Results for: perry-farrell Search Results
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0:32
Perry Farrell at Musicians Institute Graduate
23 Mar 2009
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1:51
Perry Ferrell, of Janes Addiction talks about his interest in Tony Hawks foundation, and his love for skateboarding. Distributed by Tubemogul.
23 Oct 2010
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2:20
I Got Shotgun's Anna interviews music's hottest acts following the Grammy's
14 Jun 2007
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3:28
Video: excerpt from kahunahawaii clip "BALI: Exotic Kecak Cult Monkey Dance Ritual"music: Porno For Pyros - Bali Eyes metacafe says: "controversial title". It's bullshit, of course.
6 Dec 2009
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5:09
Jane's Addiction "Jane Says" Lollapalooza with Joe Perry
17 Jan 2010
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1:16
micrometraje de nicolas chirokoff Música de Wakal Dedicado a mi hija Maina Chirokoff Keravis © Dedicace mexico - Wakal - 2008 Nicolas Chirokoff nació en París, Francia, en 1967. Estudió en la Escuela de Bellas Artes de Rennes, Francia. En Los años 80' participó en obras de teatro haciendo escenografías proyectadas en 8 y 16 mm con la compañia TCR2. Se instaló en Mexico en 97, año en el cual hizó su primeras proyecciones para eventos electrónicos con el colectivo Latin Freak. Después de unos años como diseñador gráfico regresó a la video proyección en el 2002. Su trabajo se presentó en muestras de carácter cultural y en eventos electrónicos en México, Francia, Canada, Argentina, Colombia, Italia, Portugal y Japón. Praticipó en festivales como Vidarte (DF, 1999), Puerta de las Americas (DF, 2004), III Encuentro de Sonidos electronicos (Bogota, 2004), Transmusicales de Rennes(Francia, 2004), Fotografest (Mx, 2005), la Fiesta de la Música (DF, 2004 y 2005), 2do Festival Diego Rivera (DF, 2005), el Festival de cine y video Imagineria Audiovisual de la Frontera IAF (Tijuana, 2005), el Blog on-Arthur Rimbaud (Italia, 2005), la Lunas del Auditorio (DF, 2006),el MundoLatino (Guada, Mx, 2006), el Manisfest (DF, 2005 y 2007), el Latin American Film Festival (Vancouver, 2006), el II Festival de videopoesia Internacional (Argentina, 2006), el festival Alucine (Canada y Argentina, 2004, 2005, 2006 y 2007), y la Trienal de Arquitectura (Portugal, 2007) . Proyectó con músicos como Perry Farrell, Cerati, Los Clones, Muriel Moreno, Dj Ravin y con colectivos como Komfort, Nopal Beat, Nortec o el Bouddha Bar. Es integrante del grupo electrónico Wakal desde 2003, colaboró con el grupo DaPuntoBeat en 2005 y en el 2006. Participo a los espectaculos circenses Proyecto Fibonacci (Cirkodemente y 7 finger, 2007) y La Playa (Cirkodemente, 2007)entre otros.
3 Mar 2008
658
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5:08
"Cynthia Witthoft" Song: "The Difference Between Old and New Metal" The era of metal's mainstream dominance in North America came to an end in the early 1990s with the emergence of Nirvana and other grunge bands, signaling the popular breakthrough of alternative rock. Grunge acts were influenced by the heavy metal sound, but rejected the excesses of the more popular metal bands, such as their "flashy and virtuosic solos" and "appearance-driven" MTV orientation. Glam metal fell out of favor due not only to the success of grunge, but also because of the growing popularity of the more aggressive sound typified by Metallica and the post-thrash groove metal of Pantera and White Zombie. A few new, unambiguously metal bands had commercial success during the first half of the decade—Pantera's Far Beyond Driven topped the Billboard chart in 1994—but, "In the dull eyes of the mainstream, metal was dead." Some bands tried to adapt to the new musical landscape. Metallica revamped its image: the band members cut their hair and, in 1996, headlined the alternative musical festival Lollapalooza founded by Jane's Addiction singer Perry Farrell. While this prompted a backlash among some long-time fans, Metallica remained one of the most successful bands in the world into the new century Like Jane's Addiction, many of the most popular early 1990s groups with roots in heavy metal fall under the umbrella term "alternative metal." The label was applied to a wide spectrum of acts that fused metal with different styles, not all associated with alternative rock. Acts labeled alternative metal included the Seattle grunge scene's Alice in Chains and groups drawing on multiple styles: Faith No More combined their alternative rock sound with punk, funk, metal, and hip hop; Primus joined elements of funk, punk, thrash metal, and experimental music. Tool mixed metal and progressive rock; Ministry began incorporating metal into its industrial sound; and Marilyn Manson went down a similar route, while also employing shock effects of the sort popularized by Alice Cooper. Alternative metal artists, though they did not represent a cohesive scene, were united by their willingness to experiment with the metal genre and their rejection of glam metal aesthetics (with the stagecraft of Marilyn Manson and White Zombie—also identified with alt-metal—significant, if partial, exceptions). Alternative metal's mix of styles and sounds represented "the colorful results of metal opening up to face the outside world." In the mid- and late 1990s came a new wave of U.S. metal groups inspired by the alternative metal bands and their mix of genres. Dubbed "nu metal," bands such as P.O.D., Korn, Papa Roach, Limp Bizkit, Slipknot, and Linkin Park incorporated elements ranging from death metal to hip hop, often including DJs and rap-style vocals. The mix demonstrated that "pancultural metal could pay off." Nu metal gained mainstream success through heavy MTV rotation and Ozzy Osbourne's 1996 introduction of Ozzfest, which led the media to talk of a resurgence of heavy metal. That year, Korn released Life Is Peachy, the first nu metal album to reach the top 10; two years later, the band's Follow the Leader hit number 1. In 1999, Billboard noted that there were more than 500 specialty metal radio shows in the U.S., nearly three times as many as ten years before. While nu metal was widely popular early in the 2000s, traditional metal fans did not fully embrace the style. By early 2003, the movement had clearly passed its peak, though several nu metal acts, as well as bands with related styles, such as System of a Down, retained substantial followings.
10 Jun 2009
1196
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5:08
Cynthia Witthoft Song: "The Difference Between Old and New Metal" - The era of metal's mainstream dominance in North America came to an end in the early 1990s with the emergence of Nirvana and other grunge bands, signaling the popular breakthrough of alternative rock. Grunge acts were influenced by the heavy metal sound, but rejected the excesses of the more popular metal bands, such as their "flashy and virtuosic solos" and "appearance-driven" MTV orientation. Glam metal fell out of favor due not only to the success of grunge, but also because of the growing popularity of the more aggressive sound typified by Metallica and the post-thrash groove metal of Pantera and White Zombie. A few new, unambiguously metal bands had commercial success during the first half of the decade—Pantera's Far Beyond Driven topped the Billboard chart in 1994—but, "In the dull eyes of the mainstream, metal was dead." Some bands tried to adapt to the new musical landscape. Metallica revamped its image: the band members cut their hair and, in 1996, headlined the alternative musical festival Lollapalooza founded by Jane's Addiction singer Perry Farrell. While this prompted a backlash among some long-time fans, Metallica remained one of the most successful bands in the world into the new century Like Jane's Addiction, many of the most popular early 1990s groups with roots in heavy metal fall under the umbrella term "alternative metal." The label was applied to a wide spectrum of acts that fused metal with different styles, not all associated with alternative rock. Acts labeled alternative metal included the Seattle grunge scene's Alice in Chains and groups drawing on multiple styles: Faith No More combined their alternative rock sound with punk, funk, metal, and hip hop; Primus joined elements of funk, punk, thrash metal, and experimental music. Tool mixed metal and progressive rock; Ministry began incorporating metal into its industrial sound; and Marilyn Manson went down a similar route, while also employing shock effects of the sort popularized by Alice Cooper. Alternative metal artists, though they did not represent a cohesive scene, were united by their willingness to experiment with the metal genre and their rejection of glam metal aesthetics (with the stagecraft of Marilyn Manson and White Zombie—also identified with alt-metal—significant, if partial, exceptions). Alternative metal's mix of styles and sounds represented "the colorful results of metal opening up to face the outside world." In the mid- and late 1990s came a new wave of U.S. metal groups inspired by the alternative metal bands and their mix of genres. Dubbed "nu metal," bands such as P.O.D., Korn, Papa Roach, Limp Bizkit, Slipknot, and Linkin Park incorporated elements ranging from death metal to hip hop, often including DJs and rap-style vocals. The mix demonstrated that "pancultural metal could pay off." Nu metal gained mainstream success through heavy MTV rotation and Ozzy Osbourne's 1996 introduction of Ozzfest, which led the media to talk of a resurgence of heavy metal. That year, Korn released Life Is Peachy, the first nu metal album to reach the top 10; two years later, the band's Follow the Leader hit number 1. In 1999, Billboard noted that there were more than 500 specialty metal radio shows in the U.S., nearly three times as many as ten years before. While nu metal was widely popular early in the 2000s, traditional metal fans did not fully embrace the style. By early 2003, the movement had clearly passed its peak, though several nu metal acts, as well as bands with related styles, such as System of a Down, retained substantial followings. - User extra info: You forgot to mention the birth of death metal in florid,black metal in norway and experimental metal in the UK, then you have all the well know metalcore bands around now.
20 Mar 2010
3013
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9:13
A long-running fake 'feud' between actor Matt Damon and American talk show host Jimmy Kimmel has grown into a star-studded online war, with the two celebrities creating elaborate and insulting music videos ridiculing each other. The caper started 18 months ago on the Jimmy Kimmel Live, show when the host made a tradition of closing out episodes with, Apologies to Matt Damon, but we ran out of time, even though the actor was never scheduled to come on the show. The running gag continued until Damon finally appeared as a guest on Kimmel's show — only to be cut off by Kimmel as soon as he sat down. The actor unleashed a fake barrage of swear words on Kimmel and proceeded to storm off the set. His performance was so believable, many fans thought he was really upset. Finally, after months of rumoured 'bad blood' between the two, Matt Damon got him back in early February by getting Kimmel's girlfriend, Sarah Silverman, to appear in a raunchy spoof video clip titled I'm F**king Matt Damon. But the talk show host got his own back in spectacular style on Monday night by premiering his own video, I'm F**king Ben Affleck featuring a numerous major stars, including Harrison Ford, Brad Pitt, Cameron Diaz, Don Cheadle, Robin Williams, Huey Lewis, Dominic Monaghan, Josh Groban, Christina Applegate, Meat Loaf, Jane's Addiction's Perry Farrell, Lance Bass, Joan Jett, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and a gospel choir.Jimmy enjoyed every second, every morsel of [Silverman's video], but immediately began plotting his revenge, Jill Leiderman, the show's executive producer is reported to have told MTV****. The next morning, he said to me, 'I need to get Ben Affleck.' So I reached out to Ben's representation and wrote him an impassioned letter explaining the chronology and history of the Matt Damon-Jimmy Kimmel feud. Within an hour, Ben was signed on to participate. According to the MTV article, it was Affleck's idea to wrangle Harrison Ford for an appearance. Ben found out that Harrison had seen [Sarah's] video and was tickled by it, and he encouraged us to reach out to Harrison to participate, she said. They came back and told us that Harrison was interested in participating in any capacity we wanted him to — and he spent the entire day with us, shooting at the Roosevelt Hotel [in Hollywood] and then over at the recording studio. He was a trooper to be part of Jimmy's revenge.
13 Aug 2010
3365
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1:04
GORGEOUS! From the artist best known for the iconic version of Santa Baby* comes a new classic, The Christmas Song: *******itunes.apple****/us/album/the-christmas-song-chestnuts/id483212311 ***Made in New York City*** Listen to Cynthia on: *******smoothjazz****/ Known for her smoldering seasonal version of Santa Baby, actress, singer Cynthia Basinet releases a jazzy version of The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire). The beautiful Basinet is a 'Jaqueline of all trades' it seems, she keeps herself busy in the performing arts but is also a humanitarian using her music to bring public awareness to environmental issues and the importance of self-reliance... she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005 as part of the 1000 Women for the Nobel Peace Price Project. This gorgeous version of Nat King Cole's holiday nugget was arranged by Tony Bennett's arranger and pianist Lee Musiker, and while the song features A-List musicians, it's Ms. Basinet's approach to the vocals that steals the show! Warm, rich and delightful... Cynthia Basinet's version of The Christmas Song is a must have download this holiday season! ~SmoothJazz Radio Arranged by and on piano, Lee Musiker (Emmy Award-winning conductor, composer, arranger and Tony Bennett's pianist) On drums, Rick Cutler... (Currently tours w/ Liza Minnelli. Recorded w/Billy Eckstine, Perry Farrell (of Jane's Addiction) On guitar, Gary Haase! Real smooth. (Produced and written for Chaka Kahn, Celine Dion, George Benson) And Jim Hynes, playin' the haunting flugelhorn. (Member of Paul Simon's elite touring band. He has recorded with everyone from Aerosmith to Tony Bennett to Michael Jackson) Mixed and mastered, David Maurice Recorded in the Nola Recording Studios, NYC, NY
25 Nov 2011
358
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