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2:38
Lasik-surgery is a medical procedure used in order to correct various refractory problems including nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Lasik-surgery procedures normally takes a minute for each eye. The process includes re-shaping the contours of the cornea, which is the protruding portion of the surface of the eye.
19 Aug 2010
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1:59
Lasik-surgery is a medical procedure used in order to correct various refractory problems including nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Lasik-surgery procedures normally takes a minute for each eye. The process includes re-shaping the contours of the cornea, which is the protruding portion of the surface of the eye.
16 Sep 2010
121
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2:00
www.carolhollanmd**** After pregnancy and/or massive weight loss, many women are often left with sagging breasts and a protruding abdomen due to stretched muscles. Because of this, they may not feel like them selves and seek out professional assistance in regaining their pre-pregnancy body. At Dr. Carol Hollan’s practice, patients may undergo a combination of procedures called a “Mommy Makeover.” The most commonly performed surgeries include breast augmentation, breast lift surgery, tummy tuck surgery, and liposuction. Based on each patient’s individual anatomy and desired goals, a personalized surgical plan is created in order to achieve an optimal outcome. Dr. Hollan takes great pride in helping patients reach their breast and body contouring needs. It is her goal to provide patients with satisfying and natural-looking results. You may browse her website to learn more regarding the Mommy Makeover surgery. At this time, you may also schedule an appointment to discuss your options.
16 Oct 2010
653
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5:43
*******www.etrailer****/tv-install-magnaflow-exhaust-2005-infinti-g35-coupe.aspx Videos are provided as a guide only. Refer to manufacturer installation instructions and specs for complete information. Today we are going to be installing Magnaflow Performance Exhaust system part number 16641on a 2005 Infiniti G35 Coupe. Before we get started we want to go ahead and disconnect the negative terminal off the battery. The battery is located behind this panel here on the upper left-hand side of the engine compartment. This going to allow the computer to reset so when we get the new exhaust system on it will reconfigure itself to the new exhaust. And we will go underneath the vehicle and start disconnecting the old exhaust. This is a Cat Black system so we will be moving the exhaust tips all the way up to the disconnect point behind the catalytic converter. So we need to unbolt the flange here from these two bolts and we are also going to need to remove the exhaust off all its hangers as well. The rubber hangers we are going to be using are located right here, right here, right here, and right here. Using a spray lubricant on the rubber hangers will make the removal of those a lot easier. You are going to want to save the rubber hangers because we will be reusing those for the re-installation. And then also here just forward of the main exhaust you want to disconnect the ground wire off of the post here. We can go ahead and start disassembling it. I defiantly recommend spraying down all the bolts first with a lubricant like a WD40 because these will likely be rusted. This will help ease the removal of the nuts. Next we are going to go to the flange just rear of the exhaust and go ahead and remove the ground strap. Okay now we will remove the exhaust from all of the hangers. With all the rubber hangers removed you can go ahead and take the exhaust system out. The first piece we are going to go ahead and put in place is the one nearest the catalytic converter. Just going to be bolted to the flange, you want to make sure you have the gasket in place here. We do want to make sure the slight bend here goes toward the driver side. We want to leave everything fairly loose for the time being until we get it all installed and then we can tighten it all down. Okay next we are going to put the second inlet piece in. You want the side with the rubber hanger to be facing the drivers side, it is going to attach right here. Then we are going to take one of the clamps that are provided with the installation kit and slide it over the inlet tube here over the end with the notches cut out of it. Go ahead and take that, and slide it over, slide it all the way in. All right go ahead and attach it to the rubber hanger here. Then we slide the clamp over and again we are just going to loosely install it for the time being. What I am going to do is manipulate it in and out of the inlet tube until that rubber hanger is facing straight up and down. Before I put the muffler on I am actually going to pre-install the clamp over this inlet tube because once the muffler is in place it is going to be tough to manipulate around there. Then we are going to go ahead and install the muffler itself. In preparation I went ahead and in the area where the muffler goes I went ahead and put all of the the rubber hangers back on the vehicle itself. Now that I have the muffler adjusted and properly into place I can go ahead and install our other clamp. I am going to go ahead and install with the threads on the upper side on each of them. And with that loosely installed I can go ahead and start tightening everything down. When tightening down you want to start with the forward most bolts and work your way rearward. Last thing you want to do is go ahead and re-secure our grounding strap. To do that we are just going to be using the protruding threads from our clamp here at the rear most attaching point. Just slide that over and re-install it with the lock nut that is provided with the installation kit. With the grounding strap on again you just want to make sure all of our hangers are secure and our installation will be complete. This exhaust system was designed to make the car sound louder. Here is how it sounded before. And here is how it sounds now. And that will conclude the installation of part number 16641 on a 2005 Infiniti G35 Coupe.
30 Oct 2010
1376
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2:11
*******www.etrailer****/tv-hitch-install-1987-dodge-ram.aspx Videos are provided as a guide only. Refer to manufacturer installation instructions and specs for complete information. Today on this 1987 Dodge Ram Pickup we will be installing Curt hitch part number 14001. We are underneath the vehicle looking at the passenger side frame rail. We are going to go ahead and point out the mounting locations for the trailer hitch. The hitch is going to attach directly to the bottom of the frame here at this edge. Depending on your model year there may be existing holes here at the bottom of the frame that will align with the trailer hitch. We are going to be using the 1/ 2 hole that is a little bit more forward here on the frame. We are actually going to go ahead and align that to the middle attaching hole on the trailer hitch and then we will just go ahead and drill out the four other holes. So the first thing we want to do is go ahead and take one of the carriage bolts and blocks. Merge the two together and it from the top side here of the frame to where the threads will protruding down. 00:47 You want to do the same thing on the driver side of the vehicle and then we will go ahead and put the hitch up into position, attach it to those carriage bolts with the flanged hex nut provided with the installation kit. You will note the two larger holes that are going to be going around rivets on different models so we are not going to be using those. We will be drilling out this hole here and this hole here as well. I am going to start out by drilling with 1/ 8 inch drill bit and then we will enlarge the hole to 1/ 2 inch. With the holes drilled we want to go ahead and the carriage bolt and blocks into each of the four other positions. We want to go ahead and torque our bolts down. You want to check with your directions to verify the appropriate torque rating for each individual bolt. With the bolts torqued down our installation is complete. This will conclude the installation of Curt hitch part number 14001 on a 1987 Dodge Ram Pickup.
2 Nov 2010
780
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9:26
*******www.lamfacialplastics**** Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon, Dr. Sam Lam, provides a new systematic approach to undestanding his strategy to create natural, balanced otoplasty results for protruding ears. key words: otoplasty, cosmetic plastic surgery, reduce ears, big ears, protruding ears, lop ear, cup ear, correction, dr. sam lam, dallas, plano, texas
18 Nov 2010
407
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1:13
Take a tour of Brixen Cathedral in Italy – part of the World’s Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. Italy's Piazza del Duomo in the city of Brixen, hosts one of the oldest buildings in the country. Protruding high into the skyline, the towers of Brixen Cathedral compete with their mountainous surroundings. Inside the cathedral, visitors are able to take in the centuries-old paintings and three spectacular naves. Dramatic lines and defined edges represent the cathedral's powerful stance through numerous renovations. An exciting exterior feature of this Romanesque edifice is the insignia atop the entrance honoring the pope. Representative of architecture from the 10th century through the 18th century, the building proclaims its century old story. A landmark as ancient as the city it calls home, Brixen Cathedral epitomizes the adaptable culture of Italy.
8 Dec 2010
205
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0:59
Take a tour of Vranov Castle in Czech Republic – part of the World’s Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. A site equivalent to nature’s magic protrudes out of the hilltop. Stunning, sheer cliff faces support the enchanting Vranov Castle in the town of the same name. The intricate Baroque architecture is both commanding and awe-inspiring. Flourishes from the 17th through the 19th century adorn every angle of this magnificent building. The sumptuous furnishings and locally manufactured pottery lavished upon the interior of this beloved castle attest to its importance. An ever-present shepherd, Vranov Castle towers over the Dyje River below.
21 Dec 2010
265
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0:54
Take a tour of Palazzo Madama in Turin, Italy – part of the World’s Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. The Palazzo Madama is a palace in Turin, Italy with an interesting history, spanning millenniums. Two of the towers, the oldest components of the palace, predate Christianity. In the fourteenth century, a square castle was constructed in the location. The four turrets of the castle protrude out the sides of the existing structure. The newest part, the front of the palace, was reconstructed in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Palazzo Madama is currently the location of the Museum of Ancient Art.
28 Dec 2010
192
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1:40
*******www.refreshcartridges****** Facebook - *******on.fb.me/hreVQQ Twitter - *******bit.ly/gtJNlw Today we are going to be looking at the TP-Link USB Cradle (UC100). This device is designed to simply extend the range of a single USB port on your computer upto 1.5mtr. The design of this product is typical of TP-Links stuff and is very elegant and minimalist , as is the installation. No drivers or technical knowledge is required at all, simply plug it in any USB port and your ready to go straight away. The product itself should be compatible with any system that uses USB as it is effectively a USB extension cable. The key difference being the female end stands upright and has a couple of extra features. All of the USB devices I tried fit nicely and I can't think of any that wouldn't and the female end protrudes nicely from the base meaning it shouldn't conflict with anything near by or the base itself. It is however a different story for the cap holder as this fits completely flush with the base and if the cap of your USB device is recessed at all it means it will not reach the cap holder . This would have been ever so easy to solve if the cap holder had been made a little longer to compensate for such caps. I think this is a shame as this would have been a useful feature. The bottom of the USB cable has a felt like surface which means it can slide around on your desk. This is handy if you are frequently changing devices, but means you have to hold the cradle down to the desk whenever you need to remove something. I know suction cups are not for everyone, but it would have been nice if an optional removable one was included. In conclusion this is a nice functional device that moves an existing USB port literally to your finger tips. Whilst it doesn't have any extra features like additional USB ports and it does have a couple of minor design flaws, if you have need of such a accessory it is certainly recommendable.
8 Jan 2011
656
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1:09
Visit *******www.indonesiaindonesia****/en/f/48272-film-hollywood-x-men-origins-wolverine/ *******en.wikipedia****/wiki/X-Men_Origins:_Wolverine For In 1845 Canada, young James Howlett sees his father killed by groundskeeper Thomas Logan. The trauma activates the boy's mutation: bone claws protrude from James' hands, and he kills his father's murderer. With his dying breath, Thomas Logan reveals that he, not John Howlett, is James' real father. James flees with Victor Creed, the abused son of their father who is thus James' brother. They spend the next century as soldiers, fighting in the American Civil War, both World Wars and the Vietnam War. In Vietnam, Victor attempts to rape a local village woman, but is stopped after killing a senior officer. Despite his objections to Victor's actions, James defends his brother, and the two are sentenced to execution by firing squad, which they survive. Major William Stryker approaches them, now in military custody, and offers them membership in Team X, a group of mutants including marksman Agent Zero, swordsman Wade Wilson, teleporter John Wraith, invincible Fred Dukes and electropathic Chris Bradley. They join the team, but the group's questionable actions and disregard for human life cause James to leave. Hope you like it...
9 Feb 2011
1029
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1:09
Take a tour of Spanish Town of Besalu in Besalu, Spain – part of the World’s Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. In the north eastern region of Catalonia, Spain is the well-preserved medieval town of Besalu. This locale contains many exquisite monuments, such as its 12 century Romanesque bridge, which features a stunning arch protruding out its midpoint. The classic stone architecture and stunning sculptures found throughout the town only add to its stark beauty. The medieval cobble-stone squares, narrow stone pathways, and overarching residences provide this site a protected and quiet atmosphere. This largely monochromatic town offers sweeping panoramas of the surrounding verdant landscape. Besalu is set on the banks of the Fluvia River, whose current, after passing through this medieval treasure, spills out into the Mediterranean Sea.
17 Mar 2011
535
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14:07
gestalt dreamwork done by me, franklyn wepner, on my own life, including my own interpretation of the session in terms of jewish philosophy ("kabbalah"). along with this video is an essay, also by me, commenting on Rashi's notes for the genesis portion of the torah. the parallels between my gestalt therapy session and the essay are striking, when we probe the roots of both processes from the point of view of aristotle and maimonides. if you don't want to deal with all this stuff, push "delete" now! PARASHAT B'REISHIT FRANKLYN WEPNER OCTOBER 2009 franklynwepnergmail**** THE ARISTOTELIAN DIALECTIC We see clearly in Rashi's commentaries on this Torah portion his Aristotelian and dialectical orientation. Rashi cleverly finds ways to insert the Aristotle dialectic as a logical skeleton on which the glad tidings of the Torah Creation story drape in the manner of a garment on the body of a person. Essentially, dialectical logic moves from a "thesis" to an "antithesis" to a "synthesis", and that is exactly what Rashi demonstrates as the logical throughline which is at work here in the tale of how God creates His world in seven days. The creation dialectic in Parshat B'reishit moves, according to Rashi, from the One (God alone, the thesis) to the Many (the world with all its differentiated components, the antithesis) and finally to the One in the Many or the Many in the One (God in the world or the world in God, the synthesis). THE THESIS: THE ONENESS OF GOD Whatever it was that actually did transpire on that first day of Creation, Rashi boils it all down, logically speaking, to a manifestation of the Oneness of God. The relevant Torah passage is: "Elohim called the light day, and the darkness He called night. It became evening and it became morning, one day." Rashi's commentary on this passage is: "Why then is it written [here] 'one'? This is because [on this day] God was alone in His world, for the angels were not created until the second day. This is the explanation in Bereshit Rabbah." For Rashi, then, God being "alone in His world" is the thesis, the initial state of affairs of the dialectical logic underlying the entire Torah portion. Rashi then goes on to anticipate a possible objection of someone who might argue that the Torah next states "Elohim said "Let there be a canopy in the midst of the waters, and let it divide between waters and waters." Rashi's commentary is: [The meaning is] let the expanse be solidified. Even through the heavens were created on the first day, they were nevertheless, still fluid and were solidified on the second day by the roaring command of God, when He said, "Let there be a canopy!" Rashi's point here seems to allude to the Neoplatonic position of Philo that the heavens on the first day were there in the manner of ideas in the mind of God, and not yet created as separate components of a world. Hence, despite the presence of the heavens on the first day, God was still One. The angels, which according to Maimonides are the separate forces which result in differentiation within the world, have not yet made their appearance. B'REISHIT 1:5-6. THE THESIS EXTENDED TO INCLUDE MORE IDEAS IN THE MIND OF GOD The Torah next introduces a transitional stage lasting from day two until day six, until the moment when God created Eve from the rib of Adam. During this transitional time, on the one hand God was no longer One, since the creatures, including man, have somehow already appeared. But on the other hand, the Fall from an initial state of oneness with God in the Garden of Eden has not yet occurred. Again, Rashi seems to be relying on the Platonic point of view of pure ideas still residing in the mind of God. The mechanics of how God manages to pull this off involve a special meaning for the word "naming". Here is how that naming process works. The creatures have a tendency to attain a state of separateness and move onto the antithesis, but man - still created as an image of God - serves the will of God by "naming" all the creatures. The point is that this naming also implies subjugating and dominating. By naming the creatures for God, man simultaneously subjugates them to the grid of differentiations implicit in a pure language that allows God still to be comfortable with Himself as Lord of the World. The creatures, once named by Adam, are restored to the state of ideas in the mind of God, since no deviation from the will of God has yet occurred. Here are proof texts to substantiate this interpretation. First we have the peculiar notion that naming something somehow conquers and subjugates it. The Torah says, "Adonoy Elohim formed from the ground every beast of the field, and every bird of the heaven, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them. Whatever the man called [each] living creature, that is its name." Rashi adds, "immediately on the day they were created He brought them to man to call them by name. According to the Aggadah, the word 'yetsirah' has the meaning of dominating and subjugating them, under the domination of man." That is to say, Rashi's interpretation is that man - even before he was created as a separate creature on day six, was busy performing God's naming function. This could only be the case if both man and the the entities he is naming still are merely ideas in the mind of God, in a state of oneness with God. Concerning vegetation, for example, Rashi says, "[the fact that] on the third day it is written 'Let the earth sprout forth' [should be interpreted] they did not protrude but they remained at the surface of the ground until the sixth day [when man was created]." That is to say, man (in his fully separated state) is needed as part of the divine plan, for the other creatures to achieve their fully separated state. Then, once man and the creatures all have become fully differentiated, we have arrived at the second stage of the dialectic, the stage of the antithesis. Now God is no longer One, alone with himself and His ideas. Rather, now the focus shifts to the limits that separate the different creatures. B'REISHIT 2:19. Underlying this view of the creation process, we have the fundamental Aristotelian principle that "actuality is prior to potentiality". Rashi says, "everything was actually created from the first day, and required only to be brought forth". B'REISHIT 1:24. That is to say, at the moment of "b'reshit" ("in the beginning") God did his founding act of action and creation, which (logically speaking) is that moment of total reality and actuality when the knower, the known and the knowing all are one. The moment might be, for example, that at which a hero decides to risk his life to save other people, or it might be the moment at which a man decides to get married, or divorced. This first moment in an action includes all the different parts of the whole that will eventually emerge and move from potentiality to actuality, as the final stage of the action is achieved. Rashi is very clear about this. Rashi says: "He relates the end from the beginning, without stating it explicitly. He relates from the beginning of something the end of something." B'REISHIT 1:1. The basic teleological principle of Aristotle cannot be any more clearly articulated than that. Aristotle's position also is an organismic point of view. A living creature is viewed here as a totality consistent of cells and organs, each of which also is a totality. An action, likewise, is a whole consisting of parts, each of which is also a whole which seeks to actualize its potentiality by participating fully in the ongoing action of the entire organism. Rashi ties this organismic idea to the notion that any committed, authentic action by man is, in a sense, a naming and subjugating of all of God's creatures that are involved in that action to the encompassing idea of that action. Through being fully alive in his concrete existential situation, man serves as God's proxy and enables God to maintain His organismic totality as a One with many parts. Philosophically speaking, this is the model Leibniz presents in his theory of a monadology made up of monads, a totality made up of subordinate totalities, each of which could by a figure ground reversal emerge as the new encompassing totality. In order to consistently maintain this complex view of creation Rashi is driven to invoke some rather extreme bits of Jewish folklore. The Torah states, "And thus Elohim created man in His form. In the form of Elohim He created him, male and female He created them." Rashi's commentaries are, "this teaches you that the form that was established for him [i.e., man], is the form of the image of his Creator", and "[Yet] later it states 'He took one of his ribs, etc'. According to the Midrash Agadah He created him with two faces at first and afterward He divided him". Again we see that the Platonic notion of ideas still impacted in the mind of God provides a way out of these theological conundrums. Man as image of God, still an idea in the mind of God, has no problem having two faces, in the sense that for him chochmah and binah, the right and left pillars of the tree of life, still are in a state of oneness within keter, the original sefirah. It is only when Eve appears on the scene as an opposition to Adam, an "ezer k'negdo" ("helper against him") - in the sense of non-ego versus ego, or nature versus man - that a real contact boundary of separateness emerges between two aspects of man's reality, and between creatures in general, as will now be elucidated. At that moment the two faces of man separate into that of Adam and Eve. B'REISHIT 1:27. THE REAL ANTITHESIS The Torah says, "Adonoy Elohim built the rib that He took from the man into a woman and He brought her to the man. The man said, 'This at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh. This shall be called Woman, for from Man was she taken'. Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and cling to his wife, and they shall become one flesh." Rashi comments, "this teaches that Adam attempted to find [his mate] among all the animals and beasts, and he was not satisfied with them, until he discovered Eve." In order for the dialectic to unfold, there needs to emerge a stage of true antithesis, which we can represent as X/-X, where "X" and "-X" are two states in a relationship of opposition. The initial state of oneness we can represent as "X". For a relationship to exist there needs to emerge a contact boundary through which the opposing states can relate to each other. By continuing his naming function and naming Eve "eeshah" (woman) as an opposite to "eesh" (man) Adam establishes a true contact boundary, an otherness that now negates the original oneness of God, and builds up the left side of the sefirotic tree of life under the rubric of "binah" (Hebrew: "building"), as an opposition to the right side of the tree under the rubric of "chochmah". Extending the literal story of Adam and Eve to the realm of metaphor allows us to look at the awareness process of Gestalt Therapy as a similar process of contact boundary formation, in keeping with the tradition of Aristotelian psychology. In awareness work our mind (oneness, chochmah, Adam) radiates a ray of awareness, while the object contacted likewise may be said to radiate a ray of awareness (otherness, binah, Eve). The two rays, the original one and the projected and returning one, meet somewhere between subject and object, and establish a moment of living experience as a dialectical synthesis of the two opposites. This is the kabbalistic moment of "da'at", which links chochmah and binah on the sefirotic tree. Nachman of Breslav uses the metaphor of two pure birds encountering each other. We now can decode the two statements of Adam: (1) that Eve is "bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh", and (2) that "a man shall leave his father and mother and cling to his wife, and they shall become one flesh". If the mother and father in question are the chochmah/binah relationship on the level of pure ideas, sefirot in the mind of God, and, furthermore, if the relationship of Adam to Eve is on the level of living, concrete, contactful experience in this world of human encounters, then we have followed the dialectical movement from thesis to antithesis, from pure ideas as oneness in the mind of God to living, concrete experience in a world alienated from and resistant to the oneness of God. THE FINAL SYNTHESIS IN GOD'S CRUCIBLE Fragmentation, at the moment of the antithesis, need not be the end of the dialectic, however. For the prediction by Adam that "they shall become one flesh" is actualized to the extent that the awareness and contact process is successful, and leads to authentic action as the final synthesis. The honeymoon of pure contact on the level of pure ideas in the mind of God does not last long. Soon arrives the serpent with his tempting offer, that "your eyes will be opened and you will become as gods, knowing what is good and what is evil". B'REISHIT 3:5. The moment of the Fall into sin is, as Maimonides maintains in his "Guide", the shift from completed actions to actions interrupted by an excessive focus on distinctions of good versus evil, which is the work of the left pillar of the tree of life. Self-interruption of authentic action is a reliance upon rigid distinctions rather than a submission to the active passivity of the middle way which is represented by the middle pillar of the Tree of Life. The Torah describes the plight of Adam at this moment. "Adonoy Elohim said, 'behold, the man has become like one of us to know [what is] good and [what is] evil. Now he must be prevented from reaching out his hand and also taking from the Tree of Life and eating [from it] and live forever . . . He stationed the Cherubim and the flame of the rotating sword to guard the way to the Tree of Life." B'REISHIT 3:22-24. In terms of the dialectic, we have arrived at the moment of extreme opposites, arising from too many judgments, rigid distinctions and unaware habits, all of which interfere with the flow of awareness and contact. Non-contactful blocs separating the fragments of a person's personality and shattering the Oneness of God are alluded to in the metaphor of Cherubim blocking the return to the Garden, while the "flame of the rotating sword" suggests the cycles of the dialectical logic (theses/antithesis/synthesis) which a spiritual pilgrim or therapy client needs to work through in order to arrive "home" again. The hard work of overcoming and encompassing opposites in higher syntheses is what kabbalists of various sects label the moment of "tsimtsum", in which the searcher shifts his focus from deductively struggling with endless logical distinctions to inductively focusing on integrating his fragmented self. "Induction" is the philosophical term for the therapy process of gestalt formation and integration, through work on awareness. What in Gestalt Therapy is labeled "the rhythm of contact and withdrawal", is the endless spiral of alternating moments of deduction (all the things encountered in the contact boundary via awareness) and induction (withdrawal into the no-thingness of the void), leading to finding new ideas internally in the fertile void at the moment of "tsimtsum" during each cycle. The path is a difficult one to traverse, but with the tools of Gestalt Therapy (awareness and the rhythm of contact and withdrawal) a man does oftentimes succeed in "reaching out his hand and taking from the Tree of Life and eating from it and living forever", that is to say in the messianic now of authentic action. Thus, if Rashi's commentary on Genesis is the theory component, then Gestalt Therapy is a paradigm case of practical laboratory work which embodies Rashi's Aristotelian point of view. God is the alchemist, and the world we live in is His crucible.
23 Mar 2011
1754
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1:36
GAME OVER MAN! Enter the infested alien world of protruding bitey mouths and acid blood in Aliens: Colonial Marines.
2 Jun 2011
961
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5:39
The doctor explains as he is doing the infant circumcision. The Plastibell Circumcision Device is a clear plastic ring with handle designed for male neonatal circumcision that has a deep groove running circumferentially. The adhesions between glans and foreskin are divided with a probe. Then the foreskin is cut longitudinally to allow it to be retracted and the glans (the head of penis) to be exposed. The Plastibell comes in 6 sizes. The appropriate one is chosen and applied to the head. The ring is then covered over by the foreskin. A ligature is tied firmly around the foreskin, crushing the skin against the groove in the Plastibell. Then the excess skin protruding beyond the ring is trimmed off. Finally, the handle is broken off at the end of the procedure. The entire procedure takes five to ten minutes, depending on the experience and skill of the surgeon. The ring falls off in 3 to 7 days leaving a circumferential wound that will heal over the following week. Typically, the glans will appear red or yellow until it has cornified. At least 50% of American non-therapeutic infant circumcisions since 1980 have been performed with a Plastibell.
30 Jul 2011
6946
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12:43
גשטאלט-בראשית gestalt dreamwork "genesis", hebrew added. gestalt dreamwork done by me, franklyn wepner, on my own life, including my own interpretation of the session in terms of jewish philosophy ("kabbalah"). along with this video is an essay, also by me, commenting on Rashi's notes for the genesis portion of the torah. the parallels between my gestalt therapy session and the essay are striking, when we probe the roots of both processes from the point of view of aristotle and maimonides. if you don't want to deal with all this stuff, push "delete" now! PARASHAT B'REISHIT FRANKLYN WEPNER OCTOBER 2009 franklynwepnergmail**** THE ARISTOTELIAN DIALECTIC We see clearly in Rashi's commentaries on this Torah portion his Aristotelian and dialectical orientation. Rashi cleverly finds ways to insert the Aristotle dialectic as a logical skeleton on which the glad tidings of the Torah Creation story drape in the manner of a garment on the body of a person. Essentially, dialectical logic moves from a "thesis" to an "antithesis" to a "synthesis", and that is exactly what Rashi demonstrates as the logical throughline which is at work here in the tale of how God creates His world in seven days. The creation dialectic in Parshat B'reishit moves, according to Rashi, from the One (God alone, the thesis) to the Many (the world with all its differentiated components, the antithesis) and finally to the One in the Many or the Many in the One (God in the world or the world in God, the synthesis). THE THESIS: THE ONENESS OF GOD Whatever it was that actually did transpire on that first day of Creation, Rashi boils it all down, logically speaking, to a manifestation of the Oneness of God. The relevant Torah passage is: "Elohim called the light day, and the darkness He called night. It became evening and it became morning, one day." Rashi's commentary on this passage is: "Why then is it written [here] 'one'? This is because [on this day] God was alone in His world, for the angels were not created until the second day. This is the explanation in Bereshit Rabbah." For Rashi, then, God being "alone in His world" is the thesis, the initial state of affairs of the dialectical logic underlying the entire Torah portion. Rashi then goes on to anticipate a possible objection of someone who might argue that the Torah next states "Elohim said "Let there be a canopy in the midst of the waters, and let it divide between waters and waters." Rashi's commentary is: [The meaning is] let the expanse be solidified. Even through the heavens were created on the first day, they were nevertheless, still fluid and were solidified on the second day by the roaring command of God, when He said, "Let there be a canopy!" Rashi's point here seems to allude to the Neoplatonic position of Philo that the heavens on the first day were there in the manner of ideas in the mind of God, and not yet created as separate components of a world. Hence, despite the presence of the heavens on the first day, God was still One. The angels, which according to Maimonides are the separate forces which result in differentiation within the world, have not yet made their appearance. B'REISHIT 1:5-6. THE THESIS EXTENDED TO INCLUDE MORE IDEAS IN THE MIND OF GOD The Torah next introduces a transitional stage lasting from day two until day six, until the moment when God created Eve from the rib of Adam. During this transitional time, on the one hand God was no longer One, since the creatures, including man, have somehow already appeared. But on the other hand, the Fall from an initial state of oneness with God in the Garden of Eden has not yet occurred. Again, Rashi seems to be relying on the Platonic point of view of pure ideas still residing in the mind of God. The mechanics of how God manages to pull this off involve a special meaning for the word "naming". Here is how that naming process works. The creatures have a tendency to attain a state of separateness and move onto the antithesis, but man - still created as an image of God - serves the will of God by "naming" all the creatures. The point is that this naming also implies subjugating and dominating. By naming the creatures for God, man simultaneously subjugates them to the grid of differentiations implicit in a pure language that allows God still to be comfortable with Himself as Lord of the World. The creatures, once named by Adam, are restored to the state of ideas in the mind of God, since no deviation from the will of God has yet occurred. Here are proof texts to substantiate this interpretation. First we have the peculiar notion that naming something somehow conquers and subjugates it. The Torah says, "Adonoy Elohim formed from the ground every beast of the field, and every bird of the heaven, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them. Whatever the man called [each] living creature, that is its name." Rashi adds, "immediately on the day they were created He brought them to man to call them by name. According to the Aggadah, the word 'yetsirah' has the meaning of dominating and subjugating them, under the domination of man." That is to say, Rashi's interpretation is that man - even before he was created as a separate creature on day six, was busy performing God's naming function. This could only be the case if both man and the the entities he is naming still are merely ideas in the mind of God, in a state of oneness with God. Concerning vegetation, for example, Rashi says, "[the fact that] on the third day it is written 'Let the earth sprout forth' [should be interpreted] they did not protrude but they remained at the surface of the ground until the sixth day [when man was created]." That is to say, man (in his fully separated state) is needed as part of the divine plan, for the other creatures to achieve their fully separated state. Then, once man and the creatures all have become fully differentiated, we have arrived at the second stage of the dialectic, the stage of the antithesis. Now God is no longer One, alone with himself and His ideas. Rather, now the focus shifts to the limits that separate the different creatures. B'REISHIT 2:19. Underlying this view of the creation process, we have the fundamental Aristotelian principle that "actuality is prior to potentiality". Rashi says, "everything was actually created from the first day, and required only to be brought forth". B'REISHIT 1:24. That is to say, at the moment of "b'reshit" ("in the beginning") God did his founding act of action and creation, which (logically speaking) is that moment of total reality and actuality when the knower, the known and the knowing all are one. The moment might be, for example, that at which a hero decides to risk his life to save other people, or it might be the moment at which a man decides to get married, or divorced. This first moment in an action includes all the different parts of the whole that will eventually emerge and move from potentiality to actuality, as the final stage of the action is achieved. Rashi is very clear about this. Rashi says: "He relates the end from the beginning, without stating it explicitly. He relates from the beginning of something the end of something." B'REISHIT 1:1. The basic teleological principle of Aristotle cannot be any more clearly articulated than that. Aristotle's position also is an organismic point of view. A living creature is viewed here as a totality consistent of cells and organs, each of which also is a totality. An action, likewise, is a whole consisting of parts, each of which is also a whole which seeks to actualize its potentiality by participating fully in the ongoing action of the entire organism. Rashi ties this organismic idea to the notion that any committed, authentic action by man is, in a sense, a naming and subjugating of all of God's creatures that are involved in that action to the encompassing idea of that action. Through being fully alive in his concrete existential situation, man serves as God's proxy and enables God to maintain His organismic totality as a One with many parts. Philosophically speaking, this is the model Leibniz presents in his theory of a monadology made up of monads, a totality made up of subordinate totalities, each of which could by a figure ground reversal emerge as the new encompassing totality. In order to consistently maintain this complex view of creation Rashi is driven to invoke some rather extreme bits of Jewish folklore. The Torah states, "And thus Elohim created man in His form. In the form of Elohim He created him, male and female He created them." Rashi's commentaries are, "this teaches you that the form that was established for him [i.e., man], is the form of the image of his Creator", and "[Yet] later it states 'He took one of his ribs, etc'. According to the Midrash Agadah He created him with two faces at first and afterward He divided him". Again we see that the Platonic notion of ideas still impacted in the mind of God provides a way out of these theological conundrums. Man as image of God, still an idea in the mind of God, has no problem having two faces, in the sense that for him chochmah and binah, the right and left pillars of the tree of life, still are in a state of oneness within keter, the original sefirah. It is only when Eve appears on the scene as an opposition to Adam, an "ezer k'negdo" ("helper against him") - in the sense of non-ego versus ego, or nature versus man - that a real contact boundary of separateness emerges between two aspects of man's reality, and between creatures in general, as will now be elucidated. At that moment the two faces of man separate into that of Adam and Eve. B'REISHIT 1:27. THE REAL ANTITHESIS The Torah says, "Adonoy Elohim built the rib that He took from the man into a woman and He brought her to the man. The man said, 'This at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh. This shall be called Woman, for from Man was she taken'. Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and cling to his wife, and they shall become one flesh." Rashi comments, "this teaches that Adam attempted to find [his mate] among all the animals and beasts, and he was not satisfied with them, until he discovered Eve." In order for the dialectic to unfold, there needs to emerge a stage of true antithesis, which we can represent as X/-X, where "X" and "-X" are two states in a relationship of opposition. The initial state of oneness we can represent as "X". For a relationship to exist there needs to emerge a contact boundary through which the opposing states can relate to each other. By continuing his naming function and naming Eve "eeshah" (woman) as an opposite to "eesh" (man) Adam establishes a true contact boundary, an otherness that now negates the original oneness of God, and builds up the left side of the sefirotic tree of life under the rubric of "binah" (Hebrew: "building"), as an opposition to the right side of the tree under the rubric of "chochmah". Extending the literal story of Adam and Eve to the realm of metaphor allows us to look at the awareness process of Gestalt Therapy as a similar process of contact boundary formation, in keeping with the tradition of Aristotelian psychology. In awareness work our mind (oneness, chochmah, Adam) radiates a ray of awareness, while the object contacted likewise may be said to radiate a ray of awareness (otherness, binah, Eve). The two rays, the original one and the projected and returning one, meet somewhere between subject and object, and establish a moment of living experience as a dialectical synthesis of the two opposites. This is the kabbalistic moment of "da'at", which links chochmah and binah on the sefirotic tree. Nachman of Breslav uses the metaphor of two pure birds encountering each other. We now can decode the two statements of Adam: (1) that Eve is "bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh", and (2) that "a man shall leave his father and mother and cling to his wife, and they shall become one flesh". If the mother and father in question are the chochmah/binah relationship on the level of pure ideas, sefirot in the mind of God, and, furthermore, if the relationship of Adam to Eve is on the level of living, concrete, contactful experience in this world of human encounters, then we have followed the dialectical movement from thesis to antithesis, from pure ideas as oneness in the mind of God to living, concrete experience in a world alienated from and resistant to the oneness of God. THE FINAL SYNTHESIS IN GOD'S CRUCIBLE Fragmentation, at the moment of the antithesis, need not be the end of the dialectic, however. For the prediction by Adam that "they shall become one flesh" is actualized to the extent that the awareness and contact process is successful, and leads to authentic action as the final synthesis. The honeymoon of pure contact on the level of pure ideas in the mind of God does not last long. Soon arrives the serpent with his tempting offer, that "your eyes will be opened and you will become as gods, knowing what is good and what is evil". B'REISHIT 3:5. The moment of the Fall into sin is, as Maimonides maintains in his "Guide", the shift from completed actions to actions interrupted by an excessive focus on distinctions of good versus evil, which is the work of the left pillar of the tree of life. Self-interruption of authentic action is a reliance upon rigid distinctions rather than a submission to the active passivity of the middle way which is represented by the middle pillar of the Tree of Life. The Torah describes the plight of Adam at this moment. "Adonoy Elohim said, 'behold, the man has become like one of us to know [what is] good and [what is] evil. Now he must be prevented from reaching out his hand and also taking from the Tree of Life and eating [from it] and live forever . . . He stationed the Cherubim and the flame of the rotating sword to guard the way to the Tree of Life." B'REISHIT 3:22-24. In terms of the dialectic, we have arrived at the moment of extreme opposites, arising from too many judgments, rigid distinctions and unaware habits, all of which interfere with the flow of awareness and contact. Non-contactful blocs separating the fragments of a person's personality and shattering the Oneness of God are alluded to in the metaphor of Cherubim blocking the return to the Garden, while the "flame of the rotating sword" suggests the cycles of the dialectical logic (theses/antithesis/synthesis) which a spiritual pilgrim or therapy client needs to work through in order to arrive "home" again. The hard work of overcoming and encompassing opposites in higher syntheses is what kabbalists of various sects label the moment of "tsimtsum", in which the searcher shifts his focus from deductively struggling with endless logical distinctions to inductively focusing on integrating his fragmented self. "Induction" is the philosophical term for the therapy process of gestalt formation and integration, through work on awareness. What in Gestalt Therapy is labeled "the rhythm of contact and withdrawal", is the endless spiral of alternating moments of deduction (all the things encountered in the contact boundary via awareness) and induction (withdrawal into the no-thingness of the void), leading to finding new ideas internally in the fertile void at the moment of "tsimtsum" during each cycle. The path is a difficult one to traverse, but with the tools of Gestalt Therapy (awareness and the rhythm of contact and withdrawal) a man does oftentimes succeed in "reaching out his hand and taking from the Tree of Life and eating from it and living forever", that is to say in the messianic now of authentic action. Thus, if Rashi's commentary on Genesis is the theory component, then Gestalt Therapy is a paradigm case of practical laboratory work which embodies Rashi's Aristotelian point of view. God is the alchemist, and the world we live in is His crucible.
9 Aug 2011
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