messe (1937), un Stabat Mater (1950) et un Gloria (1959). Le compositeur écrira aussi son fameux Les Dialogues des Carmélites en 1957. Il a laissé plusieurs enregistrements comme pianiste soliste ou accompagnateur. On dispose aussi d'enregistrements parfois supervisés par lui et interprétés par des artistes qu'il privilégiait de son vivant, comme le baryton Pierre Bernac, la soprano Denise Duval ou le chef d'orchestre Georges Prêtre. Il est enterré au cimetière du Père Lachaise à Paris. Georges Bernanos Georges Bernanos est un écrivain français né le 20 février 1888 à Paris, décédé le 5 juillet 1948 à Neuilly-sur-Seine et est enterré dans le cimetière de Pellevoisin. Il passe sa jeunesse à Fressin en Artois où il compose jusqu'en 1924 ses romans. Choqué par les reculades du Royaume-Uni et de la France culminant au moment des accords de Munich, il s'exile au Brésil. Il meurt en laissant le manuscrit d'un dernier livre, posthume : La France contre les robots. Parcours Son père est un artisan et sa mère, pieuse, femme de chambre chez le châtelain. Il garde de son éducation une foi catholique et des convictions monarchistes, et concevra toute sa vie une admiration sans faille pour le fondateur du journal La Libre parole, Edouard Drumont. Premiers engagements Catholique fervent, nationaliste passionné, il milite très jeune dans les rangs de l'Action française en participant aux activités des Camelots du roi pendant ses études de lettres, puis à la tête du journal, L'Avant-Garde de Normandie jusqu'à la Grande guerre. Réformé, il décide tout même de participer à la guerre en se portant volontaire dans le 6e regiment de dragons (cavalerie) ; il aura de nombreuses blessures au champ d'honneur. Après la guerre, il s'éloigne d'une activité militante, mais se rapproche de nouveau de l'Action Française lors de la condamnation romaine de 1926 et participe à certaines de ses activités culturelles. En 1932, sa collaboration au Figaro du parfumeur François Coty entraîne une violente polémique avec l'AF et sa rupture avec Charles Maurras. Premières oeuvres Dans les années 1920, il travaille dans une compagnie d'assurances, mais le succès de son premier roman, Sous le soleil de Satan (1926), l'incite à entrer dans la carrière littéraire. Ayant épousé en 1917 Jeanne Talbert d'Arc, lointaine descendante d'un frère de Jeanne d'Arc, il mène alors une vie matérielle difficile et instable dans laquelle il entraîne sa famille de six enfants et son épouse à la santé fragile. Il écrit en dix ans l'essentiel de son oeuvre romanesque où s'expriment ses hantises : les péchés de l'humanité, la puissance du malin et le secours de la grâce. Le Journal d'un curé de campagne En 1936, paraît Le Journal d'un curé de campagne, qui sera couronné par le Grand prix du roman de l'Académie française, puis adapté au cinéma sous le même titre par Robert Bresson (1950). Ce livre est sans aucun doute porteur d'une double spiritualité : celle du Curé d'Ars et celle de sainte Thérèse de l'Enfant Jésus, tous deux portés sur les autels par Pie XI en 1925. Comme Jean-Marie Vianney, notre jeune prêtre est ici dévoré par son zèle apostolique, consacré qu'il est à la sanctification du troupeau qui lui a été confié. De Thérèse, il suit la petite voie de l'enfance spirituelle. Le "Tout est grâce" final du roman n'est d'ailleurs pas de Bernanos lui-même, mais de sa prestigieuse aînée. L'exil aux Baléares, puis au Brésil Installé aux Baléares, il assiste au début de la guerre d'Espagne et prend parti pour, puis contre les franquistes dans Les Grands Cimetières sous la Lune, un pamphlet qui consacre sa rupture publique avec ses anciens amis de l'Action française, sa rupture avec Maurras -datant de 1927- étant restée secrète jusque-là. Il y condamne les exactions et les massacres perpétrés par les phalangistes au nom du Christ, mais aussi le soutien apporté aux nationalistes espagnols par Maurras et l'Action française. Il quitte l'Espagne en mars 1937 et retourne en France. Le 20 juillet 1938 il choisit de s'exiler en Amérique du sud. Il prévoit initialement de se rendre au Paraguay. Il fait escale à Rio de Janeiro au Brésil ( [1] ) en Août 1938. Il décide d'y rester et y demeurera de 1938 à 1945. En Août 1940 il s'installera à Barbacena, dans une petite maison au flanc d'une colline dénommée Cruz das almas, la Croix-des-âmes. Il s'éloigne alors du roman et publie de nombreux essais et "écrits de combat" dans lesquels l'influence de Péguy se fait sentir. En 1939 ses trois fils reviennent du Brésil pour être incorporés dans l'armée française. Pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale il soutient la Résistance et l'action de la France libre dans de nombreux articles de presse où éclate son talent de polémiste et de pamphlétaire. La Libération Il poursuit une vie errante après la Libération. Le général de Gaulle l'invite à revenir en France, où il veut le placer y compris au gouvernement ou à l'Académie. Bernanos revient, mais malade et n'ayant pas l'échine souple, reste en marge avant de se fixer en Tunisie. Bernanos rédige quelque temps avant sa mort un scénario cinématographique adapté du récit La dernière à l'échafaud de Gertrud von Le Fort, lui-même inspiré de l'histoire véridique de carmélites guillotinées sur la place du Trône, appelées les Carmélites de Compiègne, en y ajoutant le personnage fictif de Blanche de La Force (translittération de G. von Le Fort). Ce scénario, intitulé Les Dialogues des Carmélites est devenu le livret de l'opéra du même nom du compositeur Francis Poulenc, créé en 1957, puis a servi de base au film du Père Bruckberger, en 1960. Il a aussi été adapté au théâtre. Bernanos y traite de la question de la Grâce, de la peur, du martyre. L'oeuvre Le monde romanesque Bernanos situe souvent l'action de ses romans dans les villages de son Artois natal, en en faisant ressortir les traits sombres. La figure du prêtre catholique est très présente dans son oeuvre, et est parfois le personnage central, comme dans Le Journal d'un curé de campagne. Autour de lui gravitent les notables locaux (châtelains nobles ou bourgeois), les petits commerçants, et les paysans. Bernanos fouille la psychologie de ses personnages et fait ressortir leur âme en tant que siège du combat entre le Bien et le Mal. Il n'hésite pas à faire parfois appel au divin et au surnaturel. Jamais de réelle diabolisation chez lui, mais au contraire, comme chez Mauriac, un souci de comprendre ce qui se passe dans l'âme humaine derrière les apparences. Le style pamphlétaire Aussi isolé - en tout cas en France - qu'un Don Quichotte, il avait dénoncé les trahisons aussi bien dans le sens autoritaire et agricole de l'État français que la technique dans ce qu'elle avait de liberticide. Ses essais traduisent par ailleurs un goût de l'amour physique et conjugal qu'on ne reverra ensuite que chez Jacques de Bourbon Busset. Le mot Imbéciles (au pluriel) revient souvent sous la plume de Bernanos dans ses essais. Par cette injure fraternelle, il manifestait sa « pitié » pour « les petits cancres de la nouvelle génération réaliste » (les néo-maurrassiens des années 1930), et, plus tard, pour « les affreux cuistres bourgeois de gauche » (les communistes et les démocrates-chrétiens), mais aussi pour tous ceux chez qui la propagande des médias, le manque de courage personnel et la manipulation par des abstractions excessives avaient fini par remplacer l'expérience humaine réelle et concrète. Son style ne peut être qualifié de « parlé », bien qu'il s'adresse souvent à un lecteur imaginaire. Ample et passionné (ses pages sur le Brésil ou sur Hitler ne peuvent laisser indifférent), sa lecture nécessite toutefois une profonde connaissance de l'histoire de France. Sur la question de l'antisémitisme, il est essentiel de ne pas se contenter de lire les textes de combat publiés essentiellement dans les années 1930 qui peuvent choquer, mais de lire l'étonnante lettre qu'il écrit en 1945 à ce sujet, dans laquelle on trouve la fameuse phrase : "Hitler a déshonoré l'antisémitisme". Bernanos reste attaché à un style antisémite qui lui vient des années de l'affaire Dreyfus et, en particulier, d'Édouard Drumont dont il retrace la vie dans La Grande peur des bien-pensants. Citations "L'optimisme est une fausse espérance à l'usage des lâches et des imbéciles. L'espérance, est une vertu, virtus, une détermination héroïque de l'âme. La plus haute forme de l'espérance, c'est le désespoir surmonté". "Être d'avant garde c'est savoir ce qui est mort; etre d'arrière garde c'est l'aimer encore". "On n'attend pas l'avenir comme on attend un train: on le fait". "Qu'un niais s'étonne du brusque essor d'une volonté longtemps contenue, qu'une dissimulation nécessaire, à peine consciente, à déjà marqué de cruauté, revanche ineffable du faible, éternelle surprise du fort, et piège toujours tendu!" (Histoire de Mouchette) "Les sentiments les plus simples naissent et croissent dans une nuit jamais pénetrée, s'y confondent ou s'y repoussent selon de secrètes affinités, pareils à des nuages électriques, et nous ne saisissons à la surface des ténèbres que les brèves lueurs de l'orage inaccessible." (Histoire de Mouchette) "Il n'y a de vraiment précieux dans la vie que le rare et le singulier, la minute d'attente et le pressentiment." (Sous le soleil de Satan) "Quand un homme -ou un peuple- a engagé sa parole, il doit la tenir, quel que soit celui auquel il l'a engagée." (Préface "'Journal d'un curé de campagne'") "C'est que notre joie intérieure ne nous appartient pas plus que l'oeuvre qu'elle anime, il faut que nous la donnions à mesure, que nous mourions vides, que nous mourions comme des nouveau-nés (...) avant de se réveiller, le seuil franchi, dans la douce pitié de Dieu, comme dans une aube fraîche et profonde." (Ibid) "Pour moi, le passé ne compte pas. Le présent non plus d'ailleurs, ou comme une petite frange d'ombre, à la lisière de l'avenir." ( "Monsieur Ouine") "Ah! c'était bien là l'image que j'ai caressé tant d'années, une vie, une jeune vie humaine, tout ignorance et tout audace, la part réelement périssable de l'univers, seule promesse qui ne sera jamais tenue, merveille unique! (...) Une vraie jeunesse est aussi rare que le génie, ou peut-être ce génie même un défi à l'oredre du monde, à ses lois, un blasphème!" ("Monsieur Ouine") "Il n'y a pas de pente dans la vie d'un gosse" ("Monsieur Ouine") "-Moi, je me méfie. D'une manière ou d'une autre, monsieur Ouine, je me méfie de Dieu -telle est ma façon de l'honorer." ("Monsieur Ouine") "Souffrir, croyez-moi, cela s'apprend." ("Monsieur Ouine") "Quand je mesure le temps que nous avons perdu à chercher des héros dans nos livres, j'ai envie de nous battre, Guillaume. Chaque génération devrait avoir ses héros bien à elle, des héros bien à elle, des héros selon son coeur. On ne nous a peut-être pas jugés dignes d'en avoir des neufs, on nous repasse ceux qui ont déjà servi." ("Monsieur Ouine") Oeuvres Romans Sous le soleil de Satan, Paris, Plon, 1926. L'imposture, Paris, Plon, 1927. La joie, la Revue universelle, 1928, puis, Paris Plon, 1929. Un crime, Paris, Plon, 1935. Journal d'un curé de campagne, la Revue hebdomadaire, 1935-1936, puis, Paris, Plon, 1936. Nouvelle Histoire de Mouchette, Paris, Plon, 1937. Monsieur Ouine, Rio de Janeiro, 1943, puis Paris, Plon, 1946. Les Dialogues des Carmélites, Paris, Seuil, 1949. Un mauvais rêve, Paris, Plon, 1950. Essais La Grande peur des bien-pensants, Paris, Grasset, 1931. Les Grands Cimetières sous la Lune, Paris, Plon, 1938. Scandale de la vérité, Gallimard, Paris, 1939. La France contre les robots, Rio de Janeiro, 1944, puis Robert Laffont, 1947. Le Chemin de la Croix-des-Âmes, Rio de Janeiro de 1943 à 1945, 4 volumes, puis Gallimard, 1948. Les Enfants humiliés, Gallimard, 1949. Recueils d'articles Français, si vous saviez... (Recueil d'articles écrits entre 1945 et 1948), Paris, Gallimard, 1961. Etudes sur Bernanos Biographie Jean Bothorel, Bernanos, le Mal pensant, Paris, Grasset, 1998. Joseph Jurt, « [Georges Bernanos] Une parole prophétique dans le champ littéraire », dans Europe, n°789-790, janvier – février 1995, p. 75-88. Joseph Jurt, Les attitudes politiques de Georges Bernanos jusqu'en 1931, Fribourg, Éditions Universitaires, 1968, 359 p. Bibliographie Hans Urs von Balthasar. Le chrétien Bernanos. Traduit de l’allemand par Maurice de Gandillac. Paris, Seuil, 1956. Jean de Fabrègues, Bernanos tel qu'il était, Paris, Mame, 1962 Jean-Louis Loubet del Bayle, L'illusion politique au XXe siècle. Des écrivains témoins au XXe siècle, Paris, Economica, 1999. Cahiers de l'Herne. Bernanos. Paris, Pierre Belfond, 1967. Cahier dirigé par Dominique de Roux, avec des textes de Thomas Molnar, Michel Estève (et al). Georges Bernanos au Brésil: 1938-1945 “ Le plus grand, le plus profond, le plus douloureux désir de mon coeur en ce qui me regarde c’est de vous revoir tous, de revoir votre pays, de reposer dans cette terre où j’ai tant souffert et tant espéré pour la France, d’y attendre la résurrection, comme j’y ai attendu la victoire. ” Musée Georges Bernanos à Barbacena, État de Minas Gerais, Brésil *******www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/label_france/FRANCE/LETTRES/bernanos/bernanos.html *******agora.qc.ca/mot.nsf/Dossiers/Georges_Bernanos
28 Jun 2007
7155
Share Video

4:19
extrait de l'operette de Lecocq: les cent vierges...
12 Jan 2021
24
Share Video

2:21
This is the very first issue of this rare & private Live video of The Lord’s Prayer, originally composed by Albert Hay Malotte and rendered quite famous through Mario Lanza, who offered a wonderful & magic unforgettable interpretation of this aria in his movie “Because you’re mine”. This new current version you’re listening shows an original musical arrangement for symphonic orchestra, piano, male chorus & solo voice. It was specially composed for and sung during the celebration of a marriage in Switzerland on July 31, 1999. The Lord's Prayer, also known as the Our Father or Pater noster, is probably the best-known prayer in Christianity. On Easter Sunday 2007 it was estimated that 2 billion Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox Christians read, recited, or sang the short prayer in hundreds of languages in houses of worship of all shapes and sizes. Although many theological differences and various modes and manners of worship divide Christians, according to Fuller Seminary professor Clayton Schmit "there is a sense of solidarity in knowing that Christians around the globe are praying together, and these words always unite us. Two versions of it occur in the New Testament, one in the Gospel of Matthew 6:9–13 as part of the discourse on ostentation, a section of the Sermon on the Mount, and the other in the Gospel of Luke 11:2–4. The prayer's absence from the Gospel of Mark (cf. the Prayer for forgiveness of 11:25–26), taken together with its presence in both Luke and Matthew, has caused many scholars who accept the Q hypothesis (as opposed to Proto-Matthean theory) to conclude that it is a quotation from the Q document, especially because of the context in Luke's presentation of the prayer, where many phrases show similarity to the Q-like Gospel of Thomas. The context of the prayer in Matthew is as part of a discourse attacking people who pray simply for the purpose of being seen to pray. Matthew describes Jesus as instructing people to pray after the manner of this prayer. Taking into account the prayer's structure, flow of subject matter and emphases, many interpret the Lord's Prayer as a guideline on how to pray rather than something to be learned and repeated by rote. Some disagree, suggesting that the prayer was intended as a specific prayer to be used. The New Testament reports Jesus and the disciples praying on several occasions; but as it never describes them actually using this prayer, it is uncertain how important it was originally viewed as being. There are several different translations of the Lord's Prayer. One of the first texts in English is the Northumbrian translation from around 650. The three best-known in English speaking groups are The English translation in the 1662 Anglican Book of Common Prayer (BCP) The translation of the English Language Liturgical Consultation (ELLC), an ecumenical body The Latin version used in the Roman Catholic Church In three of the texts given below, the square brackets indicate the doxology with which the prayer is often concluded. This is not included in critical editions of the New Testament, such as that of the United Bible Societies, as not belonging to the original text of Matthew 6:9–13, nor is it always part of the Book of Common Prayer text. The Roman Catholic form of the Lord's Prayer never ends with it. Our Father, which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done, in earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; But deliver us from evil. For thine is the Kingdom, and The power, and the Glory, For ever. Amen. Variants of the 1662 BCP version (first column) are also in use. In the 1928 edition of the Church of England Prayer Book, "which" was changed to "who," "in earth" to "on earth," and "them that" to "those who" and this version is widely known. The Eastern Orthodox Churches also use a modified version of this form of the Our Father in their English services. Some non-Christian groups, such as religious science sometimes use the prayer also, often with modified wording, such as replacing the word "evil" with "error." Though Matthew 6:12 uses the term debts, the 1662 version of the Lord's Prayer uses the term trespasses, while ecumenical versions often use the term sins. The latter choice may be due to Luke 11:4, which uses the word sins, while the former may be due to Matthew 6:12 (immediately after the text of the prayer), where Jesus speaks of trespasses. As early as the third century, Origen used the word trespasses (παραπτώματα) in the prayer. Though the Latin form that was traditionally used in Western Europe has debita (debts), most English-speaking Christians (except Presbyterians and others of the Reformed tradition), use trespasses. The Established Presbyterian Church of Scotland follows the version found in Matthew 6 in the Authorized Version (known also as the King James Version), which in the prayer uses the words "debts" and "debtors." Roman Catholics usually do not add the doxology "For Thine is the kingdom, power, and glory, forever and ever." However, this doxology, in the form "For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and for ever," is used in the Catholic Mass, separated from the Lord's Prayer by a prayer, spoken or sung by the priest, that elaborates on the final petition, "Deliver us from evil." In the 1975 ICEL translation, this prayer reads: "Deliver us, Lord, from every evil, and grant us peace in our day. In your mercy keep us free from sin and protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope for the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ." All these versions are based on the text in Matthew, rather than Luke, of the prayer given by Jesus: Matthew 6:9–13 (KJV) After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. Luke 11:2–4 (KJV) And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in Heaven, so in earth. Give us day by day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. "Our Father, which art in Heaven" The opening pronoun of Matthew's version of the prayer—our—is plural, which is viewed by many as a strong indication that the prayer was intended for communal, rather than private, worship. Together, the first two words—Our Father—are a title used elsewhere in the New Testament, as well as in Jewish literature, to refer to God. This is most likely the intent of the prayer. "Hallowed be thy Name" Having opened, the prayer begins in the same manner as the Kaddish, hallowing the name of God, and then going on to express hope that God's will and kingdom will happen. In Judaism the name of God is of extreme importance, and honouring the name central to piety. In that era names were not simply labels, but were seen as true reflections of objects' nature. Therefore, when the prayer seeks to hallow God's name, it was seen as equivalent to actually hallowing God. Hallowed is the passive voice and future tense, which to some makes it unclear how this hallowing is meant to occur. One interpretation is that this is a call for all believers to honour God's name. Those who see the prayer as primarily eschatological understand the prayer to be an expression of desire for end times when God's name, in the eyes of those carrying out the prayer, would be universally honoured. "Thy kingdom come" The request for God's kingdom to come is usually interpreted as a reference to the belief, common at the time, that a Messiah figure would bring about a Kingdom of God. Some scholars have argued that this prayer is pre-Christian and was not designed for specifically Christian interpretation. Many evangelicals see it as quite the opposite—a command to spread Christianity. "Thy will be done, in earth as it is in Heaven" The prayer follows with an expression of hope for God's will to be done. This expressing of hope can be interpreted in different ways. Some see it as an addendum to assert a request for Earth to be under direct and manifest divine command. Others see it as a call on people to submit to God and his teachings. In the Gospels, these requests have the added clarification in earth, as it is in Heaven, an ambiguous phrase in Greek which can either be a simile (i.e., make earth like Heaven), or a couple (i.e., both in Heaven and earth), though simile is the most common interpretation. "Give us this day our daily bread" The more personal requests break from the similarity to the Kaddish. The first concerns daily bread. What this means is slightly obscure, since the word that is normally translated as daily—ἐπιούσιος epiousios—is almost a hapax legomenon, occurring only in Luke and Matthew's versions of the Lord's Prayer, and in an Egyptian accounting book, with no other surviving written citations. Daily bread appears to be a reference to the way God provided manna to the Israelites each day while they were in the wilderness, as in Exodus 16:15–21. Since they could not keep any manna overnight, they had to depend on God to provide anew each morning. Etymologically epiousios seems to be related to the Greek word ousia, meaning substance. Early heterodox writers connected this to Eucharistic transubstantiation. Modern scholars tend to reject this connection on the presumption that Eucharistic practise and the doctrine of transubstantiation both developed later than Matthew was written. Protestants concur since they reject belief in transubstantiation. Epiousios can also be understood as existence, i.e., bread that was fundamental to survival. In the era, bread was the most important food for survival. However, scholars of linguistics consider this rendering unlikely since it would violate standard rules of word formation. Koine Greek had several far more common terms for the same idea. The usage of epiousios in the Egyptian papyrus is in the sense of for tomorrow. That is more clearly stated in the wording used by the Gospel of the Nazoraeans for the prayer. Therefore, the common translation is daily, a translation conveniently close in meaning to the other two possibilities as well. Those Christians who read the Lord's Prayer as eschatological view epiousios as referring to the second coming—reading for tomorrow (and bread) in a metaphorical sense. Most scholars disagree, particularly since Jesus is portrayed throughout Luke and Matthew as caring for everyday needs for his followers, particularly in the bread-related miracles that are recounted. "And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us" After the request for bread, Matthew and Luke diverge slightly. Matthew continues with a request for debts to be forgiven in the same manner as people forgive those who have debts against them. Luke, on the other hand, makes a similar request about sins being forgiven in the manner of debts being forgiven between people. According to literal translation of the Greek, the debts are financial debts. However, in Aramaic, the word for debt can also mean sin. The difference between Luke and Matthew's wording could be explained by the prayer about which they were writing was originally written in Aramaic. It is generally accepted that the request is talking about forgiveness of sin, rather than merely loans. This is the traditional interpretation, although some groups read it literally as a condemnation of all forms of lending. Asking for forgiveness from God was a staple of Jewish prayers. It was also considered proper for individuals to be forgiving of others, thus requiring the sentiment expressed in the prayer would have been a common one of the time. "And lead us not into temptation" Interpretations of the penultimate petition of the prayer—not to be led by God into peirasmos—vary considerably. Peirasmos can mean temptation, or just test of character. Traditionally it has been translated temptation. Since this would seem to imply that God leads people to sin, individuals uncomfortable with that implication read it as test of character. There are generally two arguments for this reading. First, it may be an eschatological appeal against unfavourable last judgement, though nowhere in literature of the time, not even in the New Testament, is the term peirasmos connected to such an event. The other argument is that it acts as a plea against hard tests described elsewhere in scripture, such as those of Job. Yet, this would depart heavily from Jewish practice of the time when pleas were typically made, during prayer, to be put through such tests. "But deliver us from evil" Translations and scholars are divided over whether the evil mentioned in the final petition refers to evil in general or the devil in particular. The original Greek is quite vague. In earlier parts of the Sermon on the Mount, in which Matthew's version of the prayer appears, the term is used to refer to general evil. Later parts of Matthew refer to the devil when discussing similar issues. However, the devil is never referred to as the evil in any Aramaic sources. While John Calvin accepted the vagueness of the term's meaning, he considered there to be little real difference between the two interpretations, and therefore of no real consequence. "For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen" The doxology of the prayer is not contained in Luke's version, nor is it present in the earliest manuscripts of Matthew. The first known use of the doxology (in a less lengthy form) as a conclusion for the Lord's Prayer is in the Didache. In it are at least ten different versions among the early manuscripts before it seems to have standardized. Jewish prayers at the time had doxological endings. The doxology may have been originally appended for use during congregational worship. If so, it could be based on 1 Chronicles 29:11. Most scholars and many modern translations do not include the doxology except in footnotes. Nevertheless, it remains in use liturgically in Eastern Christianity and among Protestants. A minority, generally fundamentalists, posit that the doxology was so important that early editions neglected it due to its obviousness, though several other quite obvious things are mentioned in the Gospels. A map of European languages (1741) had the first verse of the Lord's Prayer put in every language. Since the publication of the Mithridates books, translations of the prayer have often been used for a quick comparison of languages, primarily because most earlier philologists were Christians, and very often priests. Due to missionary activity, one of the first texts to be translated between many languages has historically been the Bible, and so to early scholars the most readily available text in any particular language would most likely be a partial or total translation of the Bible. For example, the only extant text in Gothic, a language crucial in the history of Indo-European languages, is Codex Argenteus, the incomplete Bible translated by Wulfila. This tradition has been opposed recently from both the angle of religious neutrality and of practicality: the forms used in the Lord's Prayer (many commands) are not very representative of common discourse. Philologists and language enthusiasts have proposed other texts such as the Babel text (also part of the Bible) or the story of the North Wind and the Sun. In Soviet language sciences the complete works of Lenin were often used for comparison, as they were translated to most languages in the 20th century. Latin version The Latin version of this prayer has had cultural and historical importance for most regions where English is spoken. The text used in the liturgy (Mass, Liturgy of the Hours, etc.) differs slightly from that found in the Vulgate and probably pre-dates it. The doxology associated with the Lord's Prayer is found in four Vetus Latina manuscripts, only two of which give it in its entirety. The other surviving manuscripts of the Vetus Latina Gospels do not have the doxology. The Vulgate translation also does not include it, thus agreeing with critical editions of the Greek text. In the Latin Rite liturgies, this doxology is never attached to the Lord's Prayer. Its only use in the Roman Rite liturgy is in the Mass as revised after the Second Vatican Council. It is there placed not immediately after the Lord's Prayer, but instead after the priest's prayer, Libera nos, quaesumus..., elaborating on the final petition, Libera nos a malo (Deliver us from evil). Relation to Jewish prayer There are similarities between the Lord's Prayer and both Biblical and post-Biblical material in Jewish prayer. "Hallowed be thy name" is reflected in the Kaddish. "Lead us not into sin" is echoed in the "morning blessings" of Jewish prayer. A blessing said by some Jewish communities after the evening Shema includes a phrase quite similar to the opening of the Lord's Prayer: "Our God in heaven, hallow thy name, and establish thy kingdom forever, and rule over us for ever and ever". Malotte graduated from Tioga High School and sang at Saint James Episcopal Church in Philadelphia as a choir boy. He studied with Victor Herbert, W. S. Stansfield, and later in Paris with Gordon Jacob. His career as an organist began in Chicago where he played for silent pictures and later concertized throughout the US and Europe. During World War II he held the rank of Captain in the Special Services for two years while he toured with the USO and entertained troops in New Guinea, Australia and Europe. At one point he sponsored his own troup of entertainers that included Judith Anderson, Ann Triola and Helen McClure Preister. Malotte was an amateur pilot, avid golfer and even boxed with Jack Dempsey in Memphis, Tennessee. He spent most of his career as a composer in Hollywood. Malotte composed a number of film scores, including mostly uncredited music for animations from the Disney studios. Although two movies for which he composed scores won best Short Subject Academy Awards (Ferdinand the Bull in 1939 and The Ugly Duckling in 1940), he is best remembered for a setting of the Lord's Prayer. Written in 1935, it was recorded by the baritone John Charles Thomas, and remained highly popular for use as a solo in churches and at weddings in the US for some decades. He composed a number of other religious pieces, including settings of the Beatitudes and of the Twenty-third Psalm which have also remained popular as solos. His secular songs, such as "Ferdinand the bull" (from the Disney animated short of the same name), "For my mother" (a setting of a poem by 12-year-old Bobby Sutherland) and "I am proud to be an American" are less well remembered. Some of his works are collected in the library of the University of California Los Angeles and the Library of Congress. In addition, Malotte wrote uncredited stock music for many other films in the 1930s and early 1940s, including twenty-two of the Disney Silly Symphonies and other shorts such Little Hiawatha as well as Ferdinand the Bull. He also composed cantatas, oratorios, musicals and ballets. Malotte owned Apple Valley Music. Tags: Almighty God pray praying religion religious Christian Christians Christianity love hereafter paradise theology theological Jesus spiritual spirituality faith catholic Catholicism Anglican belief believe believing croyance croire Jesus Christ spiritual spirituality Theology Mario Lanza song vocal Gospel praise the Lord Albert Hay Malotte The Lord's Prayer Christian God Jesus pray theology religious Mario Lanza Syr Maestro Sir Reginald Mother Teresa Vatican Pope popes Benedict XVI Benoît XVI Benedictus XVI John Paul II Jean-Paul II Jean Paul II missionary missionaries of Charity missionaire missionnaire de la charité chrétien chrétiens chrétienne chrétiennes chrétienté résurrection âme soul Seele Seele élévation de l’âme Padre nostro fede religione religioso Vaticano God Lord Jesus Christ pray religion religious Christian Christians theology theological spiritual spirituality faithCatholic Prayer God Lord Christians Power Mother Teresa Mère Teresa Theresa Calcutta music musical opera operatic chant cantique cantical lyrique recueillement adoration choeur chorus vocal voce bel canto melody melodie melodia Saint ST holy holiness blessing blessings bless blessed benediction benedictions benedetto benedetta benedizione heilig Heiligkeit transcend transcendance
21 Jun 2007
25593
Share Video

3:29
Une vidéo inédite - car jamais publiée auparavant – de la mezzo-soprano Fleurange BELLOMO SALOMONE, interprétant ici un célèbre air virtuose, issu du génie musical propre au magistral compositeur autrichien Wolfgang Amadeus MOZART : "Esultate jubilate" (d’ordinaire interprété par une voix de soprano), lors d’un concert qu’elle a partagé - en duo - avec l'une des plus belles voix mondiales actuelles de l'opéra, le célèbre baryton-basse italien : Michele PERTUSI. Enregistré en Live (avec le consentement et l’approbation de l’artiste), lors d'un concert exceptionnel, donné à l'opéra de Lausanne CH (Suisse), en date du 30 mai 2006, sous les auspices électifs de "Pro Arte Lyrica-Les Amis de l'Opéra-Lausanne". Orchestre "Parma Opera Ensemble" Chanté en latin. This is quite a new video, which was never issued before, which content is related to Fleurange BELLOMO SALOMONE, mezzo soprano, who sings quite a famous aria by Wolfgang Amadeus MOZART, during a concert she was lucky to perform with one of the most gorgeous voice of our times, in the person of one of the current most famous bass-baritone, wearing the name of Michele PERTUSI. Recorded and filmed in Lausanne CH (Switzerland), on May 30, 2006, at the "Opéra de Lausanne", under the auspices of "Pro Arte Lyrica-Les Amis de l'Opéra-Lausanne". Fleurange BELLOMO SALOMONE – biography : Née à Lausanne, Fleurange BELLOMO SALOMONE obtient la maturité fédérale en 1997. Après avoir étudié le piano, elle découvre sa prédisposition pour l’art vocal et entreprend des études de chant auprès du contralto espagnol Carmen Gonzalez, qui lui transmet l’héritage de l’enseignement belcantiste de Rodolfo Celletti de Milan. De plus elle bénéficie ponctuellement des conseils et des encouragements de deux grands mezzo-soprani de l’histoire de l’Art Lyrique, Teresa Berganza et Christa Ludwig. Toutefois, c’est actuellement Teresa Berganza qui la suit et la prépare pour tous les concerts et récitals importants en lui transmettant tout son savoir technique et d’interprétation. Fleurange Bellomo Salomone a obtenu en 2002 le diplôme de médecin-dentiste et, très prochainement, son doctorat. Elle exerce sa profession à l’Université de Genève et dans le cabinet de son père à Lausanne. Parallèlement elle poursuit sa carrière artistique qu’elle consacre essentiellement au répertoire traditionnel du « récital classique » avec les airs antiques italiens, Lieder, mélodies françaises, espagnoles et russes. Elle ne néglige pas pour autant le répertoire de l’opéra, interprétant en concert les rôles mozartiens et rossiniens. Son important acquis musical lui a permis de donner nombreux récitals et concerts en Suisse et à l’étranger. Accompagnée au piano par son frère Stéphane BELLOMO SALOMONE, elle a enregistré un CD de Lieder et mélodies pour la Radio Suisse Romande. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Esultate Jubilate latin Parma Opera Ensemble Fleurange BELLOMO SALOMONE mezzo-soprano mezzo soprano vocalise vocalises vocalize vocalizing voix voice vocal voce sing singing opera operatic chant lyrique canto lirico prouesse vocale prouesses vocales vocal vocals vocaux role air d’opéra roles airs d’opéra aria arias live concert musique classique musiques classique musica classica classi music musics performance Lausanne Switzerland CH Suisse Svizzera Schweiz Opéra de Lausanne Lausanne Opera House vocals répertoire émission projection vocale phonation phonatoire larynx laryngé Live performance Concert Récital bel canto belcantiste belcantistes cantare cantante Opern Sänger Singen Orchestra orchestre Parma Opera Ensemble arte lirico mélodie melody melodia Pro Arte Lyrica-Les Amis de l'Opéra-Lausanne Dr Dominique Domenico Bellomo Mimmo Autriche autrichien autrichiens autrichiennes Õstereich Austria Salzbourg
25 Jun 2007
5876
Share Video

1:25
This is an old video archive of a live operatic performance, which occurred in Brou (France) on July, 1989 (hence poor image & sound quality). Dialogues of the Carmelites (in French, Dialogues des Carmélites) is an opera in three acts by Francis Poulenc. In 1953, M. Valcarenghi approached Poulenc to commission a ballet for La Scala in Milan; when Poulenc found the proposed subject uninspiring, Valcarenghi suggested instead the screenplay by Georges Bernanos, based on the novella Die Letzte am Schafott (The Last on the Scaffold), by Gertrud von le Fort. Von le Fort's story was based in turn on historical events which took place at a Carmelite convent in Compiègne during the French Revolution. Some sources credit Emmet Lavery as librettist or co-librettist, but others only say "With the permission of Emmet Lavery." According to the article by Ivry, cited below, Lavery owned the theatrical rights to the story, and following a legal judgement over the copyright, his name must be given in connection with all staged performances. The opera was first performed in an Italian version at la Scala on 26 January 1957; the original French version premiered 21 June 1957 by the Paris Théâtre National de l'Opéra (the current Opéra National de Paris). The Dialogues contributes to Poulenc's reputation as a composer especially of fine vocal music. The dialogues are largely set in recitative, with a melodic line that closely follows the text. The harmonies are lush, with the occasional wrenching twists that are characteristic of Poulenc's style. Poulenc's deep religious feelings are particularly evident in the gorgeous a cappella setting of Ave Maria in Act II, Scene II, and the Ave verum corpus in Act II, Scene IV. The libretto is unusually deep in its psychological study of the contrasting characters of Mère Marie de l'Incarnation and Blanche de la Force. The popularity of the Dialogues of the Carmelites appears to be growing. Two television productions are available on DVD. The original recording with Pierre Dervaux conducting is considered by some to be the finest audio version. The opera has recently been performed by Trinity College of Music, London, under the direction of Bill Bankes-Jones. Roles Role Vocal type Milan premiere, 26 January, 1957 Paris premiere, 21 June, 1957 - Marquis de la Force baritone Scipio Colombo Xavier Depraz - Chevalier de la Force, his son tenor Nicola Filacuridi Jean Giraudeau - Blanche de la Force, his daughter soprano Virginia Zeani Denise Duval - Thierry, a footman baritone Armando Manelli Forel - Madame de Croissy, the prioress contralto Gianna Pederzini Denise Scharley - Sister Constance of St. Denis, a young novice soprano Eugenia Ratti Liliane Berthon - Mother Marie of the Incarnation, assistant prioress mezzo-soprano Gigliola Frazzoni Rita Gorr - M. Javelinot, a doctor baritone Carlo Gasperini Max Conti - Madame Lidoine, the new prioress soprano Leyla Gencer Régine Crespin - Mother Jeanne of the Child Jesus contralto Vittoria Palombini Fourrier - Sister Mathilde mezzo-soprano Fiorenza Cossoto Desmoutiers - Father confessor of the convent tenor Alvino Manelli Forel - First commissary tenor Antonio Pirino Romagnoni - Second commissary baritone - Officer baritone - Geolier baritone - Carmelites, Officers, Prisoners, Townspeople chorus Plot synopsis The action takes place during the French Revolution and subsequent Terror. Act I. The pathologically timid Blanche de la Force decides to retreat from the world and enter a Carmelite convent. The Mother Superior informs her that the Carmelite order is not a refuge: it is the duty of the nuns to guard the Order, not the other way around. In the convent, the jolly Sister Constance tells Blanche (to her consternation) that she has had a dream that the two of them will die young together. The Mother Superior, who is dying, commits Blanche to the care of Mother Marie. The Mother Superior passes away in great agony, shouting in her delirium that despite her long years of service to God, He has abandoned her. Blanche and Mother Marie, who witness her death, are shaken. Act II. Sister Constance remarks to Blanche that the Mother Superior's death seemed unworthy of her, and speculates that she had been given the wrong death, as one might be given the wrong coat in a cloakroom. Perhaps someone else will find death surprisingly easy. Perhaps we die not for ourselves alone, but for each other. Blanche's brother, the Chevalier de la Force, arrives to announce that their father thinks Blanche should withdraw from the convent, since she is not safe there (being a member of both the nobility and the clergy). Blanche refuses, saying that she has found happiness in the Carmelite order, but later admits to Mother Marie that it is fear (or the fear of fear itself, as the Chevalier expresses it) that keeps her from leaving. The chaplain announces that he has been forbidden to preach (presumably for being a non-juror under the Civil Constitution of the Clergy). The nuns remark on how fear now governs the country, and no one has the courage to stand up for the priests. Sister Constance asks, "Are there no men left to come to the aid of the country?" "When priests are lacking, martyrs are superabundant," replies the new Mother Superior. Mother Marie says that the Carmelites can save France by giving their lives, but the Mother Superior corrects her: it is not permitted to become a martyr voluntarily; martyrdom is a gift from God. A police officer announces that the Legislative Assembly has nationalized the convent and its property, and the nuns must give up their habits. When Mother Marie acquiesces, the officer taunts her for being eager to dress like everyone else. She replies that the nuns will continue to serve, no matter how they are dressed. "The people has no need of servants," proclaims the officer haughtily. "No, but it has a great need for martyrs," responds Mother Marie. "In times like these, death is nothing," he says. "Life is nothing," she answers, "when it is so debased." Act III. In the absence of the new Mother Superior, Mother Marie proposes that the nuns take a vow of martyrdom. However, all must agree, or Mother Marie will not insist. A secret vote is held; there is one dissenting voice. Sister Constance declares that she was the dissenter, and that she has changed her mind, so the vow can proceed. Blanche runs away from the convent, and Mother Marie finds her in her father's library. Her father has been guillotined, and Blanche has been forced to serve her former servants. The nuns are all arrested and condemned to death, but Mother Marie is away (with Blanche, presumably) at the time. The chaplain tells Mother Marie that since God has chosen to spare her, she cannot now voluntarily become a martyr by joining the others in prison. The nuns march to the scaffold, singing Salve Regina. At the last minute, Blanche appears, to Constance's joy; but as she mounts the scaffold, Blanche changes the hymn to Deo patri sit gloria (All praise be thine, O risen Lord). References and external links Carmel's Heights - This CD album is an attempt to share with all some of Carmel's Saints - real persons of flesh and blood - who share with us in song their own spiritual experiences. Cries from the Scaffold, Benjamin Ivry, Commonweal, 6 April 2001. Dialogues des Carmélites, Henri Hell, liner notes to the recording EMI compact disc no. 7493312. Les Dialogues des Carmélites est un opéra en trois actes composé par Francis Poulenc (1899-1963), sur un livret d'Emmet Lavery, basé sur la pièce de Georges Bernanos (1888-1948). Cet opéra fut créé le 26 janvier 1957, à la Scala de Milan. Personnages - Le marquis de La Force (Baryton) - Le chevalier de La Force, son fils (Ténor) - Blanche de La Force (Soeur Blanche de l'Agonie du Christ), sa fille (Soprano) - Thierry, un laquais (Baryton) - Mme de Croissy (Mère Henriette de Jésus), la prieure (Contralto) - Soeur Constance de Saint Denis, jeune novice (Soprano) - Mère Marie de l'Incarnation, sous-prieure (Mezzo-soprano) - M. Javelinot, médecin (Baryton) - Mme Lidoine (Mère Marie de Saint Augustin), la nouvelle prieure (Soprano) - Mère Jeanne de l'Enfant Jésus (Contralto) - Soeur Mathilde (Mezzo-soprano) - Le père confesseur du couvent (Ténor) - Le premier commissaire (Ténor) - Le second commissaire (Baryton) - Officier, geôlier, Carmélites Francis Poulenc, né le 7 janvier 1899 à Paris, mort le 30 janvier 1963 à Paris, est un compositeur français, membre du groupe des Six. Biographie Son père est un des fondateurs des établissements Poulenc Frères, qui devinrent Rhône-Poulenc. Bien qu'il ait suivi quelques cours de composition avec Charles Koechlin, Poulenc est considéré comme un compositeur autodidacte. Après une scolarité au lycée Condorcet, il connaît à dix-huit ans une première réussite avec une Rapsodie nègre. Avec la Première Guerre mondiale, sa production n'est guère importante. Il compose cependant Le Bestiaire, un cycle de mélodies. Ricardo Vinès lui fait rencontrer notamment Isaac Albéniz, Claude Debussy et Maurice Ravel. Poulenc fait partie, avec Georges Auric, Louis Durey, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud et Germaine Tailleferre du groupe informel de musiciens que le critique Henri Collet surnommera en 1920 le Groupe des Six, en référence au Groupe des Cinq russe (Moussorgski, Cui, Balakirev, Borodine, Rimski-Korsakov). Leur esthétique commune, influencée par Satie et Cocteau, est une réaction contre le romantisme et le wagnérisme, et aussi, dans une certaine mesure, contre le courant impressionniste. En 1926, il rencontre le baryton Pierre Bernac pour lequel il compose un grand nombre de mélodies. Il l'accompagne, à partir de 1935 (et jusqu'à sa mort en 1963), dans des récitals de musique française donnés autour du monde. En 1928, le compositeur écrit Le Concert champêtre, oeuvre pour clavecin et orchestre destinée à la grande claveciniste Wanda Landowska et dédié à son compagnon, le peintre Richard Chanelaire. En 1935, de passage à Rocamadour et consécutivement à la mort accidentelle de son ami, le compositeur et critique Pierre-Octave Ferroud, il vit un profond retour à la foi catholique de son enfance. Le critique Claude Rostand, pour souligner la coexistence ou l'alternance chez Poulenc d'une grande gravité et de la foi catholique avec l'insouciance et la fantaisie, a forgé la formule célèbre "moine ou voyou". Ainsi, à propos de son Gloria, qui provoqua quelques remous, le compositeur lui-même déclara : « J’ai pensé, simplement, en l’écrivant à ces fresques de Gozzoli (Benozzo Gozzoli) où les anges tirent la langue, et aussi à ces graves bénédictins que j’ai vus un jour jouer au football ». Il compose ses Litanies à la Vierge noire de Rocamadour, pour choeur de femmes et orgue (qu'il orchestrera ultérieurement), en 1936. Ses oeuvres religieuses par la suite furent notamment une messe (1937), un Stabat Mater (1950) et un Gloria (1959). Le compositeur écrira aussi son fameux Les Dialogues des Carmélites en 1957. Il a laissé plusieurs enregistrements comme pianiste soliste ou accompagnateur. On dispose aussi d'enregistrements parfois supervisés par lui et interprétés par des artistes qu'il privilégiait de son vivant, comme le baryton Pierre Bernac, la soprano Denise Duval ou le chef d'orchestre Georges Prêtre. Il est enterré au cimetière du Père Lachaise à Paris. Georges Bernanos Georges Bernanos est un écrivain français né le 20 février 1888 à Paris, décédé le 5 juillet 1948 à Neuilly-sur-Seine et est enterré dans le cimetière de Pellevoisin. Il passe sa jeunesse à Fressin en Artois où il compose jusqu'en 1924 ses romans. Choqué par les reculades du Royaume-Uni et de la France culminant au moment des accords de Munich, il s'exile au Brésil. Il meurt en laissant le manuscrit d'un dernier livre, posthume : La France contre les robots. Parcours Son père est un artisan et sa mère, pieuse, femme de chambre chez le châtelain. Il garde de son éducation une foi catholique et des convictions monarchistes, et concevra toute sa vie une admiration sans faille pour le fondateur du journal La Libre parole, Edouard Drumont. Premiers engagements Catholique fervent, nationaliste passionné, il milite très jeune dans les rangs de l'Action française en participant aux activités des Camelots du roi pendant ses études de lettres, puis à la tête du journal, L'Avant-Garde de Normandie jusqu'à la Grande guerre. Réformé, il décide tout même de participer à la guerre en se portant volontaire dans le 6e regiment de dragons (cavalerie) ; il aura de nombreuses blessures au champ d'honneur. Après la guerre, il s'éloigne d'une activité militante, mais se rapproche de nouveau de l'Action Française lors de la condamnation romaine de 1926 et participe à certaines de ses activités culturelles. En 1932, sa collaboration au Figaro du parfumeur François Coty entraîne une violente polémique avec l'AF et sa rupture avec Charles Maurras. Premières oeuvres Dans les années 1920, il travaille dans une compagnie d'assurances, mais le succès de son premier roman, Sous le soleil de Satan (1926), l'incite à entrer dans la carrière littéraire. Ayant épousé en 1917 Jeanne Talbert d'Arc, lointaine descendante d'un frère de Jeanne d'Arc, il mène alors une vie matérielle difficile et instable dans laquelle il entraîne sa famille de six enfants et son épouse à la santé fragile. Il écrit en dix ans l'essentiel de son oeuvre romanesque où s'expriment ses hantises : les péchés de l'humanité, la puissance du malin et le secours de la grâce. Le Journal d'un curé de campagne En 1936, paraît Le Journal d'un curé de campagne, qui sera couronné par le Grand prix du roman de l'Académie française, puis adapté au cinéma sous le même titre par Robert Bresson (1950). Ce livre est sans aucun doute porteur d'une double spiritualité : celle du Curé d'Ars et celle de sainte Thérèse de l'Enfant Jésus, tous deux portés sur les autels par Pie XI en 1925. Comme Jean-Marie Vianney, notre jeune prêtre est ici dévoré par son zèle apostolique, consacré qu'il est à la sanctification du troupeau qui lui a été confié. De Thérèse, il suit la petite voie de l'enfance spirituelle. Le "Tout est grâce" final du roman n'est d'ailleurs pas de Bernanos lui-même, mais de sa prestigieuse aînée. L'exil aux Baléares, puis au Brésil Installé aux Baléares, il assiste au début de la guerre d'Espagne et prend parti pour, puis contre les franquistes dans Les Grands Cimetières sous la Lune, un pamphlet qui consacre sa rupture publique avec ses anciens amis de l'Action française, sa rupture avec Maurras -datant de 1927- étant restée secrète jusque-là. Il y condamne les exactions et les massacres perpétrés par les phalangistes au nom du Christ, mais aussi le soutien apporté aux nationalistes espagnols par Maurras et l'Action française. Il quitte l'Espagne en mars 1937 et retourne en France. Le 20 juillet 1938 il choisit de s'exiler en Amérique du sud. Il prévoit initialement de se rendre au Paraguay. Il fait escale à Rio de Janeiro au Brésil ( [1] ) en Août 1938. Il décide d'y rester et y demeurera de 1938 à 1945. En Août 1940 il s'installera à Barbacena, dans une petite maison au flanc d'une colline dénommée Cruz das almas, la Croix-des-âmes. Il s'éloigne alors du roman et publie de nombreux essais et "écrits de combat" dans lesquels l'influence de Péguy se fait sentir. En 1939 ses trois fils reviennent du Brésil pour être incorporés dans l'armée française. Pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale il soutient la Résistance et l'action de la France libre dans de nombreux articles de presse où éclate son talent de polémiste et de pamphlétaire. La Libération Il poursuit une vie errante après la Libération. Le général de Gaulle l'invite à revenir en France, où il veut le placer y compris au gouvernement ou à l'Académie. Bernanos revient, mais malade et n'ayant pas l'échine souple, reste en marge avant de se fixer en Tunisie. Bernanos rédige quelque temps avant sa mort un scénario cinématographique adapté du récit La dernière à l'échafaud de Gertrud von Le Fort, lui-même inspiré de l'histoire véridique de carmélites guillotinées sur la place du Trône, appelées les Carmélites de Compiègne, en y ajoutant le personnage fictif de Blanche de La Force (translittération de G. von Le Fort). Ce scénario, intitulé Les Dialogues des Carmélites est devenu le livret de l'opéra du même nom du compositeur Francis Poulenc, créé en 1957, puis a servi de base au film du Père Bruckberger, en 1960. Il a aussi été adapté au théâtre. Bernanos y traite de la question de la Grâce, de la peur, du martyre. L'oeuvre Le monde romanesque Bernanos situe souvent l'action de ses romans dans les villages de son Artois natal, en en faisant ressortir les traits sombres. La figure du prêtre catholique est très présente dans son oeuvre, et est parfois le personnage central, comme dans Le Journal d'un curé de campagne. Autour de lui gravitent les notables locaux (châtelains nobles ou bourgeois), les petits commerçants, et les paysans. Bernanos fouille la psychologie de ses personnages et fait ressortir leur âme en tant que siège du combat entre le Bien et le Mal. Il n'hésite pas à faire parfois appel au divin et au surnaturel. Jamais de réelle diabolisation chez lui, mais au contraire, comme chez Mauriac, un souci de comprendre ce qui se passe dans l'âme humaine derrière les apparences. Le style pamphlétaire Aussi isolé - en tout cas en France - qu'un Don Quichotte, il avait dénoncé les trahisons aussi bien dans le sens autoritaire et agricole de l'État français que la technique dans ce qu'elle avait de liberticide. Ses essais traduisent par ailleurs un goût de l'amour physique et conjugal qu'on ne reverra ensuite que chez Jacques de Bourbon Busset. Le mot Imbéciles (au pluriel) revient souvent sous la plume de Bernanos dans ses essais. Par cette injure fraternelle, il manifestait sa « pitié » pour « les petits cancres de la nouvelle génération réaliste » (les néo-maurrassiens des années 1930), et, plus tard, pour « les affreux cuistres bourgeois de gauche » (les communistes et les démocrates-chrétiens), mais aussi pour tous ceux chez qui la propagande des médias, le manque de courage personnel et la manipulation par des abstractions excessives avaient fini par remplacer l'expérience humaine réelle et concrète. Son style ne peut être qualifié de « parlé », bien qu'il s'adresse souvent à un lecteur imaginaire. Ample et passionné (ses pages sur le Brésil ou sur Hitler ne peuvent laisser indifférent), sa lecture nécessite toutefois une profonde connaissance de l'histoire de France. Sur la question de l'antisémitisme, il est essentiel de ne pas se contenter de lire les textes de combat publiés essentiellement dans les années 1930 qui peuvent choquer, mais de lire l'étonnante lettre qu'il écrit en 1945 à ce sujet, dans laquelle on trouve la fameuse phrase : "Hitler a déshonoré l'antisémitisme". Bernanos reste attaché à un style antisémite qui lui vient des années de l'affaire Dreyfus et, en particulier, d'Édouard Drumont dont il retrace la vie dans La Grande peur des bien-pensants. Citations "L'optimisme est une fausse espérance à l'usage des lâches et des imbéciles. L'espérance, est une vertu, virtus, une détermination héroïque de l'âme. La plus haute forme de l'espérance, c'est le désespoir surmonté". "Être d'avant garde c'est savoir ce qui est mort; etre d'arrière garde c'est l'aimer encore". "On n'attend pas l'avenir comme on attend un train: on le fait". "Qu'un niais s'étonne du brusque essor d'une volonté longtemps contenue, qu'une dissimulation nécessaire, à peine consciente, à déjà marqué de cruauté, revanche ineffable du faible, éternelle surprise du fort, et piège toujours tendu!" (Histoire de Mouchette) "Les sentiments les plus simples naissent et croissent dans une nuit jamais pénetrée, s'y confondent ou s'y repoussent selon de secrètes affinités, pareils à des nuages électriques, et nous ne saisissons à la surface des ténèbres que les brèves lueurs de l'orage inaccessible." (Histoire de Mouchette) "Il n'y a de vraiment précieux dans la vie que le rare et le singulier, la minute d'attente et le pressentiment." (Sous le soleil de Satan) "Quand un homme -ou un peuple- a engagé sa parole, il doit la tenir, quel que soit celui auquel il l'a engagée." (Préface "'Journal d'un curé de campagne'") "C'est que notre joie intérieure ne nous appartient pas plus que l'oeuvre qu'elle anime, il faut que nous la donnions à mesure, que nous mourions vides, que nous mourions comme des nouveau-nés (...) avant de se réveiller, le seuil franchi, dans la douce pitié de Dieu, comme dans une aube fraîche et profonde." (Ibid) "Pour moi, le passé ne compte pas. Le présent non plus d'ailleurs, ou comme une petite frange d'ombre, à la lisière de l'avenir." ( "Monsieur Ouine") "Ah! c'était bien là l'image que j'ai caressé tant d'années, une vie, une jeune vie humaine, tout ignorance et tout audace, la part réelement périssable de l'univers, seule promesse qui ne sera jamais tenue, merveille unique! (...) Une vraie jeunesse est aussi rare que le génie, ou peut-être ce génie même un défi à l'oredre du monde, à ses lois, un blasphème!" ("Monsieur Ouine") "Il n'y a pas de pente dans la vie d'un gosse" ("Monsieur Ouine") "-Moi, je me méfie. D'une manière ou d'une autre, monsieur Ouine, je me méfie de Dieu -telle est ma façon de l'honorer." ("Monsieur Ouine") "Souffrir, croyez-moi, cela s'apprend." ("Monsieur Ouine") "Quand je mesure le temps que nous avons perdu à chercher des héros dans nos livres, j'ai envie de nous battre, Guillaume. Chaque génération devrait avoir ses héros bien à elle, des héros bien à elle, des héros selon son coeur. On ne nous a peut-être pas jugés dignes d'en avoir des neufs, on nous repasse ceux qui ont déjà servi." ("Monsieur Ouine") Oeuvres Romans Sous le soleil de Satan, Paris, Plon, 1926. L'imposture, Paris, Plon, 1927. La joie, la Revue universelle, 1928, puis, Paris Plon, 1929. Un crime, Paris, Plon, 1935. Journal d'un curé de campagne, la Revue hebdomadaire, 1935-1936, puis, Paris, Plon, 1936. Nouvelle Histoire de Mouchette, Paris, Plon, 1937. Monsieur Ouine, Rio de Janeiro, 1943, puis Paris, Plon, 1946. Les Dialogues des Carmélites, Paris, Seuil, 1949. Un mauvais rêve, Paris, Plon, 1950. Essais La Grande peur des bien-pensants, Paris, Grasset, 1931. Les Grands Cimetières sous la Lune, Paris, Plon, 1938. Scandale de la vérité, Gallimard, Paris, 1939. La France contre les robots, Rio de Janeiro, 1944, puis Robert Laffont, 1947. Le Chemin de la Croix-des-Âmes, Rio de Janeiro de 1943 à 1945, 4 volumes, puis Gallimard, 1948. Les Enfants humiliés, Gallimard, 1949. Recueils d'articles Français, si vous saviez... (Recueil d'articles écrits entre 1945 et 1948), Paris, Gallimard, 1961. Etudes sur Bernanos Biographie Jean Bothorel, Bernanos, le Mal pensant, Paris, Grasset, 1998. Joseph Jurt, « [Georges Bernanos] Une parole prophétique dans le champ littéraire », dans Europe, n°789-790, janvier – février 1995, p. 75-88. Joseph Jurt, Les attitudes politiques de Georges Bernanos jusqu'en 1931, Fribourg, Éditions Universitaires, 1968, 359 p. Bibliographie Hans Urs von Balthasar. Le chrétien Bernanos. Traduit de l’allemand par Maurice de Gandillac. Paris, Seuil, 1956. Jean de Fabrègues, Bernanos tel qu'il était, Paris, Mame, 1962 Jean-Louis Loubet del Bayle, L'illusion politique au XXe siècle. Des écrivains témoins au XXe siècle, Paris, Economica, 1999. Cahiers de l'Herne. Bernanos. Paris, Pierre Belfond, 1967. Cahier dirigé par Dominique de Roux, avec des textes de Thomas Molnar, Michel Estève (et al). Georges Bernanos au Brésil: 1938-1945 “ Le plus grand, le plus profond, le plus douloureux désir de mon coeur en ce qui me regarde c’est de vous revoir tous, de revoir votre pays, de reposer dans cette terre où j’ai tant souffert et tant espéré pour la France, d’y attendre la résurrection, comme j’y ai attendu la victoire. ” Musée Georges Bernanos à Barbacena, État de Minas Gerais, Brésil *******www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/label_france/FRANCE/LETTRES/bernanos/bernanos.html *******agora.qc.ca/mot.nsf/Dossiers/Georges_Bernanos Opéra opéras operatic chant lyrique chant lyriques bel canto belcantiste belcantistes Francis Poulenc France mélodie française mélodies françaises larynx laryngé laryngés français Dialogues des Carmélites Dialogues of the Carmelites entrer en religion religions catholique catholic Catholicism catholicisme catolico catolica prêtre prêtres parish priest priests pastoral Pasteur pasteurs devotion prière prayer priers latin latins latine latines cérémonie religieuse ceremonies religieuses ritual religieux rituels religious ritual rituals religious sacrifice sacrifices don de soi dons de soi mere supérieure mères supérieures superior mother mothers monastère monastères monastery recluse recluse recluses reclusion spirituelle reclusions spirituelles retraite retraites spiritual spirituals spiritualité spiritualités reverend reverends cure cures abbé abbes confesseur confesseurs confession confessions confessionnal confessionnaux serment éternel serments éternels obédience obédiences obéissance obéissances sacré sacrés sacrée sacrées sacrement sacrements sacramentel sacramentels sacred eternity syr eternities éternel éternels éternelle éternelles alleluia amen ainsi soit-il messe messes bénédiction bénédictions bénir béni bénis bénies bless blessed blessing blessings nonne nonnes nun nuns latin priest priests messe mass masses bénédictin bénédictins bénédictine bénédictines blessing oracle oracles cérémonieux cérémoniel cérémoniels cérémonial cérémoniaux vœu vœux de chasteté chasteté chastetés coeur cœurs de Jesus Christ Jésus-Christ Dieu Lord God Almighty Eternal église églises church churches sacristie sacristies sacristin sacristins sacristine sacristines prêtrise prêtrises sacerdoce sacerdoces sacerdotal sacerdotales sacerdotaux apostolat apostolats apostolique apostoliques apostolicum
29 Jun 2007
8911
Share Video

3:35
Agée seulement de 25 ans, Kyana est une artiste complète au parcours déjà bien étoilé. Auteur-compositeur-interprète elle débute à l’âge de 9 ans le chant classique et lyrique et intègre l’école de « Maîtrise Vocale » où elle deviendra très rapidement membre de la fédération des « Pueri Cantores ». Elle parcourt l’Europe pour une centaine de dates, en tant que soliste, avec cette même formation. A l’âge de 14 ans, Kyana accompagne Barbara Hendrix pour un concert exceptionnel donné en l’honneur des enfants de Sarajevo au Zénith de Paris Influencée depuis son plus jeune âge par le mélange de la Pop , du rock et de la Musique classique, elle s’épanouit dans l’univers de Queen et de Björk. Elle s'est fait connaître grâce au site Hitmuse. Retrouvez la sur : *******kyana.hitmuse****/
13 Apr 2008
1241
Share Video

2:06
*******www.restovisio****/restaurant/67-Belcanto-Neuilly.htm Chaque soir au Belcanto l'Opera s'invite a votre table.Un quatuor de jeunes chanteurs lyriques(soprano,mezzo-soprano,tenor et baryton) accompagné au piano participe au service en interpretant les grands airs de l'Opera. Verdi,Mozart,Puccini,Rossini passent de tables en tables. La proximite des voix crée une veritable emotion. Ce concept unique en France allié a une cuisine savoureuse vous fera passer une soirée inoubliable. Téléphone : 01 79 97 31 55 *******www.restovisio**** Restovisio est un guide proposant à ses internautes, un ensemble de restaurants situés à Paris. A la différence des autres, RestoVisio met en avant une vidéo faisant figurer l'activité, le décor et le plat de ses restaurateurs. Grâce à ce support média, les internautes précisent ainsi leurs recherches de restaurant avant de s'y rendre.
16 Oct 2009
1008
Share Video

1:35
*******www.restovisio****/restaurant/71-Belcanto-Hotel-de-Ville.htm Au Belcanto, l'Opera s'invite a votre table. Chaque soir un quatuor de jeunes chanteurs lyriques (soprano, mezzo- soprano, tenor et baryton) accompagné au piano, participe au service du restaurant en interpretant les grands airs de l'Opera. Verdi, Mozart, Puccini, Rossini passent de tables en tables. La proximité des voix crée une veritable émotion. Ce concept unique en France allié a une cuisine savoureuse vous fera passer une soirée inoubliable. Téléphone : 01 79 97 32 19 *******www.restovisio**** Restovisio est un guide proposant à ses internautes, un ensemble de restaurants situés à Paris. A la différence des autres, RestoVisio met en avant une vidéo faisant figurer l'activité, le décor et le plat de ses restaurateurs. Grâce à ce support média, les internautes précisent ainsi leurs recherches de restaurant avant de s'y rendre.
26 Oct 2009
1420
Share Video

1:23
Lucrèce, tueuse professionnelle en quête d'une nouvelle vie, doit faire disparaître un chanteur lyrique qui menace les intérêts d'une multinationale. Elle est engagée comme soprano pour un spectacle dans un château suisse auquel sa cible doit participer, mais sur place, elle ne peut se résoudre à remplir son contrat... Alors que le concert s'approche, elle apprend finalement qu'un deuxième tueur est sur place, et qu'elle est la deuxième cible...
23 Feb 2011
1230
Share Video

1:07
Malika OUATTARA, plus connu par son auditoire sous le nom Malika La Slameuse, du Burkina Faso, a le plaisir et l’honneur d’annoncer sa participation au Festival International Ibn Battuta qui se tiendra à Tanger, au Maroc du 9 au 12 novembre 2017. Artiste de Slam célèbre, elle a commencé à s’illustrer dans un festival en 2009,un festival international spécialisé des musiques urbaines ou elle y découvre le SLAM et tombe sous son charme. Dotée d’un fort potentiel dans l’écriture, elle commença à se distinguer à travers ses premiers textes qui deviendront plus tard, un Art. Elle remporte de nombreux prix de Slam, notamment en juillet 2016 ou elle devient Ambassadrice de Bonne Volonté de West Africain Young Leaders, Juin 2016, Lauréate du Trophée « Slam Perform » aux victoires du Hip Hop et d’autres trophées et distinctions. Elle s’affiche comme la capitaine au féminin du Slam au Burkina Faso et devient par la même occasion, l’une des personnes ressources dans ce nouvel Art Lyrique au Burkina Faso. Malika La Slameuse : C’est une voix, des textes poignants et des émotions qui vous emportent… Venez découvrir le charisme des mots, l’élégance de ses textes autour de la Paix et la Tolérance et son charme vocal, lors de la Seconde Edition du Festival International Ibn Battuta.
12 Sep 2017
381
Share Video