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0:51
O balanço da participação de Marco Fortes no lançamento do peso nos Jogos Olímpicos de 2008
9 Feb 2009
2080
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0:35
Digite um nome: Welisson Silva, único representante brasileiro no levantamento de peso, quase deixa o halteres cair em seu pescoço
27 Aug 2008
4569
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0:38
Boccia can be played by individuals, pairs, or teams of three. The aim of the game is to throw leather balls - coloured red or blue (which side gets which is determined by a coin toss) - as close as they can to a white target ball, or jack. The jack is thrown first, then each side takes turns to propel their ball towards the jack. The balls can be moved with hands, feet, or, if the competitor's disability is severe, with an assistive device. At the end of each round, or end, the referee measures the distance of the balls closest to the jack, and awards points accordingly - one point for each ball that is closer to the jack than the opponent's closest ball. The team/player with the highest number of points at the end of play is the winner. The number of ends and balls in each end depends on the side makeup. Individual competition consists of four ends and six balls per player per end, whilst paired competition is four ends and six balls per pair per end (three per player). Team competition is six ends, and six balls per team per end (two per player). Boccia (pronounced [ˡbɒtʃə], BOCH-ə) is a sport for athletes with a disability. Similar to bocce, it is designed to be played by people with cerebral palsy and other locomotor disabilities affecting motor skills. It is a Paralympic sport, played in over forty countries worldwide. Boccia is governed by the Cerebral Palsy International Sport and Recreation Association. It is a sport at the Summer Paralympic Games, first included at the New York games in 1984. It is one of three Paralympic sports that have no counterpart in the Olympic program. O que é o Boccia? Boccia é um jogo de lançamento de bolas, inspirado num jogo praticado na antiga Grécia do qual descenderam jogos tão distintos como o bowling e a petanca.O Boccia foi originalmente concebido para ser jogado por pessoas com paralisia cerebral, mas tornou-se tão popular que hoje em dia é praticado por muitas outras pessoas.A popularidade deste jogo alastrou de tal forma por todo o mundo, que o Boccia ganhou dimensões de desporto federado num grande número de países.Em 1984, o Boccia foi reconhecido como modalidade paralímpica e é uma das mais disputada a nível das competições internacionais, desde a Dinamarca à Nova Zelândia. Como se joga o Boccia? Boccia é um jogo de pavilhão que pode ser jogado em singulares, pares ou em equipas e 3 jogadores, O campo de jogo tem 12,5 metros de comprimento por 6 de largura. Cada jogador ou equipa dispõe de 6 bolas vermelhas para uma equipa e 6 azuis para a equipa contrária. Existe ainda uma bola branca (bola alvo), e que é atirada, à vez, por cada uma das equipas, seguindo-se as bolas de cor. O objectivo é lançar as bolas de cor o mais próximo possível da bola branca. Cada jogo possui quatro parciais nos jogo de singulares ou pares e seis parciais nos jogos de equipas.Os pontos contam-se no final de cada parcial, sendo atribuído um ponto por cada bola que esteja mais próxima da bola branca até ser encontrada a primeira do adversário.Boccia can be played on a recreational or competitive basis. Competitions are organized locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. The international competition calendar is based on the Summer Paralympic Games quadrennial, with international regional championships in the first year, world championships in the second year, world cup, in the third year, and the Paralympic games in the fourth year. There are approximately 200 internationally-ranked boccia players. Athletes from 29 countries attended the 2006 Boccia World Championships, and 21 countries participated in the team competition. The Iberian countries have conquered most of the medals as both Portugal and Spain dominate the sport. 179 athletes from 24 countries and regions attended the 2007 Boccia World Cup during May 9-19, 2007 in Vancouver, BC, Canada[1] for their last opportunity for classification and achieve international ranking for the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing
3 Dec 2008
3115
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2:04
The Olympic Games is an international multi-sport event established for both summer and winter games. There have been two generations of the Olympic Games; the first were the Ancient Olympic Games (Greek: Ολυμπιακοί Αγώνες; [Olympiakoi Agones] (help·info)) held at Olympia, Greece. The second, known as the Modern Olympic Movement, were first held in 1896, in Athens, Greece. The modern Olympics feature the Summer Games and Winter Games. The Paralympic and Youth Olympic Games are variations on the Modern Olympic Movement. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894 on the initiative of a French nobleman, Pierre Frédy, Baron de Coubertin. His vision was to bring together amateur athletes from around the world to compete in a variety of events. The IOC has become the governing body of the "Olympic Movement," a conglomeration of sporting federations that are responsible for the organization of the Games. The evolution of the Olympic Movement has forced the IOC to change Coubertin's timehonored ideals. The original vision of the pure amateur athlete had to change under the pressure of corporate sponsorships and political regimes intent on the creation of sports "dynasties". Participation in the Games has increased to the point that nearly every nation on earth is represented. This growth has created numerous challenges; including political boycotts, the use of performance enhancing drugs, bribery of officials, and terrorism. While the Olympic Movement is forced to address issues never before conceived by Coubertin, the Olympics continue to grow in the face of these challenges. The Games encompass many rituals and symbols that were established during their infancy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most of these traditions are displayed in the opening and closing ceremonies, and the medal presentations. Despite the complexity of the current modern Games, the focus remains on the Olympic motto: Citius Altius Fortius - Faster, Higher, Stronger.Various traditional elements frame the Closing Ceremonies of an Olympic Games, which take place after all athletic events have concluded. Flag bearers from each participating country enter the stadium in single file, behind them march all of the athletes without any distinction or grouping by nationality a tradition that began during the 1956 Summer Olympics at the suggestion of Melbourne schoolboy John Ian Wing, who thought it would be a way of bringing the athletes of the world together as "one nation."Currently, the Olympic program consists of 35 sports, 53 disciplines and more than 400 events. The Summer Olympic program includes 28 sports with 38 disciplines, and the Winter Olympic program is comprised of 7 sports with 15 disciplines.[57] There were 9 sports on the original Olympic program in 1896: athletics, cycling, fencing, gymnastics, weightlifting, shooting, swimming, tennis, and wrestling. If the 1896 rowing events had not been cancelled due to bad weather, they would have been included in this list as well.[58] Of the 15 disciplines in 7 sports featured at the most recent Winter Olympics; cross country skiing, figure skating, ice hockey, Nordic combined, ski jumping, and speed skating have been on the program at all Winter Olympics. In addition, figure skating made its debut at the London Summer Olympics of 1908 and ice hockey was first contested at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp before the introduction of a separate Winter Games.Currently, the Olympic program consists of 35 sports, 53 disciplines and more than 400 events. The Summer Olympic program includes 28 sports with 38 disciplines, and the Winter Olympic program is comprised of 7 sports with 15 disciplines.[57] There were 9 sports on the original Olympic program in 1896: athletics, cycling, fencing, gymnastics, weightlifting, shooting, swimming, tennis, and wrestling. If the 1896 rowing events had not been cancelled due to bad weather, they would have been included in this list as well.Of the 15 disciplines in 7 sports featured at the most recent Winter Olympics; cross country skiing, figure skating, ice hockey, Nordic combined, ski jumping, and speed skating have been on the program at all Winter Olympics. In addition, figure skating made its debut at the London Summer Olympics of 1908 and ice hockey was first contested at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp before the introduction of a separate Winter Games.
20 Oct 2009
1855
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2:32:39
Starring : Charlton Heston-Ava Gardner and David Niven
14 Nov 2011
8799
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2:41
Triatlo - Medalha de Prata - Pequim
22 Aug 2008
1638
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1:01
Spot publicitário da 'Nike' com Vanessa Fernandes.
21 Aug 2008
2929
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1:15
Nelson Évora conquista o Ouro no jogos olímpicos...
25 Sep 2008
1317
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1:27
The Olympic Games is an international multi-sport event established for both summer and winter games. There have been two generations of the Olympic Games; the first were the Ancient Olympic Games (Greek: Ολυμπιακοί Αγώνες; [Olympiakoi Agones] (help·info)) held at Olympia, Greece. The second, known as the Modern Olympic Movement, were first held in 1896, in Athens, Greece. The modern Olympics feature the Summer Games and Winter Games. The Paralympic and Youth Olympic Games are variations on the Modern Olympic Movement. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894 on the initiative of a French nobleman, Pierre Frédy, Baron de Coubertin. His vision was to bring together amateur athletes from around the world to compete in a variety of events. The IOC has become the governing body of the "Olympic Movement," a conglomeration of sporting federations that are responsible for the organization of the Games. The evolution of the Olympic Movement has forced the IOC to change Coubertin's timehonored ideals. The original vision of the pure amateur athlete had to change under the pressure of corporate sponsorships and political regimes intent on the creation of sports "dynasties". Participation in the Games has increased to the point that nearly every nation on earth is represented. This growth has created numerous challenges; including political boycotts, the use of performance enhancing drugs, bribery of officials, and terrorism. While the Olympic Movement is forced to address issues never before conceived by Coubertin, the Olympics continue to grow in the face of these challenges. The Games encompass many rituals and symbols that were established during their infancy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most of these traditions are displayed in the opening and closing ceremonies, and the medal presentations. Despite the complexity of the current modern Games, the focus remains on the Olympic motto: Citius Altius Fortius - Faster, Higher, Stronger.There are many myths surrounding the origin of the ancient Olympic Games; the most popular of which identifies Heracles and his father Zeus as the progenitors of the Games. According to the legend, Zeus held sporting events in honor of his defeat of Cronus, and succession to the throne of heaven. Heracles, being his eldest son, defeated his brothers in a running race and was crowned with a wreath of wild olive branches. It is Heracles who first called the games Olympic, and established the custom of holding them every 4 years.[1] The legend diverges at this point. One popular story claims that after Heracles completed his 12 labors, he went on to build the Olympic stadium and surrounding buildings as an honor to Zeus. After the stadium was complete, he walked in a straight line for 200 strides and called this distance a "stadion" (Greek: στάδιον, Latin: stadium, "stage"), which later also became a unit of distance. Another myth associates the first Games with the ancient Greek concept of Olympic truce (ἐκεχειρία, ekecheiria). The most widely held estimate for the inception of the Ancient Olympics is 776 BC.[2] From then on, the Olympic Games quickly became very important throughout ancient Greece. They reached their zenith in the 6th and 5th centuries BC. The Olympics were of fundamental religious importance. They featured sport events and ritual sacrifices honoring both Zeus (whose colossal statue stood at Olympia), and Pelops, divine hero and mythical king of Olympia. Pelops was famous for his legendary chariot races with King Oenomaus of Pisatis.[3] The number of events increased to twenty and the celebration spanned several days. Winners of the events were admired and immortalized in poems and statues.[4] The Games were held every four years, known as an Olympiad. The Greeks used Olympiads as one of their units of time measurement. Gradually the Games declined in importance as the Romans gained power in Greece. In 393 AD Emperor Theodosius I proclaimed Christianity the religion of the Empire. He banned the Olympic Games, which were seen as a pagan festival. [5] The Olympics were not seen again until their rebirth 1,500 years later.Currently, the Olympic program consists of 35 sports, 53 disciplines and more than 400 events. The Summer Olympic program includes 28 sports with 38 disciplines, and the Winter Olympic program is comprised of 7 sports with 15 disciplines.[60] There were 9 sports on the original Olympic program in 1896: athletics, cycling, fencing, gymnastics, weightlifting, shooting, swimming, tennis, and wrestling. If the 1896 rowing events had not been cancelled due to bad weather, they would have been included in this list as well.cross country skiing, figure skating, ice hockey, Nordic combined, ski jumping, and speed skating
28 Nov 2008
2301
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2:15
(BEIJING, August 24) -- The Games of the 29th Olympiad are finally over and concluded with 12 finals including a new Olympic record in the Men's Marathon, China and Mongolia collecting their first-ever Olympic Boxing medals and Russia retaining its Rhythmic Gymnastics All Around crown.But to most observers there was only one question that remained to be answered before the veil came down on Beijing 2008: could Team USA redeem their country's wounded pride at missing the Men's Basketball gold medal in Athens four years ago? Indeed, even the star-studded NBA players in their ironically monikered "redeem team" joked they'd better not bother going home unless they had nice new gold medals safely tucked inside their suitcases few major sports, if any, have one nation in the psychological grip that basketball has over the US public.And the US Women's team, led by Lisa Leslie who scooped her fourth and almost certainly final consecutive gold medal, also retained their Women's Basketball title yesterday. So there was some pressure on the boys.Redeemers, dreamers, daydream believers, call them what you will, today they were simply winners -- and Beijing 2008, alongside the big name footballers and tennis players who came here, was all the richer for having these major sporting stars in its midst.They responded magnificently by weighing in with 118 points to Spain's 107. Not that it was ever a walk in the park against a determined Spanish team which, just like China had done in the US team's opening encounter of the Games, led early on.But after a shaky start, Team USA soon built a seven point advantage by the end of the first quarter, then a half time of lead 69-61.Inspired by Marc Gasol, Spain chipped away the US lead in the third and fourth quarters, reducing the deficit to just four points at one stage, but the "redeemers" pulled away for an 11 point victory margin that reflected the overall balance of the game. As you might expect, Kobe Bryant and Dwyane Wade were the top scorers for Team USA, weighing in with 20 and 27 points each. Afterwards, Lebron James described the joy within the Team USA camp: "It means everything to me. We're the number one team. We've been so blessed with this opportunity. It's so rewarding to see your hard work pay off. This is something I've waited for, for four years." Earlier, defending Olympic champion Argentina won the bronze medal after a comfortable victory against Lithuania 87-75 with Carlos Delfino top-scoring with 20 points for Argentina.And there was plenty of other action on Day 16. Samuel Kamau Wansiru set a new Olympic record in the final Athletics event of the Games -- the Men's Marathon -- in which all the medals went to African runners. Wansiru's victory in two hours and 6.32 minutes was Keyna's first Olympic Men's Marathon win and smashed Carlos Lopes' 24-year-old previous record of two hours and 9:21 minutes, set by the Portuguese runner at the 1984 Olympics. Jaouad Gharib from Morocco also broke the former record to take silver in two hours and 7.16 minutes, with Ethiopia's Tsegay Kebede crossing the finish line in two hours and 10 minutes to claim the bronze.China collected its 50th gold medal of the Games and its first-ever Olympic Boxing gold thanks to two-time world Light-flyweight champion Zou Shiming, who defeated Serdamba Purevdorj by catching the Mongolian with a combination of punches in the first round, to earn one point. The bout ended abruptly in the second round with Purevdorj retiring with a shoulder injury.A second Boxing gold soon came China's way with Zou followed onto the podium by Zhang Xiaoping, who won the Light-heavyweight final by defeating Kenny Egan of Ireland, 11-7.China was denied a third win though, as Roberto Cammarelle of Italy beat Zhang Zhilei to win the Super-Heavyweight gold.Mongolia didn't have long to wait to get over the disappointment of Purevdorj's defeat -- Badar-Uugan Enkhbat grabbed its first-ever Boxing gold by out pointing Yankiel Leon Alarcon of Cuba 16-5 to win the Bantamweight gold and Cuba left the Boxing tournament without a gold medal after Carlos Banteaux Suarez was easily defeated by Kazakhstan's Bakhyt Sarsekbayev 18-9 in the welterweight gold medal final.Alexey Tishchenko of Russia beat Daouda Sow of France 11-9 to win the Lightweight gold for his second straight Olympic gold medal, having won in the Featherweight class at Athens 2004.
29 Jul 2009
1309
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0:22
(BEIJING, September 11) -- China won its third consecutive match to remain along at the top of the table in another day of action for the Football 5-a-side Tournament of the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Green Hockey Stadium, Pitch 2, on Thursday, September 11. The day started with a hard-fought classic encounter between Argentina and Brazil, in which no team managed to score, despite Brazil having the best chances. The match was dominated by both defensive units and had all the ingredients of a football's most heated rivalry. Later on, China's captain Li Xiaoqiang scored from the penalty spot to secure the three points against the Republic of Korea, keeping the host team's perfect record in tact and taking a huge step towards qualification to the gold medal match. In the day's final match, Great Britain was ahead with a goal from David Clarke, but Spain came back from behind to score three goals in the second half, courtesy of Alfredo Cuadrado, Marcelo Rosado and Antonio Martin. With these results, China leads the rankings with nine points, followed by Brazil with seven, Argentina with four, Great Britain and Spain with three and the ROK with no points. The next day of action for Football 5-a-side will be Saturday, September 13, when China will meet Spain, Great Britain will face Brazil and Argentina will play the ROK.The Men's Football 5-a-Side preliminary match between Argentina and Brazil of the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games took place at Olympic Green Hockey Stadium in Beijing on September 11, 2008. The match ended in a 0-0 draw.(BEIJING, September 17) -- Brazil defended its Football 5-a-Side gold medal from four years ago by beating China 2-1 in the final, while Argentina overcame Spain on penalties to finish with bronze on Pitch 2 of the Olympic Green Hockey Stadium on Wednesday. Through a last minute strike by Marcos Felipe, Brazil won a dramatic gold medal match after China's Wang Yafeng scored a goal in the first half and put Brazil one goal behind. Ricardo Alves, one of the stars of the tournament, leveled the scoring early in the second half. Silver medalist at the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games, Argentina won the bronze medal after a nerve-racking match against Spain. Spain went ahead in the first minute through a strike by Antonio Jesus Martin. Silvio Velo scored his sixth goal of the tournament with only eight minutes to go and forced the game to go to penalties. Defender Diego Cerega was the only player who managed to score in the shootout as Spain failed to retain the bronze medal it won four years ago. Earlier on, Great Britain defeated the Republic of Korea to finish fifth in the competition. Great Britain equalized just before the end of the match and then won it on penalties with David Clarke scoring the only goal.Argentina beat Spain 2-1 in the Football 5-a-Side bronze medal match during the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing on September 17, 2008.
8 Mar 2009
2088
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1:11
Cycling is the use of bicycles, or - less commonly - unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. It is done on roads and paths, across open country or even over snow and ice (icebiking).As a sport, cycling is governed internationally by the Union Cycliste Internationale in Switzerland (for upright bicycles) and by the International Human Powered Vehicle Association (for other HPVs, or human-powered vehicles). Cycling for transport and touring is promoted on a European level by the European Cyclists' Federation, with associated members from Great Britain, Japan and elsewhere. Regular conferences on cycling for transport are held under the auspices of Velo City; global conferences are coordinated by Velo Mondia.Mountain biking grew in the late 20th century, including recreation and racing. It emphasises riding special cycles with high gear ratios over rough paths, special obstacle courses or directly cross country. While very popular as a sport, it has also been criticised for damaging the countryside.Shortly after the introduction of bicycles, competitions developed independently in many parts of the world. Early races involving boneshaker style bicycles were predictably fraught with injuries. Large races became popular during the 1890s "Golden Age of Cycling", with events across Europe, and in the U.S. and Japan as well. At one point, almost every major city in the US had a velodrome or two for track racing events. However since the middle of the 20th century cycling has become a minority sport in the US whilst in Continental Europe it continues to be a major sport, particularly in France, Belgium, Italy and Spain. The most famous of all bicycle races is the Tour de France. This began in 1903, and continues to capture the attention of the sporting world.The physical exercise gained from cycling is generally linked with increased health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization, physical inactivity is second only to tobacco smoking as a health risk in developed countries, and this is associated with many tens of billions of dollars of healthcare costs.[10] The WHO's report[11] suggests that increasing physical activity is a public health 'best buy', and that cycling is a 'highly suitable activity' for this purpose. The charity Sustrans reports that investment in cycling provision can give a 20:1 return from health and other benefits.[12] It has been estimated that, on average, approximately 20 life-years are gained from the health benefits of road bicycling for every life-year lost through injury.One concern often expressed (both by non-cyclists and some cyclists) is the thought that riding in traffic exposes the cyclist to higher levels of air pollution, especially if he travels on or along busy roads. This has been shown to be untrue, as the pollutant and irritant count within cars is consistently higher,[29] (presumably because of limited circulation of air within the car and due to the air intake being directly in the stream of other traffic).Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous. In 1885, J.K. Starley of England devised the more modern bike with a chain and gearing to allow the wheels to be of equal size. Although bicycle races had been held on the old "penny farthings", the new bikes stimulated the growth of bicycle racing as a sport.Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous.Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous.
14 Jun 2009
3571
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3:22
Cycling is the use of bicycles, or - less commonly - unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. It is done on roads and paths, across open country or even over snow and ice (icebiking).As a sport, cycling is governed internationally by the Union Cycliste Internationale in Switzerland (for upright bicycles) and by the International Human Powered Vehicle Association (for other HPVs, or human-powered vehicles). Cycling for transport and touring is promoted on a European level by the European Cyclists' Federation, with associated members from Great Britain, Japan and elsewhere. Regular conferences on cycling for transport are held under the auspices of Velo City; global conferences are coordinated by Velo Mondia.Mountain biking grew in the late 20th century, including recreation and racing. It emphasises riding special cycles with high gear ratios over rough paths, special obstacle courses or directly cross country. While very popular as a sport, it has also been criticised for damaging the countryside.Shortly after the introduction of bicycles, competitions developed independently in many parts of the world. Early races involving boneshaker style bicycles were predictably fraught with injuries. Large races became popular during the 1890s "Golden Age of Cycling", with events across Europe, and in the U.S. and Japan as well. At one point, almost every major city in the US had a velodrome or two for track racing events. However since the middle of the 20th century cycling has become a minority sport in the US whilst in Continental Europe it continues to be a major sport, particularly in France, Belgium, Italy and Spain. The most famous of all bicycle races is the Tour de France. This began in 1903, and continues to capture the attention of the sporting world.The physical exercise gained from cycling is generally linked with increased health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization, physical inactivity is second only to tobacco smoking as a health risk in developed countries, and this is associated with many tens of billions of dollars of healthcare costs.[10] The WHO's report[11] suggests that increasing physical activity is a public health 'best buy', and that cycling is a 'highly suitable activity' for this purpose. The charity Sustrans reports that investment in cycling provision can give a 20:1 return from health and other benefits.[12] It has been estimated that, on average, approximately 20 life-years are gained from the health benefits of road bicycling for every life-year lost through injury.One concern often expressed (both by non-cyclists and some cyclists) is the thought that riding in traffic exposes the cyclist to higher levels of air pollution, especially if he travels on or along busy roads. This has been shown to be untrue, as the pollutant and irritant count within cars is consistently higher,[29] (presumably because of limited circulation of air within the car and due to the air intake being directly in the stream of other traffic).Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous. In 1885, J.K. Starley of England devised the more modern bike with a chain and gearing to allow the wheels to be of equal size. Although bicycle races had been held on the old "penny farthings", the new bikes stimulated the growth of bicycle racing as a sport.Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous.Bicycles were first developed in 1817 and have long since been used as a form of transport. Originally, the front wheel was much larger than the rear wheel, and the rider was elevated a great deal, making them difficult to control and very dangerous.
9 Apr 2010
3375
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2:13
A seleção brasileira feminima de vôlei acaba de ganhar a medalha de ouro nos jogos de Pequim ao derrotar a seleção dos Estados Unidos por três sets a um. Dos 25 setes disputados em oito jogos, a seleção só perdeu um. Para o Brasil, essa foi a olimpíada das mulheres.
24 Aug 2008
1937
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1:12
China (中國 em chinês tradicional, 中国 em chinês simplificado, Zhōngguó no sistema pinyin e Chung-kuo no sistema Wade-Giles)[1] é uma antiga unidade histórica, cultural e geográfica situada na parte continental do leste da Ásia, incluindo algumas ilhas que desde 1949 foram divididas entre a República Popular da China (que inclui a China continental, Hong Kong e Macau) e a República da China (que inclui Taiwan e algumas ilhas da província de Fujian). A palavra China costuma referir-se a regiões que, em termos mais específicos não fazem parte dela, como é o caso da Manchúria, da Mongólia Interior, o Tibete e Xinjiang (ver mapa das divisões da China). Nos meios de comunicação ocidentais, China refere-se, normalmente, à República Popular da China, enquanto que Taiwan se refere à República da China. Muitas vezes, em termos informais, especialmente entre chineses e ingleses (no contexto do mundo dos negócios), a Grande região da China (大中华地區) refere-se ao sentido mais lato, tal como foi apresentado no parágrafo anterior. Na sua história, as capitais da China situavam-se, essencialmente, no leste. As quatro capitais mais citadas são Nanquim (Nanjing), Pequim (Beijing), Xian, e Luoyang. As línguas oficiais foram mudando ao longo da sua extensa história, (incluindo línguas entretanto desaparecidas), incluindo o mongol, o manchu e os vários dialetos do chinês, entre os quais o mandarim (em chinês Hanyu, pronunciado haN ü, ou seja, /h/ como hat, em inglês, e /ü/ como o som do "u" francês) e o cantonês. A palavra portuguesa "China", bem como o prefixo associado, "sino-", derivam, provavelmente, de Qin (pronúncia "tchim", onde o "q" é pronunciado como um alveopalatal, como o "ch" na palavra inglesa chest). Há quem defenda, no entanto, que China derive da palavra chinesa para chá (igual à palavra em português que, aliás, tem a sua origem etimológica no próprio mandarim) ou, mesmo, de "seda" (note-se, em jeito de nota de rodapé, que é vulgar a associação entre a palavra china e os produtos que têm aí a sua origem: china, em português, também pode significar porcelana) . Qualquer que seja, contudo, a origem da palavra "China" (que é uma palavra europeia, não existindo em qualquer das línguas sino-tibetanas) foi-se perdendo à medida que era filtrada pelos vários povos atravessados pela Rota da Seda, que fazia a primeira ligação histórica estável entre esta região asiática e a Europa.China (traditional Chinese: 中國; simplified Chinese: 中国; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguó; Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōngguó (help·info); Wade-Giles (Mandarin): Chung¹kuo²) is a cultural region, an ancient civilization, and, depending on perspective, a national or multinational entity extending over a large area in East Asia. China has one of the world's oldest people and continuous civilizations, consisting of states and cultures dating back more than six millennia. It has the world's longest continuously used written language system, and is the source of many major inventions, such as what the British scholar and biochemist Joseph Needham called the "four great inventions of Ancient China": paper, the compass, gunpowder, and printing. Historically, China's cultural sphere has extended across East Asia as a whole, with Chinese religion, customs, and writing systems being adopted to varying degrees by neighbors such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam. The last Chinese Civil War has resulted in two political entities using the name China: * the People's Republic of China (PRC), commonly known as China, has control over mainland China, and the largely self-governing territories of Hong Kong (since 1997) and Macau (since 1999). * the Republic of China (ROC), commonly known as Taiwan, has control over the islands of Taiwan, Pescadores, Kinmen, and Matsu.English and many other languages use various forms of the name "China" and the prefix "Sino-" or "Sin-". These forms are thought to derive from the name of the Qin Dynasty that first unified the country (221206 BCE). The pronunciation of "Qin" is similar to the phonetic "cheen", which is considered the possible root of the word "China".China is known as 'Zhōngguó' in Mandarin and pinyin (中國 in traditional chinese or 中国 in simplified chinese). The character zhōng means "middle" or central; the letter, guó, means land, kingdom or country. An appropriate English translation would be "middle kingdom".Ancient China was one of the earliest centers of human civilization. Chinese civilization was also one of the few to invent writing independently, the others being Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley Civilization, the Mayan civilization, the Minoan Civilization of ancient Greece, and Ancient Egypt.
18 Dec 2008
1644
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4:12
Chegada da maratona de Pequim
27 Feb 2009
3198
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