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Call it the 'Super Bowl of Science.' The players at this match-up are among the brightest young minds in the United States. They are the winners of the nation's premiere math, science and technology competition for high school students. And for the first time in the nine year-history of the Siemens Competition, girls swept the top prizes in both categories. Isha Jain, a senior at Freedom High School in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, won the $100,000 scholarship in the individual category for her research on bone growth. Janelle Schlossberger and Amanda Marinoff, seniors at Plainview-Old Bethpage John F. Kennedy High School in Plainview, New York, won the $100,000 prize (which they will share) in the team category for their research on tuberculosis. All finalists walked away with scholarships ranging from $10,000 to $100,000 after having beaten out more than 1,600 contestants. There were six individuals and six team finalists. This year's projects include a webcam monitoring system to ensure the safe cooking of hamburgers that could help prevent E. Coli breakouts in the fast food industry; the discovery of a gene that could make tumors resistant to a common breast cancer drug; discoveries about the oceans with important implications for the global climate; and research that could lead to more effective treatment of brain tumors, the next generation of anti-tuberculosis drugs, new ways to treat Herpes Simplex Virus and even help people avoid jet lag and insomnia. Produced for Siemens
5 Dec 2007
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0:59
Merlin Dergham's MyMath education studies/researches.. on integrating technology into math classrooms www.24yahoo.info Since computers were first introduced into the classroom several decades ago, a great deal of research has investigated the effects of this technology on student outcomes. Meta-analyses of these data have indicated that outcomes, in general, are positive. researchers have confirmed these positive results, suggesting that technology-based instruction holds a great deal of promise for improving student performance at all levels. However, the successful introduction of computers into the classroom depends on a great many factors, including the abilities of teachers to integrate this technology into their curricula, and questions concerning whether teachers are up to this challenge remain a concern. These questions and concerns raise important issues since it is not just the computers that effect student outcomes, but also the skill of the teachers in developing a curriculum that takes full advantage of technological advances. - Strengths and Weaknesses of MML (mymathlab), based on Engelbrecht and Harding 2005 - Technical disbeliefs by MML (mymathlab) representatives Workshop on August 23rd, 2007- Pearson representatives. Concordia University (Montreal Canada) Check mymath videos related to technology applications into math classes as mymathlab (MML) and Moodle at: <a href="*******www.24yahoo****/emath/emathintegratingtechnologyclassmerlinmontreal.htm"> my e-Math projects </a> - Moodle features: A list of all its technical features Assignments. settings. chat. grades. quizzes. forum. reports. resources. tasks. messages... - MML* Moodle technical weaknesses and strengths comparing "server"
27 Sep 2009
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1:57
Merlin Dergham's Teaching mathematics by means of technology and integrating such available technologies into math classrooms www.24google**** What is clear is that teachers are primarily responsible for the curriculum development involved in teaching mathematics using technology, yet this will not be achieved unless teachers are up to this challenge. Currently, there are neither reliable curricula to support a technology-rich environment nor sufficient numbers of teachers who are able to meet the challenges of this environment. Sketchy evidence from schools and evidence from well-designed studies indicates that there are too many variables involved in technology integration to leave the task up to individual or institutional vision alone. As has been shown, chaos is often the result when integrating technology to the mathematics curriculum, and the demands and challenges of the technological society have not been met by math educational objectives. The chaos in the mathematics curriculum manifests itself in several ways: it can be categorized as individual or institutional. On an individual level, a number of teachers, math educators, and software programmers have independently presented the “New curriculum.” On an institutional level, some schools have developed their own curricula, theories, and applications, which are based solely on their vision but not on any type of research. In addition to existing challenges, integration becomes difficult due to certain fundamental clashes and conflicts, which have essentially been ignored by the above mentioned individuals and institutions. This has negatively affected the process of learning mathematics by means of technology. However, it is important to note that neither these flawed visions, institutional constraints and clashes, nor the technology itself are capable of preventing integration. Instead, successful integration is dependent on one critical variable: teachers must be equipped to meet the challenges of this task. Effective curriculum development lags behind technology development and institutional aims because teachers, in general, have not reached a level where there are able to seamlessly fit together these factors in the classroom.
27 Sep 2009
94
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1:04
Merlin Dergham's Teaching mathematics by means of technology and integrating such available technologies into math classrooms www.24google**** What is clear is that teachers are primarily responsible for the curriculum development involved in teaching mathematics using technology, yet this will not be achieved unless teachers are up to this challenge. Currently, there are neither reliable curricula to support a technology-rich environment nor sufficient numbers of teachers who are able to meet the challenges of this environment. Sketchy evidence from schools and evidence from well-designed studies indicates that there are too many variables involved in technology integration to leave the task up to individual or institutional vision alone. As has been shown, chaos is often the result when integrating technology to the mathematics curriculum, and the demands and challenges of the technological society have not been met by math educational objectives. The chaos in the mathematics curriculum manifests itself in several ways: it can be categorized as individual or institutional. On an individual level, a number of teachers, math educators, and software programmers have independently presented the “New curriculum.” On an institutional level, some schools have developed their own curricula, theories, and applications, which are based solely on their vision but not on any type of research. In addition to existing challenges, integration becomes difficult due to certain fundamental clashes and conflicts, which have essentially been ignored by the above mentioned individuals and institutions. This has negatively affected the process of learning mathematics by means of technology. However, it is important to note that neither these flawed visions, institutional constraints and clashes, nor the technology itself are capable of preventing integration. Instead, successful integration is dependent on one critical variable: teachers must be equipped to meet the challenges of this task. Effective curriculum development lags behind technology development and institutional aims because teachers, in general, have not reached a level where there are able to seamlessly fit together these factors in the classroom.
27 Sep 2009
215
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4:08
Merlin Dergham's Teaching mathematics by means of technology and integrating such available technologies into math classrooms www.24google**** What is clear is that teachers are primarily responsible for the curriculum development involved in teaching mathematics using technology, yet this will not be achieved unless teachers are up to this challenge. Currently, there are neither reliable curricula to support a technology-rich environment nor sufficient numbers of teachers who are able to meet the challenges of this environment. Sketchy evidence from schools and evidence from well-designed studies indicates that there are too many variables involved in technology integration to leave the task up to individual or institutional vision alone. As has been shown, chaos is often the result when integrating technology to the mathematics curriculum, and the demands and challenges of the technological society have not been met by math educational objectives. The chaos in the mathematics curriculum manifests itself in several ways: it can be categorized as individual or institutional. On an individual level, a number of teachers, math educators, and software programmers have independently presented the “New curriculum.” On an institutional level, some schools have developed their own curricula, theories, and applications, which are based solely on their vision but not on any type of research. In addition to existing challenges, integration becomes difficult due to certain fundamental clashes and conflicts, which have essentially been ignored by the above mentioned individuals and institutions. This has negatively affected the process of learning mathematics by means of technology. However, it is important to note that neither these flawed visions, institutional constraints and clashes, nor the technology itself are capable of preventing integration. Instead, successful integration is dependent on one critical variable: teachers must be equipped to meet the challenges of this task. Effective curriculum development lags behind technology development and institutional aims because teachers, in general, have not reached a level where there are able to seamlessly fit together these factors in the classroom.
27 Sep 2009
197
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0:57
over 917 problems are solved for math university final exams. A step-by-step solutions with full explanation supported by techniques of checking to make sure of a 100% success. Surf for more at: www.mathvideos.2join2****
20 Oct 2009
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0:25
*******pvaworld.info/sample-page/ipad/ iPad Review: The iPad is a tablet computer designed, developed and marketed by Apple primarily as a platform for audio-visual media including books, periodicals, movies, music, games, and web content. At about 1.5 pounds (680 grams), its size and weight fall between those of contemporary smartphones and laptop computers. Apple released the iPad in April 2010, and sold 3 million of the devices in 80 days. According to a report released by Strategy Analytics, the Apple iPad had gained a 95 percent share of Tablet PC sales at the end of the second quarter of 2010. During the second quarter of 2010, Apple sold 4.19 million iPads around the world. The iPad runs the same operating system as the iPod Touch and iPhone—and can run its own applications as well as iPhone applications. Without modification, and with the exception of web applications, it will only run programs approved by Apple and distributed via its online store. Like iPhone and iPod Touch, the iPad is controlled by a multitouch display—a departure from most previous tablet computers, which used a pressure-triggered stylus—as well as a virtual onscreen keyboard in lieu of a physical keyboard. The iPad uses a Wi-Fi data connection to browse the Internet, load and stream media, and install software. Some models also have a 3G wireless data connection which can connect to HSPA data networks. The device is managed and synced by iTunes on a personal computer viaUSB cable. The iPad’s touchscreen display is a 9.7 in (25 cm) liquid crystal display (1024 × 768 pixels) with fingerprint-resistant and scratch-resistant glass. Steve Jobs backed the choice of screen size, saying a 7-inch screen would be “too small to express the software.” He said 10 inches was the minimum for a tablet screen. Like the iPhone, the iPad is designed to be controlled by bare fingers; normal gloves and styli that prevent electrical conductivity may not be used, although there are special gloves andcapacitive styli designed for this use.
4 May 2011
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1:11
*******www.audioprepkit.24yahoo**** Math Audio preparation kit for university students in Montreal Quebec Canada These math audios prepare students to pass math tests and final exams. It is an innovative approach which is based on the latest math technology effective integration which leads students to success in a very short period of time. Listen more at: *******www.audioprepkit.24yahoo****
30 Apr 2012
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