Results for: ninth circuit court Search Results
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War Veterans v. City of San Diego case decided that the 29-foot concrete cross, which has stood for 57 years has to go The ACLU brought the suit on behalf of the Jewish War Veterans. A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has decided a memorial cross on federal land on Mt. Soledad, California says the cross has to come down. Psalm 2 1] Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? [2] The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying, [3] Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us. [4] He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision. [5] Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure. [6] Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. [7] I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. [8] Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. SAY THIS PRAYER: Dear Jesus, I am a sinner and am headed to eternal hell because of my sins. I believe you died on the cross to take away my sins and to take me to heaven. Jesus, I ask you now to come into my heart and take away my sins and give me eternal life. *******www.armyofgod****
9 Jan 2011
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3:46
*******www.FindFamiliesInMexico**** Family Finding Differences Between Mexico and U.S. I'll be talking about family finding and the role that the Internet plays both in the U.S. and Mexico. Family finding is about the identification and location of a biological parent, grandparent and other adult family members when a child is entering foster care. It's very important that these family members are notified so they can participate to help ensure the well-being of the child and, if necessary, provide a permanent, loving home. Now one of the tools that state agencies, non-profits and attorneys use to do family finding is the Internet. Let's face it. Everyone in the U.S. is online. People are sharing stories on Facebook, tweeting about their weekends, what they had for lunch while kids and their grandparents are sharing photos and videos on YouTube and Flickr. All of this information is open to the public. If that isn't enough, lots of documents such as birth certificates and marriage licenses are just a few clicks away as long as you bring your plastic. In fact, the guide "Making 'Relative Search' Happen" published by ChildFocus states that, "Internet resources are a fast-growing part of the [family finding] search toolkit. The more details about possible relatives that have been obtained from personal contacts and other databases, the more effective internet searches are likely to be." Now even though the Internet is a powerful tool that in part allows agencies and attorneys to successfully do family finding in the U.S., this doesn't mean the same results can be expected when doing family finding in Mexico. In fact, when it comes to Mexico, the number of people that can be found using the Internet is almost the complete opposite from the U.S. Whereas up to 80% of relatives can be identified using the Internet and online databases from companies such as LexisNexis and U.S. Search, less than 20% of personal information about people living in Mexico can be found online. So why is this? Well, one reason is the lack of information on people living in Mexico. For instance, years ago there was a Mexican website where you could search for all the people listed in the Mexico white pages. But this site has been gone for years. Now there is no central website for Mexico where state case workers can go to do family finding. The same is true of online databases. There is no equivalent to U.S. Search for Mexico. One of the key problems is that the majority of information from legal documents such as birth certificates hasn't yet been digitized. It's been estimated that only about 15% of all information on Mexican residents is available online. And most of this information is still in a file cabinet or in a box in some closet or warehouse. The Internet is a powerful tool to do family finding. However, when it comes to Mexico the likelihood of finding information about a parent or family member is much lower compared to the U.S. It's important to remember that Mexico is not the U.S. and what works here doesn't automatically work in Mexico. The solution is that state agencies and non-profits need to look for additional resources to help them do family finding so they can identify and locate more parents and adult family members in Mexico of children entering U.S. foster care. This is Richard Villasana, the Mexico Guru. Be sure to check back for more videos about Hispanic foster children and family finding. Feel free to leave comments. Together we can find solutions so that more Hispanic children can connect with family in Mexico and hopefully spend less time in foster care. Saludos. Visit us at *******www.FindFamilesInMexico**** to get more information about our family finding services and training. Be sure to folllow us on Facebook at *******www.Facebook****/familyfindingmx. Richard Villasana is CEO of Find Families In Mexico. The company offers a highly specialized family finding service that identifies and locates families living in Mexico. Richard and his team have guided more than 4,100 clients including the State of Oregon, Dept. of Human Services, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Defense, the Ninth Circuit Court, private foster care agencies and attorneys to identify and find biological parents and extended family members in Mexico.
19 Aug 2011
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*******www.FindFamiliesInMexico**** Key Family Finding Strategy: Knowing the Complete Name Hi. This is Richard Villasana, the Mexico Guru. Today I'll be talking about doing family finding for relatives living in Mexico. One of the most fundamental and critical pieces of information you must have to begin to identify a relative is the person's name. Now as simple as this sounds, we spend more time educating people including genealogists about Spanish names than any other area of family finding. So whether you're a family finding specialist or a genealogist, your first goal is to have the complete name of the person you're looking for. So as an example let's get the complete name for this person. Now this person's first name is Mario, but we want to have Mario's complete name. In Mexico, people have two last names, also called surnames. The first surname in Spanish is the last name of the father. In this case, Mario's father's surname is Garcia. The second surname for Mario will be his mother's last name. So Mario's second last name is Gomez. Now by putting the first name together with these two surnames, you have Mario's complete name, Mario Garcia Gomez. Remember - it's vital to have the complete name. If you just use Mario Garcia, you're setting yourself up for a lot of wasted time and it's very likely you'll never find Mario or his family. You must have the complete name for successful family finding. This is Richard Villasana, the Mexico Guru. Here are two ways I can help you further. Become a subscriber so you'll get notices about upcoming videos to help you with family finding in Mexico. And be sure to follow us on Facebook. Post your questions and you'll get answers. I look forward to hearing from you. Saludos. Visit us at *******www.FindFamilesInMexico**** to get more information about our family finding services and training. Be sure to follow us on Facebook at *******www.Facebook****/familyfindingmx. Richard Villasana is CEO of Find Families In Mexico. The company offers a highly specialized family finding service that identifies and locates families living in Mexico. Richard and his team have guided more than 4,100 clients including the State of Oregon, Dept. of Human Services, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Defense, the Ninth Circuit Court, private foster care agencies and attorneys to identify and find biological parents and extended family members in Mexico.
23 Sep 2011
431
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