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3:26
BY TRACY PFEIFFER ANCHOR: CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy A week after the devastating earthquake that rocked Japan, workers are still struggling to get the country’s nuclear crisis under control. Japan’s nuclear agency has upgraded the situation from a four to a five on a 7-level scale, bringing the catastrophe on par with the 1979 Three Mile Island incident in Pennsylvania. New aerial footage from a military helicopter paints a grim picture of the extent of the damage to Japan’s Fukushima reactor, which has seen multiple explosions since the quake and consequent tsunamis. (Video: The Telegraph) The chopper itself was part of an initial tactic in the fight to keep spent nuclear rods from overheating, utilizing a water dumping technique commonly used to fight forest fires -- but strong winds quickly nixed that idea. “Now the focus of the efforts by emergency workers has shifted away from airborne spraying to ground level and a more extensive use of these firetrucks to try to cool and restore power to the reactors. The aim is to get water back into the pools that house spent nuclear fool rods and avert a major radiation leak.” (BBC) Even though the situation has been upgraded to level 5 -- defined by the IAEA as a quote -- “accident with wider consequences” -- Japanese officials say it’s due to new information about damage already done, not the current situation. (IAEA) And Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano assures the international community, their efforts are keeping the reactors stable at least. YUKIO EDANO, JAPANESE CHIEF CABINET SECRETARY (TRANSLATION): “As for reactor number 4, the situation is not as serious as reactors number 2 and 3, but we need to keep adding water to cool them, and be prepared. This is important.” Meanwhile, another high priority goal is to restore power to the plant, which would enable crews to restart generators that power the reactor’s cooling systems. (Video: BBC) The International Atomic Energy Agency says a half-mile power cord has been laid to Fukushima’s reactor number 2 building. But retired nuclear engineer Lake Barrett tells The Washington Post, it won’t be as simple as plugging in a cord. “‘Existing cabling is probably burned,’ Barrett said, meaning crews in bulky radiation suits will have to engineer a high-voltage solution on the fly by boring through thick outer walls and connecting car-size electrical switches and relays.” And while the world watches the battle against further nuclear catastrophe, NBC’s Ann Curry reports -- Japan is a country on edge. ANN CURRY, REPORTER: “Passport centers around the country are full, train stations mobbed. Airlines are scrambling to fly thousands of people out of Tokyo. ... Crowds flocked aboard buses out of Sendai, a city hard-hit by the quake and tsunami, now low on basic necessities. Confusion, anger, and distrust are spreading despite the government’s reassurances about the risks of radiation.” Experts say for now, wind currents are reportedly driving radiation away from Tokyo, Japan’s most-populated city. But a reporter from Global Radio News tells Fox News, those inside the city have been wary of exposure risks. GAVIN BLAIR, REPORTER, GLOBAL RADIO NEWS: “Apparently the staff at the Italian embassy there weren’t trustful of the Japanese government’s pronouncements and took a Geiger counter onto the roof themselves and found that the levels of radiation were actually a fifth of what they were in Rome. So while there has been some panic in Tokyo, levels are back to normal there.” Japan’s National Police Agency has raised the death toll to almost 7,000, and more than 10,000 are still listed as missing. ABC Australia reports there are currently around half a million people living in shelters. 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
873
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2:07
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN AND BRANDON TWICHELL ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy After a third explosion at Japan’s Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant - international observers fear a nuclear meltdown is looming. Nuclear and radiological experts now say the incident is approaching the severity of the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. Adding to those concerns - NPR explains - a fire at the plant’s number 4 reactor has experts worried fuel rods have been exposed - leaving open the possibility they could melt and leak radiation into the atmosphere. CNN contributor Jim Walsh says - he’s watching the plant’s primary containment vessel - which is the last line of defense against full radioactive release. He says he’s hoping this is more Three Mile Island than Chernobyl. “You know, Three Mile Island, when it had its problem, the containment vessel held and while there was some radiation out there, the core did not leak out into the environment.” But on ABC’s Good Morning America - nuclear security expert Joe Cirincione says the plant’s design makes hope difficult. He calls the incident -quote- “unprecedented in nuclear power history.” “It’s made worse by the way the Japanese build their reactors. They cluster them together as you just reported. Many of the plants in Japan have four or more units, so what that means is it’s very efficient, but a disaster at one can avalanche into a complicated disaster next door.” 140,000 people have been ordered to stay indoors. And on Tuesday Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced radioactive levels could - quote “have an effect on humans.” According to Canada’s CTV - that public announcement is a step in the right direction AWAY from Chernobyl. “You think of all the people back in the Soviet days who were scrambling to get any information they possibly could, but there was a secretive lid (on the disaster). … Japan appears to have learned from Chernobyl’s mistakes. … the government has been communicating with the public on a daily basis, and emergency measures are in full effect.” According to NPR - as of Tuesday Tokyo Electric Power had evacuated all but 50 of its workers. The ones left behind are working to cool the reactors by pumping in sea water and venting the resulting steam. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos to get daily video updates in your stream. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
1057
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2:34
BY MIRANDA WHEATLEY You're watching multisource US video news analysis from Newsy. Has the nuclear crisis in Japan -- found its way to rainwater in the U.S.? According to several news outlets, officials say rainwater in Massachusetts has tested positive for Radioiodine-131. “It is 6,500 miles from Fukishima, Japan to Massachusetts but that’s how far radioactive fallout from the plant has traveled.” CNN “Trace amounts of that radioactive material from Japan has turned up in rainwater in at least 13 United States, states.” Fox News “They think the radioiodine may be linked to Japan’s damaged nuclear plant and plan to monitor the state’s drinking water.” HLN Officials say the amount of Radioiodine is not enough to cause alarm. MIT’s Ian Hutchinson tells WFXT in Boston radiation is a naturally occurring element and harmless in small amounts. “Radiation is a completely natural part of our background. The human body has a substantial amount of natural radiation in it, the only reason we know that this particular radiation came from the nuclear reactor site is because it’s a particular type of radiation that comes from this particular type of iodine we can identify it through specific tests.” CNN echoes that response saying spikes in radiation were seen in the U.S. even before the earthquake in Japan. “Las Vegas, there’s spikes, this is the earthquake, there are spikes before the earthquake, after the earthquake. The sun makes more radiation than what you had there in Massachusetts. A plane ride from California to L.A., from California to New York would give you more radiation than that.” The public health commissioner tells WCVB drinking water in Boston is safe. “We want to make clear that here is no health impact. None of the cities and towns rely on rainwater on their primary source of water--that is why we are so comfortable when saying drinking water supplies throughout the states are completely safe.” The Boston Globe reports the Radioiodine won’t be around for long and the public health commissioner says at these levels even drinking the rainwater directly would have little impact. “...only half of the level of radiation will be present in eight days, and so on until it dissipates.” But as Forbes points out - even with reassurance the findings have some Americans worried. “...some Americans have not been content to take the government at its word. Geiger counters have been selling like popsicles in summer, and traffic has never been higher at websites that display data from radiation monitoring stations.” For more information on the EPA’s radiation monitoring site, RadNet, check out the link in our transcript section. Get more multisource US video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
915
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2:35
BY JACQUELINNE MEJIA ANCHOR SALEM SOLOMON You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy Tokyo Electric Power Company released a timeline describing when it expects the nuclear crisis in northeast Japan to be resolved. HLN summarizes the strategy. “It could be nine months before those damaged reactors in Japan are completely shutdown. The owners of the Fukushima nuclear plant say that it’s gonna take three months just to bring radiation levels down and get the cooling systems back to normal. Then it could be another three to six months before the reactors get cold enough to shutdown.” So what exactly is a “cold shutdown”? The Financial Times explains, in order for a reactor’s radioactive uranium fuel to not heat up, water inside a reactor must be below 100 degrees centigrade at normal atmospheric pressure. The FT also reports on the plan’s execution. “To overcome the problem, engineers plan to flood the reactors’ containment chambers with enough water to immerse the internal pressure vessels that hold the fuel. [...] Once a “cold shutdown” has been achieved, the long decommissioning process can begin. The plant’s fuel will have to be left to cool for years, and the whole process is expected to take at least a decade.” Many Japanese people living in the evacuation zone and beyond have expressed doubts about the effectiveness of the plan, due to the previous lack of transparency from both TEPCO and the Japanese government, the Telegraph reports. “In Fukushima, locals complained that the government’s decision to suddenly and inexplicably raise the alert level at the plant two notches to seven, the same level of seriousness as the Chernobyl disaster, has created a maelstrom of rumours.” The nine-month timetable isn’t sitting well with the estimated 100,000 people evacuated from areas with high levels of radioactivity. An editor for Japan Today talks to CTV on the multiple effects for those forced from their homes. “ [...] No one was happy at all, because these people want to go back to their homes, but it looks like they won’t be able to for at least 9 months. So...what do they do? And then the farmers need compensation for their crops and the dairy farmers need compensation, they’re throwing out their milk. So this is a really contentious issue that’s gonna go on for many, many months.” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met over the weekend with Emperor Akihito to discuss the long-term rebuilding process -- euronews reports on how the U.S. wants to help. “She announced the creation of a public-private partnership to help Japan rebuild from the world’s most expensive natural disaster.” There was one bright spot for victims of the nuclear crisis. The Japanese government told TEPCO to pay $12,000 to each family and $9,000 for single-person households. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Apr 2011
1223
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3:11
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource video news analysis from Newsy. This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. (Video: RT) “And we open with breaking news: the United Nations Security Council has moments ago voted on a resolution, imposing a no-fly zone extending over Libya. And that, quote, “all necessary means can be used to protect citizens.” In world news — Agency reports say British and French warplanes would be leading the imposing of the no-fly zone, even as Gaddafi promises retaliation. RT reports the operation could start as early as today — though some facts are still unclear. “Well in theory this no-fly zone could go into action today, Friday. We are hearing from the French government that it will act swiftly and the British cabinet are meeting and from both these governments we are hearing that they could take action within hours. But there are still many unknowns. Who will be involved? Who will have the chain of command? And what will be the involvement of Arab countries?” Still in world news — Japan has upped its nuclear alert level, signaling a higher risk of radiation. The level rose from 4 to 5, on a 1 to 7 scale. Al Jazeera reports — the workers at Fukushima are now getting more help from the outside to battle the possible catastrophic meltdown. “It’s the fire department that is now being called in to help control the situation at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Around 30 teams are getting ready to spray Reactor 3 in an attempt to cool the overheating fuel rods. It’s not going to be easy.” In U.S. news — it looks like National Public Radio may have to be National Private Radio. The House yesterday voted to stop any tax dollars from going to NPR. Denver’s KCNC has more on the budget chop. “Last year NPR received $5 million in federal funding. Republicans say cutting those funds would make fiscal sense. The Democrats are calling it an ideological attack that would deprive local stations from access to programs. One Coloradan congressman said the government and media simply don't mix.” Also in U.S. news -- Homeland Security is stepping up enforcement after alarms sounded in Dallas, Chicago, and Seattle airports. The cause? Radiation levels found on passengers and cargo disembarking from Japan. KATU reports. ANCHOR: “The department of homeland security says it's continuing to check passengers and Freight arriving at the nation's airports and sea terminals.” REPORTER: “Sea-tac officials say any higher radiation - found in a cargo jet - was at extremely low levels...Not dangerous. NAPOLITANO: “We are doing screening of passengers and cargo if there happens to be even a blip of radiation.” In entertainment -- Billy Ray Cyrus is picking up the pieces of his Achey Breaky Heart. He’s called off his divorce and is ready to worked out his marital problems with wife of 17 years, Tish Cyrus. ABC News has more. ANCHOR 1: “They have now called off the divorce. And this is sort of a sneak peek "the view" because they sat down for an interview and he reveals he and Tish are trying to reconcile, get the family to come back together.” ANCHOR 2: “And Miley has had her issues the past few months. Let's hope that can bring the family back to you. Good for you. You rarely hear about -- families coming back.” 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates. Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
19 Mar 2011
815
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2:19
BY YIQIAN ZHANG ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy. “While Americans are watching the situation in Japan, many on the West Coast are trying to protect themselves in case of radiation fallout. People there are rushing to buy potassium iodide. It’s an over-the-counter drug that protects the thyroid from radiation.” (KRCG) In some places such as Los Angeles, the pills are sold out. But does potassium iodide even protect against radiation? A writer for medical blog WebMD says, not really. “It’s important to note that potassium iodide pills protect only the thyroid. They don’t prevent your body from taking in the radiation and don’t help prevent radiation damage to other parts of the body.” (WebMD) And a health expert tells Fox News- the risks associated with the medicine may not be worth it. “It can cause thyroid disease, it can cause allergies, it can cause stomach upset, know as you are vomiting it can cause diarrhea…” (Fox News) Regardless of whether the pills work- a health expert tells KSBW- the U.S. west coast isn’t exactly inside the radiation zone. “The evacuation zone they are moving people to is 12 miles from the nuclear plant. That’s what they are saying is a safe area. We are from five to seven thousand miles from there. Do the math.” (KSBW) But an editor for Bay Citizen argues- with all the ambiguous reports about the radiation levels, it makes sense- people are scared. “Experts we spoke to seem convinced that no matter what happens at Fukushima Daiichi, a radiation cloud blowing across the Pacific won't pose any health hazards in California. But since we don't really know exactly what level of radiation exposure might cause long-term health problems, I'm not sure I believe this.” (Bay Citizen) That editor went on to say definitive answers about radiation levels are in quote “maddeningly short supply.” Still - a BlogHer writer says that’s no reason to panic. “You can either run around like a headless chicken, hightailing it to the closest pharmacy so you can buy hundreds of bottles of potassium iodide, while you constantly wonder when the world will cave in, or you can do your best to be informed -- then take a deep breath -- and let it go.” (BlogHer) According to Google Insights, searches for “potassium iodide” and similar terms have increased more than 5,000 percent over the past week- but only in the U.S. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
356
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2:35
BY: SAMUEL JOSEPH ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY You're watching multisource global news analysis from Newsy. Energy concerns rise as Japan is hit with the largest aftershock since the March 11th 8.9 magnitude earthquake. Thursday’s 7.1 magnitude aftershock knocked out power to more than two million homes in northeast Japan, lasting more than a minute and killing three people while injuring hundreds more. And it’s not just household outages that have people worried. The Fukushima nuclear reactors -- which have been front and center since the March 11 quake -- did not suffer significant further damage this round. But ABC reports, other plants were not so fortunate. NEAL KARLINSKY: “At two other facilities, the Onogawa Nuclear Plant and the Higashidori Plant, the quake caused power outages that forced both on to emergency generators to keep fuel rods safe. At Onogawa, water from spent fuel roads actually spilled on to the floor, but was contained. Experts monitoring the crisis worry that more strain is being put on reactors that are already overburdened.” Five coal-powered plants were also shut down, increasing the strain on Japan’s power sources. With the anticipated peak in electricity usage during the upcoming summer months, the Japanese government has taken steps to prevent widespread power grid failure. According to American Chronicle... “...the government appears to believe massive blackouts would occur unless measures backed by the force of law are in place. Such concern has prompted the government to call on leading companies to reduce electricity consumption by 25 percent to 30 percent over last year.” Households are being asked to cut electricity usage between 15 to 20 percent. This has prompted some to buy energy efficient bulbs and appliances -- and the BBC reports, businesses are feeling the squeeze as well. TOSHIO NAKAMURA: “We are proposing changes in the way we operate, like changing hours to work during the night or in the early morning. Some shops can close on Monday, and others on Tuesday to have some sort of rotating system. We’re not using elevators, turning down lights and not having the air conditioning on too cold.” The issues with the Onogawa and Higashidori plants, along with the ongoing crisis at the Fukushima plant, have caused serious doubts about the future of nuclear power in Japan. According to officials interviewed by the Denki Shimbun - the future of nuclear power is still unclear. “Depending on the future development of the accident, we could be drawn into a situation where we will temporarily not be able to support nuclear power, which had been actively promoted by the national government as national policy.” More aftershocks are expected for the next few months. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your stream. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy
12 Apr 2011
1272
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1:57
BY EMOKE BEBIAK ANCHOR ALEX ROZIER You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Amid vast devastation and an escalating nuclear crisis, Japan proves to be a nation of strength and solidarity. There are no reports of looting or crime, which usually follow natural disasters. Instead, Japanese people are helping each other and trying to restore order to areas destroyed by the quakes and ensuing tsunami. ABC has some remarkable stories. “The people here show what has always been at the heart of the Japanese culture. Reporter: ‘You need the food! You need the food!’ Translator: ‘Oh, we are fine, we have enough for ourselves, we would like to share.’” “And something else astonishing after a disaster, not a single reported case of looting in a country of 128 million people. Instead, we saw astonishing patience and order.” The unusual calm made a blogger for The Telegraph ask, “Why do some cultures react to disaster by reverting to everyone for himself, but others – especially the Japanese – display altruism even in adversity?” A Columbia University professor says it’s because Japan has a strong “communitarian spirit.” He told CNN, “Order is seen as coming from the group and from the community as a sort of evening out of various individual needs.” Despite the notion of the common good, a writer for American Thinker explains children learn respect for others’ possessions at a very early age. “Most contemporary Japanese have internalized a deep respect for private property ... When a child finds a small item belonging to another person, even a one yen coin, a parent takes the child to the local koban [or police station] and reports lost property.” Unfortunately, the discussion about Japan has spurred racist comments in the blogosphere. Mentioning ruthless looting in New Orleans after Katrina, some explained the lack of crime in Japan by pointing out the lack of racial diversity in the country. But a blogger for the Washington Times disagrees saying, “Japanese culture hasn't revealed itself as a superior culture, just one that's well suited to maintaining public order immediately after a major disaster. [...] Whatever the reasons [for no looting], they speak to the variety of cultures and institutions in this world. They shouldn't serve as excuses to gloat or to damn diversity.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
969
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1:41
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Initial reports claimed radioactive water found in Japan’s damaged reactor 2 were not 10,000 times above normal like previously claimed, but rather, 10-million times the normal level. “...these levels are 10-million times higher...” (Video Source: CNN) “The levels now are 10 million times higher than normal.” (Video Source: WFAA) “Tests are coming in at 10-million times the normal level in water...” (Video Source: KCRA) “In one unit, the radiation is 10 million times higher than it is during normal operation.” (Video Source: KNTV) The media was quick to notice- there’s a big difference between 10,000 and 10 million. So who got it wrong...and why? “The power company TEPCO has came out and said simply a very short statement. ‘The number is not credible. It's a mistake. We’re very sorry.’” (Video Source: KGO) “We can’t be sure exactly how they got it wrong, and we can’t be 100% certain at this point that they did.” (Video Source: BBC) The Daily Mail says the mistake gives more ammo to those opposed to how the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, is handling the cleanup. “[C]ritics of the way the nuclear crisis is being handled said that if an error in the readings had been made it proved the Tokyo Electric Company had lost control and were making ‘one mistake after another’.” And MSNBC reports- Japanese officials are angry at TEPCO for keeping secrets. “...but were angered by news that the plants owner, TEPCO, knew radioactive water was gathering in at least one of the reactors, but didn’t disclose it until after three workers were exposed.” Erroneous reports aside--some are just asking one question: what’s in Japan’s future? A writer for the NASDAQ website says...nothing good. “Demand for Japanese products will diminish as fear of radiation keep consumers from buying, even if they've been declared safe by the Japanese or American governments. It's the way all people react when they don't know exactly what the truth is or fear the worst.” Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
5 Apr 2011
285
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2:38
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR Megan Murphy You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy With fears of a catastrophic melt-down still resonating and the discovery of plutonium now hitting headlines -- media outlets wonder -- is the Japanese government doing all it can to battle its nuclear crisis? “Highly radioactive water has been found for the first time outside one of the reactor buildings at the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant, adding to the mounting problems, officials have also detected plutonium in the soil at the plant.” (Video: Times Now) The Japanese government itself -- continues to insist -- there’s nothing to fear. “Officials insist the plutonium does not pose a health threat. In fact, some of it is decades-old residue from nuclear weapons testing. The latest setbacks are fueling a collapse of confidence in the government’s handling of the nuclear crisis.” (Video: CBS) The New York Post says Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant managers are downplaying the discovery of plutonium. “Plutonium breaks down very slowly and can remain dangerously radioactive for hundreds of thousands of years. The plutonium discovery, from samples taken a week ago, was the latest in a string of sky-is-falling updates that has put Japan and much of the world on edge.” A Japanese government spokesman calls the situation a “delicate balancing act” - as workers try to cool overheating reactors, but at the same time contaminate the water. In an article in The Guardian, a nuclear safety expert says, the Japanese government is sending out mixed signals. "What is fundamentally disturbing the public is reports of drinking water one day being above some limit, and then a day or two later it's suddenly safe to drink. People don't know if the first instance was alarmist or whether the second one was untrue...” Japan’s Prime Minister has put the country on “maximum alert”. MSNBC reports hopes are fading. “It’s hard because a workable solution to get control of the reactors has yet to be reached. The government spokesman simply called it a delicate balancing act, but offered little in the way of any new plan to attack the problem.” ...but the Financial Post argues the simple fear of radiation can be more damaging than the radiation itself--and reports harm in small doses is just a theory, while harm from fear is proven. “The incalculable harm that came of the panic that accompanied Chernobyl cannot be undone. Some 336,000 people in the vicinity of Chernobyl were evacuated from their homes and workplaces, most of them becoming impoverished as a result ... with an epidemic of afflictions among the evacuees that included depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug abuse, terminations of wanted pregnancies, and suicides.” Japan’s Prime Minister says the situation is still quote “unpredictable”. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
5 Apr 2011
1298
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2:25
BY DAN CORNFIELD ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. It has been twenty-five years since the tragedy at Chernobyl Nuclear power plant. Scientists, world leaders, and some witnesses of the chaos look back and ahead on the 25th Anniversary. NPR’s David Greene spoke with one man who was part of the emergency crew that fought the fire in Chernobyl in 1986. "A quarter-century later, no one knows what their heroism cost. Of the 20 men in Kotlyar's fire brigade, four have died. One man had a brain tumor, another leukemia. And Kotlyar is convinced at least that those two died because of radiation." Memorials were held Tuesday across Eastern Europe for those who died. But in the wake of the recent nuclear crisis in Japan, Aljazeera reports the issues reach further than the medical risks of radiation. The report reflects the delayed alarms following the original explosion and the controversial care given to those affected ever since. "It cast a dark shadow over humanity, one unseen since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. But, unlike Japan's Fukushima nuclear crisis, Chernobyl's real lesson is not about nuclear-plant safety. It is about official arrogance and indifference to suffering, and a cult of secrecy that allows information to be shared only among a narrow elite obsessed with stability.” Russian President Dimitry Medvedev announced his plan to increase security of nuclear power stations at the G8 summit this May. The sentiment reflects the hopes of Ukrainian leaders to continue to use nuclear power safely. “Ukrainian authorities are optimistic about the future of nuclear energy. Four plants with 15 reactors produce nearly half the country’s electricity. Controversially, the plan is to build a dozen more in the next 20 years.” But while some look forward, PBS’s Miles O’Brien points out the Chernobyl cleanup is far from over. "Ukraine is asking the west for $800 million to pay for a new shelter over the old sarcophagus that would last 100 years. Beneath it is all is a molten witch's brew of radioactive isotopes, including plutonium, with a half-life of 24,000 years.. Do you think human beings are capable of keeping this thing safe for tens of thousands of years?" Gennadi Milinevsky: "If he covers it, will try to keep it safe. But this place, this area will be still not good for life." Miles O'Brien: "Forever?" Gennadi Milinevsky: "Yes. Forever, yes." Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
30 Apr 2011
1078
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2:07
The U.S. women's World Cup team will play against Japan on Sunday, a formidable opponent dubbed the "sentimental favorite" for helping lift spirits back home after a devastating earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis. The game starts at 2:45 p.m. ET.
17 Jul 2011
9541
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