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2:23
With the weather gods perfectly cooperating, we embarked on another Ontario excursion during the weekend of August 2 and 3, 2008. This time we headed towards southwestern Ontario. Our first stop was in St. Jacobs (the former Jakobsstettel) where we admired the various organic delicacies offered in the Farmer’s Market. Colourful peaches, cherries, zucchini, various vegetables, fresh bread and cured meats were enticing the tastebuds and the camera. Mennonite farmers were displaying their wares, sitting next to their black wooden buggies. From the market we headed into the village of St. Jacobs where we took in fascinating information about the Mennonite Story in the local Visitor Centre. Then we visited the Mill which today houses a variety of shops and galleries. Even the silos of the mill have been converted into display space. After a hearty lunch we continued on to Cambridge, an important town with impressive 19th century architecture. We admired the various churches and bridges over the Speed River and took in several performances of the Cambridge Folk Festival that was going on. Then we set off on a drive through tobacco country past the town of Simcoe to arrive at our destination for the night: Port Dover. Located on Port Erie and formerly a sleepy fishing village, Port Dover has a population of about 6,000 people and over the last few decades has become a popular getaway destination. The waterfront features an attractive pier with a lighthouse and we enjoyed our dinner at the Beachview Restaurant. Enjoying a traditional dinner of local perch and pickerel we overlooked the sandy beach and the palm trees that get planted here every spring after spending the winter safely in a greenhouse. For the night we retreated to the Clonmel Estate B&B, an impressive mansion with six guest rooms dating back to 1929. Hosts Bob and Connie Lawton graciously welcomed us and treated us to a delicious breakfast the next morning. Bob even showed me his model train set that is hidden away in the vault in the basement. The next morning another gorgeous day of bright sunshine and blue skies greeted us. We started our drive back to Toronto, and made frequent stops along the way. Our first stop was at the Spencer Gorge, part of the Niagara Escarpment, just outside of Dundas where we admired Tew’s Falls and hiked out to Dundas Peak from where we had a perfect view of the Hamilton and Dundas Valleys. Then we drove through very wealthy waterfront areas in Burlington and stopped at the Burlington Beachway where thousands of people were looking to cool off in the northwestern corner of Lake Ontario. We also took a walk around Burlington’s recently renovated waterfront and listened to a jazz trio that was playing standard favourites. After several stops along the waterfronts of Oakville and Mississauga where we glimpsed a nice distant view of the Toronto skyline we headed back into Toronto. There we capped off the evening with a delicious and filling Schnitzel dinner at the Country Style Restaurant in the Annex. Distributed by Tubemogul.
6 Sep 2008
418
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4:12
I take a look at China's population control method, the controversial "One Child Policy".
7 Sep 2008
175
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9:38
Food for People Brings Hope to Villagers in India June 13, 2007 - Just over a year ago, The Prem Rawat Foundation (TPRF) inaugurated Food for People (FFP), an innovative food initiative, in a remote area of Jharkhand, in northeastern India, where tribal people have historically struggled just to survive from day to day. Situated on six acres of land, FFP is a newly constructed, impeccably clean 10,0000-square-foot facility, equipped with a large kitchen, separate storage and food preparation rooms, a spacious dining area, and modern sanitation facilities. During its first year of operation, FFP served over 150,000 hot, nutritious indigenous meals to children and adults. Before this facility was built, children scrounged for grub worms and sought out the nests where rats store food for their young, snatching what they could for themselves. Many adults suffered from general weakness or illness and were unable to earn enough money to take care of their families. Children dropped out of school at a very early age to begin working in exchange for food. The population as a whole, generally overlooked by the efforts of larger charities, has been caught in a devastating cycle of poverty and disease, causing a high rate of infant mortality and short life expectancy. What a difference one year has made. Gaining better health from regular nutritionally balanced hot meals, many previously unemployed adults have been able to get jobs in nearby villages and are now providing their family's evening meals at home. The children are noticeably healthier as well. School attendance and children's ability to concentrate are both improving, and there is reason to expect that more young people will stay in school long enough to develop marketable skills, which will help them earn a better living. In time, they could be able to support their aging parents, as well as provide a better, more stable life for their own children. And equally important, people are beginning to feel hope that their lives can improve and that their children will have a future far better than the villagers have had for many generations. Prem Rawat's vision is straightforward and simple: if food aid can be offered while respecting local customs and the individual's dignity, adults can then take steps to earn an income and children can be educated. Everyone can have the possibility of a more stable and healthy life. From the inception of this project, The Prem Rawat Foundation has involved the villagers in numerous ways and has consulted the village elders in the development and administration of Food for People, including meal planning that is based on the recipes of their traditional food. People come to FFP from several villages within a ten- to thirty-minute walking distance. During the meals, educational TV programs are shown in their native Hindi language, introducing the children to the world beyond their village, showing people of different cultures, as well as animals and landscapes they have never even imagined existed. For many of the children and adults who visit FFP, this has been their first exposure to using modern toilets, washing their hands before eating, waiting in line for their turn to be served, and being able to count on a hot nutritious meal at least once a day, year-round. *******inspire***ntactinfo****/index.htm
19 Sep 2008
1005
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1:34
One item that cannot miss from any travel itinerary in Toronto is a visit to Chinatown and Kensington. After a long day of work on August 7, 2008 I met my European visitors downtown in front of the CHUM City Building (home of City TV). We walked westwards along the funky stores of Queen Street West and headed north on Spadina where we took in the sights of Toronto’s Fashion District. North of Dundas the flavour turned decidedly Oriental as we entered Chinatown. Colourful merchandise, fragrant fruits, the smells of seafood and the hustle and bustle of people shopping and strolling assaulted our senses. As always, we were fascinated by the various forms of fried fowl that were hanging in the store windows, naturally with heads and feet still attached. A few streets north of Spadina we headed west to check out the eclectic collection of restaurants, funky stores and multicultural food emporiums that makes up Kensington Market. One of Toronto’s oldest and most colourful neighbourhoods, the former “Jewish Market” is a National Historic Site today. Almost 60,000 Jewish residents lived here in the 1920s and 1930s and worshipped at more than 30 synagogues. After World War II most of the Jewish population relocated further north, and additional waves of diverse immigrant groups moved in. Today, people from the Caribbean, East Asia, the Azores and Latin America are well represented here and the colourful mix of restaurants and stores reflects these diverse origins. We strolled back on Dundas Street, past the newly expanding Art Gallery of Ontario, a $250+ million redevelopment designed by award-winning star architect Frank Gehry whose famous creations include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (Spain), the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago’s Millenium Park. For dinner we headed over to Baldwin Street, a small side street south of the University of Toronto that features a diverse mix of restaurants, including Italian, French, Indian, Thai and Japanese cuisine. We capped the evening off with a tasty dinner at the Gateway to India restaurant. Distributed by Tubemogul.
13 Feb 2009
967
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1:26
One item that cannot miss from any travel itinerary in Toronto is a visit to Chinatown and Kensington. After a long day of work on August 7, 2008 I met my European visitors downtown in front of the CHUM City Building (home of City TV). We walked westwards along the funky stores of Queen Street West and headed north on Spadina where we took in the sights of Toronto’s Fashion District. North of Dundas the flavour turned decidedly Oriental as we entered Chinatown. Colourful merchandise, fragrant fruits, the smells of seafood and the hustle and bustle of people shopping and strolling assaulted our senses. As always, we were fascinated by the various forms of fried fowl that were hanging in the store windows, naturally with heads and feet still attached. A few streets north of Spadina we headed west to check out the eclectic collection of restaurants, funky stores and multicultural food emporiums that makes up Kensington Market. One of Toronto’s oldest and most colourful neighbourhoods, the former “Jewish Market” is a National Historic Site today. Almost 60,000 Jewish residents lived here in the 1920s and 1930s and worshipped at more than 30 synagogues. After World War II most of the Jewish population relocated further north, and additional waves of diverse immigrant groups moved in. Today, people from the Caribbean, East Asia, the Azores and Latin America are well represented here and the colourful mix of restaurants and stores reflects these diverse origins. We strolled back on Dundas Street, past the newly expanding Art Gallery of Ontario, a $250+ million redevelopment designed by award-winning star architect Frank Gehry whose famous creations include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (Spain), the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago’s Millenium Park. For dinner we headed over to Baldwin Street, a small side street south of the University of Toronto that features a diverse mix of restaurants, including Italian, French, Indian, Thai and Japanese cuisine. We capped the evening off with a tasty dinner at the Gateway to India restaurant. Distributed by Tubemogul.
25 Feb 2010
1531
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2:46
The Explore team visits the Wolong Giant Panda Reserve near Chengdu. The most recent Chinese survey estimates there are 1,590 giant pandas in the wild, while wildlife biologists estimate between 1,000 and 2,000. China has made great progress in preserving and multiplying the population of the species in recent years.
16 Nov 2008
2629
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2:51
*******www.squidoo****/NutritionalDietarySupplement *******www.RealHealthGenius**** Over 50% of the American population is currently taking some form of a nutritional dietary supplement. On August 01, 2008, Genewize Life Sciences launched and made available for the first time a nutritional dietary supplement that is scientifically supported, affordable, and specifically formulated for you based on a Healthy Aging DNA Assessment. So, the question becomes, if a supplement is made for you based on your DNA, do lifestyle factors become irrelevant? Contact Leslie: 563-876-8129 Email InfoLesKremer**** *******www.RealHealthGenius**** genewize; genewize health sciences; genelink; genetic research; customized nutritional supplementation; nutritional health supplement; natural remedy for health problems; natural remedy and beauty product; natural complementary medicine; natural health medicine; natural holistic medicine; discount nutritional supplement; nutritional vitamin supplement; nutritional dietary supplement; total quality management in health care; total health choice; natural medicine; preventative health care; proactive health care; physical therapists in health care; nutritionists in health care; how do I know what supplement is best for me; too many supplements on market
10 Sep 2008
248
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6:16
*******www.instablogs****/ France shocked by the images of war published by Paris Match The French magazine, Paris Match, has acted irresponsibly by publishing pictures of Taliban along with guns, walkie-talkies and even a wrist-watch – belonging to 10 French soldiers they killed in an ambush last month. The pictures were allotted the front page on the glossy spread, completely unmindful of the psychological pain and suffering which the families of the deceased servicemen and their serving comrades in Afghanistan would have to undergo when they see the pictures. Although the freedom of press is fiercely protected in France, the act has outraged the public which implies that the magazine should apologize for its careless act and refrain from such actions in future. French media has every right to rekindle the argument regarding the role played by French troops in Afghanistan given the fact that nearly two third of the population is against their positioning along with US led coalition forces in Afghanistan and want them back in the country. It should remember that the same can be achieved through constructive means and not by ruthlessly trampling over the sentiments of the bereaved families. Mexican court upholds law favoring free, legal abortion Mexico Court's decision to uphold a law that allows legal and free abortion in Mexico City during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy is widely acclaimed by the feminists, and why not. This ruling is of great importance and set a precedent for state legislatures to pass measures legalizing abortion. It is likely to encourage similar legislative drives outside Mexico City where abortion remains illegal except in certain cases, such as pregnancies resulting from rape or incest. It is even good as the abortions have long been available in Mexico and many poor women seeking to terminate pregnancies have obtained drugs from pharmacists without a doctor's signature. But this move would make abortions more widely available to women of all social classes while reducing the risk of death or injury from procedures performed in underground clinics. Moreover, it's historic with a wide impact on women's rights not only in Mexico but throughout Latin America. Baby peddling thrives in South Korea The South Korean fertility industry is one of the largest industries which operates with virtually no rules or governmental oversight. 'Ae Ran Won' are birthing rooms that supply the raw material (babies) for export to the United States. Korea is the largest supplier of babies to the U.S. and accounts for 62 percent of all babies adopted from abroad. While the surrogates make anywhere from $ 10000 to $75000, this luxury of creating babies also creates a plethora of dilemmas. For instance should doctors be allowed to implant multiple embryos? If triplets or even quintuplets are produced, should the adoptive parents be allowed to keep the most desirable of the litter and discard the remainder? Such choices present very hard questions about the worthiness of life. The complexities of baby trade are mind boggling and need to be approached with extreme caution and regulated closely, if not by the individual states, then by the federal government. Child labor and trafficking rampant in Malawi Child labor and trafficking in Malawi is nothing new. Children as young as 10 years old are trafficked from many parts of the country and are kept in critical conditions. These children are used in agricultural work, whereas girls are put in domestic work and in some cases, prostitution. Due to these conditions these children do not have the opportunity to access formal education. There are currently no proper records of children trafficked for child labor due to poor technical and financial capacity. The other weaknesses include lack of clear policy on child labor or child trafficking and therefore, those promoting this modern-day slavery have not been punished enough. There are some community programs aimed at curbing this problem, but they are so far insufficient. There is a crucial need for a law on child trafficking and child labor and an urgent need on educating the poor, the first victims of this menace, failing which, Malawi is doing nothing but breeding an HIV disaster.
1 Feb 2012
1371
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5:09
This is a documentary comparing established western medical cancer treatments with other less conventional “alternative” ones. The program reveals how the conglomerates such as the FDA, the AMA, and mega pharmacy corporations lobby and control virtually all aspects of the public’s perception regarding the efficacy of medical treatment today. Today’s conventional and “accepted” practices are invasive and highly toxic and have shown a mere 5% success rate in curing cancer; whereas other more holistic approaches have shown 70 - 80% success in curing cancer. The main focus of this show is how many patients and doctors cured themselves using alternative methods- if you know anyone diagnosed with cancer you should not miss this movie (given that half the population will get some form of cancer in their lifetime).
11 Sep 2008
266
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2:42
*******hubpages****/hub/Travel-to-India-Tourist-Information The Republic of India is seventh largest country in the world and second most populated country after China. India is also known as Bharat and Hindustan. Hindi is the official language of India.ndia is a place of different religion, language and culture. India can be divided into four zones – East, West, North and South. Different people, different cultures, different festivals and different languages exist in all the four zones. One thing in common is Unity. There is unity in diversity. All respect the National Antham “Jana Gana Mana” and Father of the Nation “Mahatma Gandhi”. All celebrate together the Festival of Colours – Holi and Festival of Light – Deepavali or Diwali. Muslims take part in Hindu’s Festival of Holi and Diwali and Hindus take part in Muslim’s Festivals like Id. This is the Magic of India.
11 Sep 2008
5124
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9:17
Video Produced by Blank Stage Productions *******www.blankstageproductions**** Since January of 2006, Special Olympics Forsyth (SO Forsyth) has increased its participation in state games by adding certified coaches in the areas of basketball skills and teams, powerlifting, tennis, table tennis, bowling, bocce, softball skills, track and field, and aquatics. This has allowed us to greatly increase the number of athletes that we send to state and area games as well as increase their participation in after school sports activities. Even more exciting, we have increased the number of SO Forsyth adult athletes. This is very important to us as we strive to encourage life long health habits and provide opportunities to gain new friendships among our adult population with developmental disabilities. Without adapted sports and Special Olympics Programs, our young and adult athletes have very limited access to typical sporting events and social activities. We will continue to ensure Special Olympics Forsyth is a recognized sporting program with numerous sporting activities offered throughout the year for all athletes with developmental disabilities. Special Olympics is well known for its ability to promote self-awareness and bring joy among its athletes who participate. Even more, Special Olympics provides opportunities for individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities to participate in leisure activities which are often taken for granted by the average person. Research has shown that the more students participate in Special Olympics, the more likely they are to participate in leisure activities beyond high school. Parents of adults with disabilities often share the frustration and heartache of watching their adult child disengage from the community as their opportunities to participate in community activities and sporting events decline. By increasing the number of activities and sporting events provided to individuals with developmental disabilities, we are encouraging community participation and a sense of belonging and self-worth.
17 Apr 2009
1016
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0:27
look at future of america, Iraq and gay rights. John McCain will be dead by 2013, So if we don't vote for Barrak Obama, we will be voting a crazy gun toting redneck who is from a worthless state with a population smaller than that of brooklyn. By voting for John McCain you will elect Sarah Palin. do you really want a border line retarded hockey mom to be in control of the future of the free world? VOTE OMBAMA OR DIE, Sarah Palin in John McCain will make america into jesus land. I rushed to make this video to get the message out, *******www.retoddedmovies****
13 Sep 2008
1620
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1:36
*******www.MORVacationsAmerica**** MOR Vacations and Team Cutting Edge team leader Dean Marino recognizes a little known California resort area in the Eastern Sierra Nevada. A key for members of MOR Vacations is to offer resorts close to major population bases. This resort is accessible by car to over 20 million Southern California residents. About 300 miles from Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego, the hiking, fishing, and skiing resorts that await the urbanites are a world away. Marino says MOR Vacations offers more inventory and better deals right here in the U S A because they’re based right here, not overseas. Other vacation clubs had a great idea but fell short when Americans could not find the deals close by, where they could get to them easily Dean is a founding member of {MOR Vacations} and knows travel makes people happy. Marino coordinated marketing training for the largest and most successful group in a major home based travel business from 2005 until earlier this year. His students learned and succeeded in internet marketing as well as personal branding as well as various off line marketing methods. Marino says his years of experience taught him that there is a perfect marketing plan for everyone out there. He explained that some marketers like to talk with lots of prospects on the phone and others hate it. Several have had success with face to face marketing, while for others marketing is a one on one relationship with the computer. Marino is recognized as a true home based travel business expert and he likes the superior travel membership offered by MOR Vacations. Travel club memberships with {MOR Vacations} provide one week condo and pool home vacations that start at just $149. That alone could be responsible for the success of MOR Vacations, but there's more. MOR Vacations offers over 5400 resort locations and members can select from hundreds of thousands of weeks that are available. While many realize the right marketing plan is their key to success, Marino makes sure they start out knowing they have a great product to market. The superior product of MOR Vacations is only part of the success story. Marino says financing the MOR Vacations memberships at zero percent financing is another key to member success. MOR Vacations members with Dean Marino are provided with a free marketing system that includes an auto responder. In addition to the great MOR Vacations travel product and free marketing system, Marino sees another reason for the success his MOR Vacations team members are having. His Cutting Edge Team members with MOR Vacations are getting more support than they have ever seen marketing anything in the home based business arena and that equals success. Marino's MOR Vacations members plug their prospects into multimedia web presentations hosted by Marino as well as several conference calls each week. Multiple web platforms are also used for his MOR Vacations group training. His MOR Vacations group members can access recorded training day and night and Marino is available for consultations and one-on-one market plan training and help 7 days a week
16 Sep 2008
422
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3:35
Introduction The Uyghurs are the native people of East Turkestan, also known as Sinkiang or Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The latest Chinese census gives the present population of the Uyghurs estimate according to Chinese official statement 8,345,622 million. But the Uyghurs estimate themselves more than 20 millions. There are also 500,000 Uyghurs in West Turkestan mostly known as Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan . Almost 75,000 Uyghurs have their homes in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Europe and the United States. The Chinese sources indicate that the Uyghurs are the direct descendants of the Huns. Ancient Greek, Iranian, and Chinese sources placed Uyghurs with their tribes, and sub-tribes in the vast area between the west banks of the Yellow River in the east, Eastern Turkestan in the west, and in the Mongolian steppe in the northeast as early as 300 B.C.. Early History Uyghur Empire After the fall of the Kokturk Empire in Central Asia, the Uyghurs established their true state Uyghur empire in 744, with the city of Karabalgasun, on the banks of the Orkhun River, as its capital. After the death of Baga Tarkan in 789 and specially after that of his successor, Kulug Bilge Khagan in 790, Uyghur power and prestige declined. The Ganzhou Uyghur Kingdom The Kanchou (Ganzhou) Uyghur Kingdom, which was established in today's Gansu province of China, in 850. Several thousand of these Uyghurs still live in the Kansu (Gansu) area under the name yellow Uyghurs or Yugurs, preserving their old Uyghur mother tongue and their ancient Yellow sect of Lamaist Buddhism. The Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the northern part of Khan Tengri (Tianshan Mountains) in East Turkestan established the Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom (Qocho) near the present day city of Turfan (Turpan), in 846. The Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the southern part of Khan Tengri, established the Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom in 840 with the support of other Turkic clans like the Karluks, Turgish and the Basmils, with Kashgar as its capital. In 934, during the rule of Satuk Bughra Khan, the Karakhanids embraced Islam 19 . Thus, in the territory of East Turkestan two Uyghur kingdoms were set up: the Karakhanid, who were Muslims, and the Karakhojas, who were Buddhists.In 1397 this Islamic and Buddhist Uyghur Kingdoms merged into one state and maintained their independence until 1759. Manchu Invasion The Manchus who set up a huge empire in China, invaded the Uyghur Kingdom of East Turkestan in 1759 and dominated it until 1862. In 1863, the Uyghurs were successful in expelling the Manchus from their motherland, and founded an independent kingdom in 1864. The money for the Manchu invasion was granted by the British Banks. After this invasion, East Turkestan was given the name Xinjiang which means "new territory" or "New Dominion" and it was annexed into the territory of the Manchu empire on November 18,1884. Chinese communist rule In 1911, the Nationalist Chinese, overthrew Manchu rule and established a republic. Twice, in 1933 and 1944, the Uyghurs were successful in setting up an independent East Turkestan Republic. But these independent republics were overthrown by the military intervention and political intrigues of the Soviet Union. It was in fact the Soviet Union that proved deterrent to the Uyghur independence movement during this period. In 1949 Nationalist Chinese were defeated by the Chinese Communists. After that, Uyghurs fell under Chinese Communist rule. Uyghur Civilization At the end of the 19th and the first few decades of the 20th century, scientific and archaeological expeditions to the region along the Silk Road in East Turkestan led to the discovery of numerous Uyghur cave temples, monastery ruins, wall paintings, statues, frescoes, valuable manuscripts, documents and books. Members of the expedition from Great Britain, Sweden, Russia, Germany, France, Japan, and the United States were amazed by the treasure they found there, and soon detailed reports captured the attention on an interested public around the world. The relics of these rich Uyghur cultural remnants brought back by Sven Hedin of Sweden, Aurel Stein of Great Britain, Gruen Wedel and Albert von Lecoq from Germany, Paul Pelliot of France, Langdon Warner of the United States, and Count Ottani from Japan can be seen in the Museums of Berlin, London, Paris, Tokyo, Leningrad and even in the Museum of Central Asian Antiquities in New Delhi. The manuscripts, documents and the books discovered in Eastern Turkestan proved that the Uyghurs had a very high degree of civilization. This Uyghur power, prestige and civilization which dominated Central Asia for more than a thousand years went into a steep decline after the Manchu invasion of East Turkestan, and during the rule of the Nationalist and specially during the rule of the Communist Chinese.
14 Sep 2008
2770
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4:09
Introduction The Uyghurs are the native people of East Turkestan, also known as Sinkiang or Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The latest Chinese census gives the present population of the Uyghurs estimate according to Chinese official statement 8,345,622 million. But the Uyghurs estimate themselves more than 20 millions. There are also 500,000 Uyghurs in West Turkestan mostly known as Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan . Almost 75,000 Uyghurs have their homes in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Europe and the United States. The Chinese sources indicate that the Uyghurs are the direct descendants of the Huns. Ancient Greek, Iranian, and Chinese sources placed Uyghurs with their tribes, and sub-tribes in the vast area between the west banks of the Yellow River in the east, Eastern Turkestan in the west, and in the Mongolian steppe in the northeast as early as 300 B.C.. Early History Uyghur Empire After the fall of the Kokturk Empire in Central Asia, the Uyghurs established their true state Uyghur empire in 744, with the city of Karabalgasun, on the banks of the Orkhun River, as its capital. After the death of Baga Tarkan in 789 and specially after that of his successor, Kulug Bilge Khagan in 790, Uyghur power and prestige declined. The Ganzhou Uyghur Kingdom The Kanchou (Ganzhou) Uyghur Kingdom, which was established in today's Gansu province of China, in 850. Several thousand of these Uyghurs still live in the Kansu (Gansu) area under the name yellow Uyghurs or Yugurs, preserving their old Uyghur mother tongue and their ancient Yellow sect of Lamaist Buddhism. The Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the northern part of Khan Tengri (Tianshan Mountains) in East Turkestan established the Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom (Qocho) near the present day city of Turfan (Turpan), in 846. The Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the southern part of Khan Tengri, established the Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom in 840 with the support of other Turkic clans like the Karluks, Turgish and the Basmils, with Kashgar as its capital. In 934, during the rule of Satuk Bughra Khan, the Karakhanids embraced Islam 19 . Thus, in the territory of East Turkestan two Uyghur kingdoms were set up: the Karakhanid, who were Muslims, and the Karakhojas, who were Buddhists.In 1397 this Islamic and Buddhist Uyghur Kingdoms merged into one state and maintained their independence until 1759. Manchu Invasion The Manchus who set up a huge empire in China, invaded the Uyghur Kingdom of East Turkestan in 1759 and dominated it until 1862. In 1863, the Uyghurs were successful in expelling the Manchus from their motherland, and founded an independent kingdom in 1864. The money for the Manchu invasion was granted by the British Banks. After this invasion, East Turkestan was given the name Xinjiang which means "new territory" or "New Dominion" and it was annexed into the territory of the Manchu empire on November 18,1884. Chinese communist rule In 1911, the Nationalist Chinese, overthrew Manchu rule and established a republic. Twice, in 1933 and 1944, the Uyghurs were successful in setting up an independent East Turkestan Republic. But these independent republics were overthrown by the military intervention and political intrigues of the Soviet Union. It was in fact the Soviet Union that proved deterrent to the Uyghur independence movement during this period. In 1949 Nationalist Chinese were defeated by the Chinese Communists. After that, Uyghurs fell under Chinese Communist rule. Uyghur Civilization At the end of the 19th and the first few decades of the 20th century, scientific and archaeological expeditions to the region along the Silk Road in East Turkestan led to the discovery of numerous Uyghur cave temples, monastery ruins, wall paintings, statues, frescoes, valuable manuscripts, documents and books. Members of the expedition from Great Britain, Sweden, Russia, Germany, France, Japan, and the United States were amazed by the treasure they found there, and soon detailed reports captured the attention on an interested public around the world. The relics of these rich Uyghur cultural remnants brought back by Sven Hedin of Sweden, Aurel Stein of Great Britain, Gruen Wedel and Albert von Lecoq from Germany, Paul Pelliot of France, Langdon Warner of the United States, and Count Ottani from Japan can be seen in the Museums of Berlin, London, Paris, Tokyo, Leningrad and even in the Museum of Central Asian Antiquities in New Delhi. The manuscripts, documents and the books discovered in Eastern Turkestan proved that the Uyghurs had a very high degree of civilization. This Uyghur power, prestige and civilization which dominated Central Asia for more than a thousand years went into a steep decline after the Manchu invasion of East Turkestan, and during the rule of the Nationalist and specially during the rule of the Communist Chinese.
1 Jan 2010
3362
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3:45
Introduction The Uyghurs are the native people of East Turkestan, also known as Sinkiang or Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The latest Chinese census gives the present population of the Uyghurs estimate according to Chinese official statement 8,345,622 million. But the Uyghurs estimate themselves more than 20 millions. There are also 500,000 Uyghurs in West Turkestan mostly known as Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan . Almost 75,000 Uyghurs have their homes in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Europe and the United States. The Chinese sources indicate that the Uyghurs are the direct descendants of the Huns. Ancient Greek, Iranian, and Chinese sources placed Uyghurs with their tribes, and sub-tribes in the vast area between the west banks of the Yellow River in the east, Eastern Turkestan in the west, and in the Mongolian steppe in the northeast as early as 300 B.C.. Early History Uyghur Empire After the fall of the Kokturk Empire in Central Asia, the Uyghurs established their true state Uyghur empire in 744, with the city of Karabalgasun, on the banks of the Orkhun River, as its capital. After the death of Baga Tarkan in 789 and specially after that of his successor, Kulug Bilge Khagan in 790, Uyghur power and prestige declined. The Ganzhou Uyghur Kingdom The Kanchou (Ganzhou) Uyghur Kingdom, which was established in today's Gansu province of China, in 850. Several thousand of these Uyghurs still live in the Kansu (Gansu) area under the name yellow Uyghurs or Yugurs, preserving their old Uyghur mother tongue and their ancient Yellow sect of Lamaist Buddhism. The Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the northern part of Khan Tengri (Tianshan Mountains) in East Turkestan established the Karakhoja Uyghur Kingdom (Qocho) near the present day city of Turfan (Turpan), in 846. The Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom The Uyghurs living in the southern part of Khan Tengri, established the Karakhanid Uyghur Kingdom in 840 with the support of other Turkic clans like the Karluks, Turgish and the Basmils, with Kashgar as its capital. In 934, during the rule of Satuk Bughra Khan, the Karakhanids embraced Islam 19 . Thus, in the territory of East Turkestan two Uyghur kingdoms were set up: the Karakhanid, who were Muslims, and the Karakhojas, who were Buddhists.In 1397 this Islamic and Buddhist Uyghur Kingdoms merged into one state and maintained their independence until 1759. Manchu Invasion The Manchus who set up a huge empire in China, invaded the Uyghur Kingdom of East Turkestan in 1759 and dominated it until 1862. In 1863, the Uyghurs were successful in expelling the Manchus from their motherland, and founded an independent kingdom in 1864. The money for the Manchu invasion was granted by the British Banks. After this invasion, East Turkestan was given the name Xinjiang which means "new territory" or "New Dominion" and it was annexed into the territory of the Manchu empire on November 18,1884. Chinese communist rule In 1911, the Nationalist Chinese, overthrew Manchu rule and established a republic. Twice, in 1933 and 1944, the Uyghurs were successful in setting up an independent East Turkestan Republic. But these independent republics were overthrown by the military intervention and political intrigues of the Soviet Union. It was in fact the Soviet Union that proved deterrent to the Uyghur independence movement during this period. In 1949 Nationalist Chinese were defeated by the Chinese Communists. After that, Uyghurs fell under Chinese Communist rule. Uyghur Civilization At the end of the 19th and the first few decades of the 20th century, scientific and archaeological expeditions to the region along the Silk Road in East Turkestan led to the discovery of numerous Uyghur cave temples, monastery ruins, wall paintings, statues, frescoes, valuable manuscripts, documents and books. Members of the expedition from Great Britain, Sweden, Russia, Germany, France, Japan, and the United States were amazed by the treasure they found there, and soon detailed reports captured the attention on an interested public around the world. The relics of these rich Uyghur cultural remnants brought back by Sven Hedin of Sweden, Aurel Stein of Great Britain, Gruen Wedel and Albert von Lecoq from Germany, Paul Pelliot of France, Langdon Warner of the United States, and Count Ottani from Japan can be seen in the Museums of Berlin, London, Paris, Tokyo, Leningrad and even in the Museum of Central Asian Antiquities in New Delhi. The manuscripts, documents and the books discovered in Eastern Turkestan proved that the Uyghurs had a very high degree of civilization. This Uyghur power, prestige and civilization which dominated Central Asia for more than a thousand years went into a steep decline after the Manchu invasion of East Turkestan, and during the rule of the Nationalist and specially during the rule of the Communist Chinese.
14 Sep 2008
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