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BY YIQIAN ZHANG ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy. “While Americans are watching the situation in Japan, many on the West Coast are trying to protect themselves in case of radiation fallout. People there are rushing to buy potassium iodide. It’s an over-the-counter drug that protects the thyroid from radiation.” (KRCG) In some places such as Los Angeles, the pills are sold out. But does potassium iodide even protect against radiation? A writer for medical blog WebMD says, not really. “It’s important to note that potassium iodide pills protect only the thyroid. They don’t prevent your body from taking in the radiation and don’t help prevent radiation damage to other parts of the body.” (WebMD) And a health expert tells Fox News- the risks associated with the medicine may not be worth it. “It can cause thyroid disease, it can cause allergies, it can cause stomach upset, know as you are vomiting it can cause diarrhea…” (Fox News) Regardless of whether the pills work- a health expert tells KSBW- the U.S. west coast isn’t exactly inside the radiation zone. “The evacuation zone they are moving people to is 12 miles from the nuclear plant. That’s what they are saying is a safe area. We are from five to seven thousand miles from there. Do the math.” (KSBW) But an editor for Bay Citizen argues- with all the ambiguous reports about the radiation levels, it makes sense- people are scared. “Experts we spoke to seem convinced that no matter what happens at Fukushima Daiichi, a radiation cloud blowing across the Pacific won't pose any health hazards in California. But since we don't really know exactly what level of radiation exposure might cause long-term health problems, I'm not sure I believe this.” (Bay Citizen) That editor went on to say definitive answers about radiation levels are in quote “maddeningly short supply.” Still - a BlogHer writer says that’s no reason to panic. “You can either run around like a headless chicken, hightailing it to the closest pharmacy so you can buy hundreds of bottles of potassium iodide, while you constantly wonder when the world will cave in, or you can do your best to be informed -- then take a deep breath -- and let it go.” (BlogHer) According to Google Insights, searches for “potassium iodide” and similar terms have increased more than 5,000 percent over the past week- but only in the U.S. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
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15:44
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 There are different types of radiation. Radiation can be useful, but it can also be dangerous, and some types are more dangerous than others. Some kinds of radiation exposure can increase the probability of genetic damage and of developing diseases such as cancer and tumors. Radiation sickness is a kind of illness that happens when body tissues are exposed to radioactive substances. It can occur when there is accidental exposure to high doses of radiation, such as nuclear power plant accidents or when radiation is used for medical treatments. Some well-known examples of incidents that have caused radiation sickness include the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, when a massive explosion caused intense radiation to spread over a wide area. Radiation can also come from everyday activities, such as exposure to the sun. The effects of radioactive poisoning can last for months and years.
15 Apr 2017
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15:44
Sea Vegetables – According to a 1964 McGill University study published in the “Canadian Medical Association Journal,” sodium alginate from kelp reduced radioactive strontium absorption in the intestines by 50 to 80 percent. The sodium alginate allowed calcium to be absorbed through the intestinal wall while binding most of the strontium, which was excreted out of the body. Some of the more popular sea vegetables to consume are kelp, arame, wakame and kombu. Canadian researchers reported that sea vegetables contained a polysaccharide substance that selectively bound radioactive strontium and helped eliminate it from the body. In laboratory experiments, sodium alginate prepared from kelp, kombu, and other brown seaweeds off the Atlantic and Pacific coasts was introduced along with strontium and calcium into rats. The reduction of radioactive particles in bone uptake, measured in the femur, reached as high as 80 percent, with little interference with calcium absorption. “The evaluation of biological activity of different marine algae is important because of their practical significance in preventing absorption of radioactive products of atomic fission as well as in their use as possible natural decontaminators.” Source: Y. Tanaka et al., “Studies on Inhibition of Intestinal Absorption of Radio-Active Strontium,” Canadian Medical Association Journal 99:169-75, 1968. The Atomic Energy Commission recommends for maximum protection against radioactive poisoning for humans, taking a minimum of 2 to 3 ounces of sea vegetables a week or 10 grams (two tablespoons) a day of sodium alginate supplements. During or after exposure to radiation, the dosage should be increased to two full tablespoons of alginate four times daily to insure that there is a continual supply in the GI or gastrointestinal tract. There may be a rare concern of constipation but this can be avoided if the sodium alginate is made into a fruit gelatin. Agar, derived from sodium alginate in kelp, is a safe,
29 Nov 2017
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15:44
Sea Vegetables – According to a 1964 McGill University study published in the “Canadian Medical Association Journal,” sodium alginate from kelp reduced radioactive strontium absorption in the intestines by 50 to 80 percent. The sodium alginate allowed calcium to be absorbed through the intestinal wall while binding most of the strontium, which was excreted out of the body. Some of the more popular sea vegetables to consume are kelp, arame, wakame and kombu. Canadian researchers reported that sea vegetables contained a polysaccharide substance that selectively bound radioactive strontium and helped eliminate it from the body. In laboratory experiments, sodium alginate prepared from kelp, kombu, and other brown seaweeds off the Atlantic and Pacific coasts was introduced along with strontium and calcium into rats. The reduction of radioactive particles in bone uptake, measured in the femur, reached as high as 80 percent, with little interference with calcium absorption. “The evaluation of biological activity of different marine algae is important because of their practical significance in preventing absorption of radioactive products of atomic fission as well as in their use as possible natural decontaminators.” Source: Y. Tanaka et al., “Studies on Inhibition of Intestinal Absorption of Radio-Active Strontium,” Canadian Medical Association Journal 99:169-75, 1968. The Atomic Energy Commission recommends for maximum protection against radioactive poisoning for humans, taking a minimum of 2 to 3 ounces of sea vegetables a week or 10 grams (two tablespoons) a day of sodium alginate supplements. During or after exposure to radiation, the dosage should be increased to two full tablespoons of alginate four times daily to insure that there is a continual supply in the GI or gastrointestinal tract. There may be a rare concern of constipation but this can be avoided if the sodium alginate is made into a fruit gelatin.
4 Dec 2017
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