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30:55
Part 1 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
9 Feb 2009
318
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35:25
Part 2 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
31 Jul 2008
190
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19:33
Part 3 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
31 Jul 2008
260
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7:40
In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video we visit the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., for the opening of "An Iconography of Contagion," an art exhibition featuring more than 20 public health posters from the 1920s to the 1990s.
29 Nov 2008
258
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5:01
Since the introduction of MSX and Dermo in the 1950’s, two infectious diseases that played a large role in the decline the Chesapeake Bay’s oyster population, several oyster hatcheries along the Eastern seaboard are working with scientists across many fields to develop innovative restoration programs. One idea is to introduce a non-native oyster from China called Crassostrea ariakensis. In this video podcast, MicrobeWorld talks about current research underway with C. ariakensis, the potential risk of new diseases that could affect the Bay’s ecology and/or human health, the attitudes of Maryland’s watermen toward the oysters possible introduction, and the role of local, state and federal policy. Special thanks goes out to the DC Science Writers Association, the Marian Koshland Science Museum and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Horn Point Laboratory for helping with the logistics and planning of the shoot.
2 Nov 2007
811
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4:38
MicrobeWorld visits the Marian Koshland Science Museum for “Microbe Lab,” a free day of activities for the general public. In this episode we interview Erika Shugart, deputy director of the Koshland Museum, about “Microbe Lab” and the Crack Koshie’s Curious Case: A Disease Detective Mission activity. Next, we talk with Nagla Fetouh, Education Program Manager for the Koshland Museum, who led a disease exchange activity that teaches people about ways to control the spread of infectious disease by participating in a simulation that shows just how fast illness can spread. Finally, Eric Flem, Communications Manager for Nikon Instruments, Inc., led us through a demonstration of Nikon’s Coolscope. A state of the art microscope used by clinicians and educators that has the ability to broadcast images live on the internet.
5 Feb 2008
472
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6:17
MicrobeWorld Video 14 – HIV/AIDS Education In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video we ask some leading researchers, education specialists, and public health officials about the state of HIV/AIDS education in America and ideas they have to support the teaching of microbial evolution using the latest HIV/AIDS research — all while instilling innovative prevention strategies. Filmed at a forum for educators on February, 11, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C. and at San Diego State University, this episode features the following experts: Roland Wolkowicz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, San Diego State University, whose research focus is on the use of random peptide libraries and other chemical genetics approaches for the study of viral pathogenesis and the search of antiviral factors in HIV1 and HCV. Shannon Lee Hader, M.D., MPH, Director of the HIV/AIDS Administration for Washington, D.C., an epidemiologist and public health physician who has worked with HIV-infected children and adults in Brazil, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe. Anila Asghar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education at Johns Hopkins University, whose research focuses on curriculum development and evolution. Educational resources mentioned within the video can be found online at: Koshland Science Museum *******koshlandscience****/teachers/webquest.jsp NIH Curriculum Guide *******science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih1/Diseases/default.htm Howard Hughes MedicalInstitute *******www.hhmi****/biointeractive/ Please feel free to embed or distribute this video.
5 Feb 2009
5811
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1:09:31
MicrobeWorld Video presents episode 33 of This Week in Virology. Hosts Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Dick Despommier and guest Raul Andino recorded TWiV live at the ASM General Meeting in Philadelphia, where they discussed increased arterial blood pressure caused by cytomegalovirus infection, restriction of influenza replication at low temperature by the avian viral glycoproteins, first isolation of West Nile virus in Pennsylvania, and current status of influenza. Links for this episode: Cytomegalovirus infection causes an increase of arterial blood pressure Avian influenza virus glycoproteins restrict virus replication at low temperature First West Nile virus isolation of the year in PA CDC press release of 18 May 2009 Glaxo’s influenza vaccine with adjuvant NY Times article on Guillain-Barré and a more scientific view Weekly Science Picks Dick - National Museum of the History of Science and Medicine, Leiden Alan - Beginning Mac OS X Programming Vincent - Vaccinated by Paul Offit Raul - HubbleSite
8 Jan 2011
466
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1:14:20
Bacteria communicate with chemical languages that allow them to synchronize their behavior and thereby act as multi-cellular organisms. This process, called quorum sensing, enables bacteria to do things they can’t do as a single cell, like successfully infect and cause disease in humans. Bonnie Bassler, Ph.D., the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University and President-elect for the American Society for Microbiology, has been researching strategies that can interfere with quorum sensing and will hopefully yield novel antibiotics to prevent disease. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video we present the full presentation Dr. Bassler gave at the Marian Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C. on June 18, 2009. Not only does Dr. Bassler explain the mechanisms of bacterial communication, but she also puts forth her theories on how we can disrupt this communication for human benefit.
8 Jan 2011
450
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1:01:41
MicrobeWorld Video and This Week in Virology team up to bring you a tour of the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) in Boston, MA. In this episode the host of TWiV, Vincent Racaniello, speaks with exhibitors and visitors, including Professors Derek Smith, Michael Schmidt, Frederick Hayden, and Myra McClure.
8 Jan 2011
232
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8:29
In episode 45 of MicrobeWorld Video, filmed at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stan Maloy talks with Jeremy Nicholson, Head of the Department of Surgery & Cancer at Imperial College London, about his work with metabolomics and the human gut. Maloy and Nicholson discuss the science of metabolomics, the systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints that specific cellular processes leave behind, and how gut microbial metabolites are part of the diagnostic pattern of results when looking at a host of diseases. Nicholson, who is known for his work in pharmaco-metabonomics, also discusses the potential for personalized medicine.
12 Mar 2011
305
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5:39
From your local bus route to international air travel, infectious diseases can spread across the globe in a matter of hours. In this video podcast episode filmed at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Stephen Eubank from the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute of Virginia Tech and Daniel Lucey from Georgetown University discuss the role of transportation in the spread of disease and examine the effectiveness of various measures to curb transmission. Stephen Eubank, Ph.D., is a project director at the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute of Virginia Tech. His research focuses on modeling and simulating the spread of disease and regional transportation, and the analysis of complex systems. Daniel Lucey, M.D., M.P.H., is an adjunct professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Georgetown University, where he is co-director of the master of science program in biohazardous threat agents and emerging infectious diseases. In recent years, his teaching focus has been on SARS, avian flu, and the threat of pandemic human influenza. Resources Learn more about infectious diseases at *******www.koshland-science-museum****/exhib_infectious/index.jsp Transportation Research Board of the National Academies *******www.trb****/default.asp Pandemic Flu and Travel *******www.pandemicflu.gov/travel/index.html
11 Jun 2009
1335
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20:22
Watch Dr. Jeff Fox, Features Editor for Microbe Magazine talk with Arturo Casadevall, MD, Ph.D., the editor-in-chief of mBio, the new online, open-access journal from the American Society for Microbiology, about an opinion/hypothesis article he co-authored suggesting that rising global temperatures will result in new fungal infections for mammals living in temperate climates. This video was recorded live on May 24, 2010, at the American Society for Microbiology's 110th General Meeting in San Diego, Ca.
17 Nov 2010
376
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5:19
MicrobeWorld and the Koshland Science Museum present a video podcast of comedian Brian Malow that includes excerpts from his science comedy act on infectious disease and an interview about the geek mystique of science.
5 Oct 2007
416
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5:54
Coral reefs are dying a death of a thousand cuts and their disappearance threatens not only the incredibly diverse ecosystem that depends on them, but also human health and welfare. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video marine scientists Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Ph.D., chair of marine studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Kiho Kim, Ph.D., director of the environmental studies program at American University, explain the important relationship between microbes and corals, and how this delicate symbiosis that sustains life on and around reefs is facing numerous threats from human interactions to global climate change. In addition, Tundi Agardy, Ph.D., founder and executive director of Sound Seas, discusses the need for public policy and community-based conservation efforts that may help stave off the degradation of these vital ocean ecosystems. According to a 2004 report issued by the World Wildlife Fund, 24% of the world's reefs are under imminent risk of collapse through human pressures; and a further 26% are under a longer term threat of collapse. If nothing is done to protect these resources, many scientists estimate that reefs around the West Indies in the Caribbean will be gone by 2020, while the Great Barrier Reef may only last for another three decades. Please visit the following sites for more information about coral reefs: www.climateshifts**** www.reefrelief**** www***ralreef.noaa.gov Please feel free to embed or distribute this video.
22 Dec 2010
649
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6:06
West Nile virus entered the United States in 1999 and is now considered a seasonal epidemic that starts in the summer and continues into the fall. First isolated in Uganda in 1937, the virus can cause severe human meningitis or encephalitis in 1% of those infected. In 2007 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported 124 fatalities. The rapid spread of West Nile virus has put local and state mosquito surveillance programs on the front line of public health and disease preparedness. In this episode, MicrobeWorld Video interviews Dr. Jorge Arias, an expert in vector-borne diseases of the Americas. Arias currently serves as the Environmental Health Supervisor of the Fairfax County Health Department in Northern Virginia. In this role, he is responsible for directing the Disease-Carrying Insects Program which focuses on West Nile virus and Lyme disease. For more information about West Nile Virus, please visit: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - *******www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm National Pesticide Information Center - *******npic.orst.edu/wnv/ Fairfax County Health Department - *******www.fairfaxcounty.gov/hd/westnile/ This episode was filmed at the Marian Koshland Science Museum, the Fairfax County Health Department, Huntley Meadows Park in Fairfax, Va., and the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.
18 Aug 2008
739
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