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DECARBOXYLASE TEST MEDIUM BASE, FALKOW is used for cultivation and differentiation of bacteria based on their decarboxlase activity. “Falkow” developed the lysine decarboxylase medium for differentiating Salmonellae and Shigellae.
21 Sep 2019
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1:15
Meet one of the graduates from the Biotechnology Technician - Industrial Microbiology Program
18 Apr 2010
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0:40
Titan Biotech Ltd. continues to build on the well-established Life Sciences product line we have manufactured and supplied under brand name TM Media since 1992. For over twenty five years, Titan Biotech Ltd. has committed its research and development department as one of the leading producer of reliable and high quality Microbiological & Biotechnological products with an emphasis on service, value and customer satisfaction.
3 Jul 2019
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*******www.GetTextbooksForLess**** Get the best prices on Microbiology textbooks and save your dollars for the dining hall. Save up to 75 when you skip the bookstore and shop for the literature you need for less. The University bookstore rings up a big bill. Get smart with the books, supplies and apparel you need. Get the smart deal on new and used college textbooks at GetTextbooksForLess****.
12 Oct 2009
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0:53
No one handles microbiology assignments better than us. It is because our writers at Assignments4u have the required knowledge in the subject.
29 Mar 2018
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6:54
This video, produced in partnership with Global Health TV, showcases the American Society for Microbiology's laboratory capacity building ... all » initiatives in Zambia. The film focuses on ASM's support to the Zambian Ministry of Health and US government agencies in the strengthening of clinical microbiology services with the objective of integration of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV/AIDS laboratory infrastructure. Consultants representing ASM have traveled to Zambia to train researchers on diagnostics for TB, blood culture, and basic bacteriology. For more information about ASM's international activities, please visit www.asm****.
5 Oct 2007
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7:05
See the history of microbiology in nine scenes of gags, burlesque, drollery and song. Produced by Active Cultures, the vernacular theatre of Maryland, Petri Dish Circus is a play loosely based off of the classic non-fiction novel Microbe Hunters by Paul Henry de Kruif. Much like the original book first published in 1926 that describes 12 historical milestones in science, Active Cultures reenacts “the daring-do of Louis Pasteur in his Parisian lab, the Scotch fortitude of Ronald Ross as he travels through disease-stricken Africa, and the melancholy saga of Walter Reed as he battles Yellow Jack in Cuba” — all with a healthy dose of humor. In this episode we interview Mary Resing, artistic director for Active Cultures, who talks about Microbe Hunters as inspiration for theatre and her whimsical, and slightly pointed, approach to portraying the women featured in de Kruif’s work. Excerpts from the actual performance are also featured.
8 Jan 2008
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5:43
The American Society for Microbiology is helping African nations foster a scientific community that is better able to address the current and future problems that threaten not only the local population, but the world at large. Like many African countries, Zambia and South Africa are deeply affected by HIV and tuberculosis, as well as a number of other infectious diseases. In March of 2008, ASM President Cliff Houston, Ph.D., traveled to Zambia and South Africa to gauge and assess the Society’s efforts to transfer knowledge and state of the art diagnostic technology training support in laboratories, schools and universities, and to assist in meeting the goals for care and treatment of people living with TB and HIV in these resource-limited countries.
11 Jun 2008
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30:55
Part 1 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
9 Feb 2009
317
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35:25
Part 2 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
31 Jul 2008
184
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19:33
Part 3 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Chairman, Canon US Life Sciences, Inc.?Susan Perkins, Assistant Curator, Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, AMNH # James Staley, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington Visit MicrobeWorld online at www.microbeworld****
31 Jul 2008
260
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0:01
Ronald Atlas, former President for the American Society for Microbiology, discusses the new One Health Initiative that recognizes the inter-relationships among human, animal, and environmental health and seeks to enhance communication, cooperation, and collaboration in integrating these areas for the health and well-being of all species. Development of the One Health Initiative began in 2007 with the American Veterinary Medical Association's (AVMA) efforts to strengthen communications and collaboration with colleagues in human medicine. The AVMA established a Task Force on this issue which released specific recommendations in June 2008. The American Medical Association (AMA) in June 2007 passed a resolution supporting the Initiative and strengthening collaboration between human and veterinary medicine in dealing with zoonotic diseases. Other endorsers include the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, American Medical Association, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Health (ASTMH), the American Phytopathological Society (APS), several smaller veterinary organizations, and over 300 individual scientists, including current and past leaders of the ASM.
1 Aug 2008
338
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26:00
Will we become defenseless against bacteria? Will bacteria always find a way to infect and even kill us? The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria poses an enormous problem around the world. Scientists believe that the overuse of antibiotics is increasing the appearance of these pathogens. In the US, increasing casualties resulting from drug resistant staphylococcus infections received wide media attention. While antibiotics only work on bacterial infections, many patients and doctors regard antibiotics as a front-line form of treating any type of infection. Antibiotics are often prescribed because the specific pathogen that is causing an illness is often difficult to determine. In some cases they are used as a preventative measure. But is this the best defense? Are there ways to beat bacteria at their own game? On September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, discussed how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. In part 1 of this 3 part video series, Dr. Levy discusses the basics of microbial pathogens, bacteria, and antibiotic resistance. And, Dr. Tollefson outlines the various types and classes of antibiotic drugs, approved uses, and current levels of effectiveness. Dr. Levy is Professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine where he is the Director of the Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance. He directs research on mechanisms of bacterial antibiotic resistance. Stuart Levy is also Staff Physician at the Tufts Medical Center and he also serves as the president of The International Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics. Dr. Tollefson is Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). She previously served as Deputy Director of the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), where she led CVM's efforts to implement a risk-based approach to address antimicrobial resistance, fulfilling a 2001 Congressional mandate, and was instrumental in the founding of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria. Tollefson also served as Chief of Epidemiology in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition where she successfully investigated numerous outbreaks of food borne disease and served as liaison to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Parts 2 and 3 will be published over the coming weeks.
17 Oct 2008
524
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27:36
On September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, discussed how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. In part 2 of this 3 part video series, Dr. Levy discusses how antibiotic resistance develops, the development practices drug companies employ when producing antimicrobials, and how this process may change in the future. Dr. Tollefson outlines how the FDA is encouraging the development of antibiotics in an industry that is mostly focussed on manufacturing drugs for chronic illnesses. Dr. Levy is Professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine where he is the Director of the Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance. He directs research on mechanisms of bacterial antibiotic resistance. Stuart Levy is also Staff Physician at the Tufts Medical Center and he also serves as the president of The International Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics. Dr. Tollefson is Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). She previously served as Deputy Director of the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), where she led CVM's efforts to implement a risk-based approach to address antimicrobial resistance, fulfilling a 2001 Congressional mandate, and was instrumental in the founding of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria. Tollefson also served as Chief of Epidemiology in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition where she successfully investigated numerous outbreaks of food borne disease and served as liaison to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Part 3 will be published next week. To view part one visit the MicrobeWorld Video archives at www.microbeworld****/look/MicrobeWorldVideo.aspx
28 Mar 2011
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36:12
In the final episode of this 3 part video series on how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes in depth on the use of antimicrobial drugs in agriculture, their efficacy, and adverse human health consequences. Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, discusses policy, regulatory and funding issues around antibiotic resistance. Both Dr. Tollefson and Dr. Levy take a handful of questions from the audience. The series, "Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense?" was filmed on September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C. Parts 1 and 2 can be found at www.microbeworld****.
8 Nov 2008
249
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