Results for: saywhat-hearing Search Results
Family Filter:
People connect to each other by talking, by telling stories, and by sharing their thoughts and feelings. We communicate to get things done and hearing is our most social sense. When you cannot hear well, you miss the conversations and sounds of the world happening around you. We want to create a world where everyone has the chance to enjoy life without ever missing a word. We provide the innovations, education, and assistance that will help you hear your life to the fullest. We are passionate about restoring hearing with the best technology.
0:51
More often than not, hearing loss doesn’t just happen immediately. It is a combination of age, prolonged exposure to noise, lifestyle habits and other factors. The negative stigma of “not wanting to look old” or a lack of information leads most people who could benefit from hearing aids to wait 5-7 years before they see an audiologist. That’s a long time! Oftentimes, the best way to know if you have a hearing loss is to ask a loved one you spend frequent time with. Hearing loss is gradual and takes time before getting bad enough to notice. When getting fitted for new hearing aids, the familiar voice of someone you know serves as a basis for comparison. That’s why audiologists recommend that you bring a friend or loved one with you to the appointment when having your hearing tested. Remember to visit our website to learn more! "saywhathearing" dot com Transcript: “Hi, I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘If I had a hearing loss, I would know about it’ – fact or fiction? This is fiction. Most individuals with hearing loss don’t go to bed one-night hearing, and then wake up in the morning and say, “I have a hearing loss.” In fact, it’s something that for the most part is gradual, and takes place over 10 to 20 years. Typically, the first sign that you’re having an issue is going to be when you get into a noisy environment, and you start noticing yourself struggling or asking people to repeat themselves."
10 Jan 2018
230
Share Video

0:42
It’s not uncommon to think that age-related hearing loss is something that affects us later in life. However, 65% of the world population who is hard of hearing is actually under the age of 65. Hearing loss statistics provided by the World Health Organization find that 33% of individuals with hearing loss are over the age of 65. 1 in 5 adult Americans have some degree of hearing loss - whether it be mild, moderate or severe. You may be also surprised to find that the largest group of individuals living with an untreated form of hearing loss is actually between the ages of 40-59. The symptoms can and usually do run in families. Hearing loss can also go hand in hand with tinnitus - a condition where you hear whistling, ringing, or buzzing in your ears. People with tinnitus are also more prone to have hearing loss, regardless of their age. Wondering whether or not your hearing loss may be age-related? Click here to learn more about age-related hearing loss. Through our videos, articles, and featured hearing aid products, we are dedicated to hearing loss advocacy and awareness. Visit a hearing professional in your area for a hearing evaluation to determine whether or not you have a hearing loss and discuss hearing aid options. Transcript: “Hi, I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘65% of people with hearing loss are under the age of 65.’ – fact or fiction? This is a fact. Hearing loss is not reserved just for the older population. It can affect anybody from babies all the way up, and most people start noticing their hearing declining at around the age of 40.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
98
Share Video

0:42
If you're wondering, 'Is my hearing loss normal' - you're not alone, but it all depends on how you look at it. It's extremely normal in the sense that around 20% of the U.S. experiences it. It's normal in the way that no one should feel odd or lacking because of it. Percentage-wise, a mild hearing loss (as opposed to moderate or severe hearing loss) is the most common - as stated in this Audiology Online report. Just as your hearing loss is normal, so too are the hearing aid solutions available to you. Denial of hearing loss is common, especially when it can feel like you are only hard of hearing in certain situations, such as loud restaurants, busy places of gathering, or when speaking at a cocktail party. In addition, a variety of factors can determine how well you can communicate in a given environment. Some environments reverberate, making it harder for someone to locate the fixed point at which a sound came from. Other environments are loud or have background noise. Also, people are different. The same loud environment can be bothersome to one person yet tolerable to another. Transcript: “Hi, I’m Doctor Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat! Today’s topic is: “A little hearing loss is normal; I should wait until it gets really bad before I do something about it.” Fact or Fiction? Fiction. While its true that most Americans wait about 7 years when they first notice a difficult time hearing to doing something about it, as a hearing care professional, we recommend getting in as soon as possible, as your outcome with hearing aids is dependent on how quickly you seek help!” In this series, SayWhatHearing interviewed an audiologist to get her take on popular topics related to hearing loss. Dr. Heather Parrish has been practicing audiology since 2006. She enjoys educating new hearing aid users, or family and friends who have a loved one with hearing loss. Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
198
Share Video

0:34
Audiologists and hearing aid specialists often hear the question, "Do all hearing aids sound the same?" Dr. Heather Parrish tackles this question with a flourish. In fact, “All hearing aids do not sound the same.” Hearing aid sound quality is best when an audiologist has gotten a chance to review your individual hearing loss needs. There is a tremendous amount of variety when it comes to hearing aids, but the microchip technology inside is what can make a world of difference between lower quality amplification products and actual, premium hearing aids. Modern hearing aids have a number of features to increase sound clarity in specific environments. Here are a few questions to consider that can help new hearing aid users better understand their preferences: - Do you have mild, moderate, or severe hearing loss? - If you're not sure, find out with our Online Hearing Test or request a visit with a professional. - Do you prefer more power, discreetness, mobility - or all three? - Compare the styles and types of hearing aids to make the right choice for yourself or for a loved one. - Do you go running, jogging, or engage in outdoor activities that would bring moisture into the hearing aid? Transcript: "Hi, I’m Doctor Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat! Today’s topic is: “All hearing aids sound the same; Fact or Fiction? This is Fiction.” All hearing aids do not sound the same. In fact, saying that they do is like saying all cars drive the same. So, while all hearing aids do work to help you hear better, the way in which they do that, and the sound quality will differ." In this series, SayWhatHearing interviewed an audiologist to get her take on popular topics related to hearing loss. Dr. Heather Parrish has been practicing audiology since 2006. She enjoys educating new hearing aid users, or family and friends who have a loved one with hearing loss. Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
164
Share Video

0:38
You may have heard the expression, "Get the rocks out of your ears." Well, in reality, that may not be such a smart idea. These "rocks" inside our inner ears are called otoconia and extremely important to our sense of balance. After a head injury or trauma, some individuals will naturally feel a loss of balance, similar to vertigo. In this video, audiologist Dr. Heather Parrish explains how these tiny rocks in your ear can become dislodged and cause problems. Your inner ear has about 1,000 tiny rocks made out of calcium carbonate which stimulate our nerve cells when we move our heads. They are named otoconia and they help determine our sense of direction and balance. Like little grains of sand, these inner ear “rock slides” can lead to vertigo or tinnitus as they are closely linked to the otolith organs. The otolith senses gravity and linear acceleration. A damaged otolith results in poorer abilities to sense motion and a harder time orienting their bodies in physical space. To learn more about otoliths and otoconia, read this study from the National Institute of Health. Transcript: "Hi, I’m Doctor Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat! Today’s topic is: “Your inner ear has tiny rocks in it; Fact or Fiction? This is a Fact.” Those tiny rocks have a name “Otoconia.” For the most part they reside in your ear and you never notice them, until they become dislodged, in which case a person is going to complain of extreme dizziness or Vertigo, and we would recommend that you visit your Doctor." In this series, SayWhatHearing interviewed an audiologist to get her take on popular topics related to hearing loss. Dr. Heather Parrish has been practicing audiology since 2006. She enjoys educating new hearing aid users, or family and friends who have a loved one with hearing loss. Visit us at "saywhathearing dot com
10 Jan 2018
278
Share Video

0:41
Over 50 million Americans (15% of the general population) have some form of tinnitus. However, the prevalence of tinnitus rises to 70-85 % in individuals who have a hearing loss. Although the conditions are drastically different, one could argue that they are comorbid. That is, hearing loss and tinnitus tend to occur together. There is no medical cure for tinnitus. Thought-leaders in the field of tinnitus like Glenn Schweitzer talk about how individuals can manage their tinnitus spikes and learn to habituate to the disease - however it requires management of stress, exercise, and the implementation of a healthy diet. Since high levels of stress and anxiety can actually make tinnitus worse, learning to live with the condition is usually the default option. Schweitzer coaches individuals how to manage their tinnitus through meditation. You should know that there are hearing aids that have been shown to reduce patients’ symptoms. Many hearing aids from danish manufacture Widex come with a built-in tinnitus relief feature called ZEN. It will play soothing fractal tones that has a relaxing effect counteracting the ringing in their ears. Transcript: “Hi, I’m Doctor Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat! Today’s topic is: “Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in your ears can be one of the symptoms of hearing loss. Fact or Fiction? Fact.” Tinnitus, or that ringing in your ears is often one of the earliest symptoms of hearing loss. The good news is that hearing aids often times will help alleviate the tinnitus. While they don’t make it go away completely, when you’re able to hear other sounds it makes the ringing less noticeable.” In this series, SayWhatHearing interviewed an audiologist to get her take on popular topics related to hearing loss. Dr. Heather Parrish has been practicing audiology since 2006. She enjoys educating new hearing aid users, or family and friends who have a loved one with hearing loss. Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
212
Share Video

0:43
Cotton swabs are meant to remove wax from the ear canal run the risk of doing more harm than good. Research from otolaryngologists reveals that cotton swab calamities are a major cause of ear-related ER visits among U.S. adults. Because of the cotton swab design, you tend to push in more earwax in than you pull out. Since some individuals produce more earwax than others, it can be tempting to want to remove it yourself. But here are reasons why you shouldn’t: 1. Earwax is composed of dead tissue which is effective at trapping and killing microorganisms. 2. Your body already has a system for removing ear wax naturally. 3. You risk pushing ear wax and dead skin cells even further into your ear canal. Wonder how the ear canals self-cleanse? Well, your ears are built to move out ear wax, or cerumen, naturally out of the ear canal - like a conveyor belt. A natural process removes extra earwax out of the tunnel. At that point, once on the outside ear, it gets dry, and flakes off. When you swallow or chew; the moving motion caused by your jaw and moving head actually self-cleanse the ear canal. How cool is that?! Transcript: “Hi, I’m Doctor Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat! Today’s topic is: “Your ears naturally clean themselves. Fact or Fiction? This is a Fact.” Your ears are designed to naturally expel any foreign substance including your own earwax. This is why I recommend washing only the outside of the ear with a wash cloth. We never recommend using a cotton swab, because that only serves to push the wax further in and can cause your ear to become impacted, which can result in hearing loss.” In this series, SayWhatHearing interviewed an audiologist to get her take on popular topics related to hearing loss. Dr. Heather Parrish has been practicing audiology since 2006. She enjoys educating new hearing aid users, or family and friends who have a loved one with hearing loss. Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
420
Share Video

0:43
If you have ever looked into hearing aid options for yourself or a loved one, then you’ve probably wondered why hearing aids are so expensive. It’s a very natural question and a common concern among many individuals who could use the extra hearing power but live on a tighter budget. The top 6 hearing aid manufacturers in the world don’t produce the cost-effective hearing aids, and the fact that most health insurance providers don’t offer coverage doesn’t help too much Hearing aids have a higher cost associated with them for 3 reasons: 1. Research and Development. The microchip technology and advanced research that goes into finding out new methods of usability testing and sound amplification is what makes up research and development. 2. The Audiologist’s time is valuable. Studies find that audiologists spend almost 4 hours with each new hearing aid user. The customization, fitting, and follow up process between a new patient and an audiologist requires individualized attention at the hands of a certified professional. 3. Hearing aids, and hearing aid services are bundled together. This means that the initial cost incurred is stretched to include all of the additional visits required with the hearing professional such as the fitting, casting of the mold if it's an in-the-ear device, and follow-up evaluations bundled together. Transcript: “Hi I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘Hearing aids are too expensive’ - fact or fiction? Well, this is a little bit of a tricky one. I like to say Fiction. While it is true that hearing aids aren’t cheap, you can consider them an investment in your quality of life and maintaining relationships of those around you. When you come in and have a conversation with your hearing care professional, part of what they will do is to help to find a solution for you that fits both your lifestyle and your budget.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
253
Share Video

0:34
It's very much a common occurrence that after new hearing aids users have adjusted to life with the volume turned up, that they report an extra boost in their energy levels throughout the day. One of the biggest reasons behind this is because the process of listening has become easier and requires less mental strain to try and make out what's being said. This, in turn, helps bolster a socially active personality without the nerves of going to a potentially noisy or crowded area. Hearing fatigue, and a loss of energy due to listening are more common if you have hearing loss. Actively listening, especially in an environment where there can be multiple sounds conflicting with the speech of the person you’re trying to hear. There is a genuine amount of effort that goes into the act of listening when the hair cells in your ears have been worn down or damaged. We know that the message of what we communicate is based in large part on tone of voice. So not only must a person follow along with the “what” of the story, but also the “why” - i.e. how that speaker feels about things. Get informed on hearing aid options and get back into the conversation The stigma surrounding hearing loss often immobilizes patients who would significantly benefit from it. Browse our website to find informative content on hearing aids and start enjoying sounds sooner. If you’re ready to go in for a hearing evaluation, get started by requesting a visit here or just give us a call at 1-866-978-7321. Transcript: “Hi I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘Many new hearing aid users report having extra energy’ - fact or fiction? This is a fact. It is true that many new users, once they start wearing hearing aids, feel like they’ve got lots of extra energy. This is thought to occur because they don’t have to spend so much energy focusing on hearing.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
232
Share Video

0:27
The Hearing Loss Association of America states that 1 in 5 Americans (20% of the U.S. population) report some degree of hearing loss. At age 65 33% of people have a hearing loss. This gives evidence to support the claim that hearing loss increases with age. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) used a sample size of 53,111 and had similar findings. The NHIS also postulated that access to hearing healthcare can reduce the overall health burden hard of hearing people have. That’s what makes regular screening important. You should you get your hearing checked as often as you get your eyes checked: once a year. Catching hearing loss early on is also recommended. About 2-3 of every 1000 children in the U.S. are born with a detectable hearing loss in one or both ears. If you feel your child has a hearing loss, we highly suggest reading this article titled Identifying Hearing Loss in Children. Hearing Loss Relations to Other Conditions Hearing loss and a number of other conditions have been found to be linked to one another. For instance, research finds that if you have a hearing loss, your chances of having diabetes doubles. Transcript: “Hi I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the United States’ - fact or fiction? Fact. Hearing loss affects 48 million Americans and is more prevalent than cancer and diabetes.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
1109
Share Video

0:38
If you’re a musician, concert-goer, or construction worker, then chances are you’re no stranger to loud sounds. Electric guitars, bumping bass, and jarring jackhammers can all cause irreversible hearing loss. Over time, listening to all that noise may have made you a little deaf. Save the hearing you have left and consider the options available to you. Give our team a call if you are ready to book an appointment at a local hearing clinic and speak with a professional about hearing aid solutions. Even if your hearing is not what it used to be, it still helps to be prepared and limit the amount of loud sounds that reach your ears. That means - Wearing hearing protection while on the job site - Putting on noise cancelling headphones - Bringing earplugs and limiting how close you get to speakers at concerts/festivals - Limiting your exposure to overly loud places like nightclubs - Listening to music under the audiologist recommended 85 decibels Transcript: “Hi I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘If I’ve already got hearing loss, there’s no need to protect my ears from loud sounds’ - fact or fiction? Fiction. While it can be deceiving (because sounds aren’t as loud as you remember them), to your inner-ear, they are just as loud and harmful as they ever were. Therefore it is really important now - if not even more important - to protect your hearing.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
292
Share Video

0:34
Audiologists and hearing aid specialists are all in agreement that the path to better hearing is one that's best walked down together. When a loved one is continuing to live with an untreated hearing loss, refusing to speak with a professional or consider hearing aid options, they put themselves at greater risk. The chances of losing more of the hearing you do have increases, while the level of cognitive ability/brainpower will decrease. The lessened mental activity can then lead to a higher risk of developing more serious issues such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. If your loved one is living with an untreated hearing loss, it can be frustrating at times when you notice a decrease in the level of communication, but you can often be the one to inspire a change. Say What Hearing aims to bring you and the one you love back into the conversation. Dedicated to hearing loss advocacy, we are a resource for individuals with hearing loss to find their local professional and discuss the solutions available to them. If you are a wife, husband, or child of someone with hearing loss, you are in a position to help. The best way to do so is out of love. Get started by going in together to speak with a hearing professional and have an evaluation. The support of others is one of the most powerful ways to dispel some of the initial worries one may have such as, "I don't want to look older than I am" or "hearing aids aren't for me". Transcript: “Hi I’m Dr. Parrish, and this is Fact or Fiction with SayWhat. Today’s topic is: ‘Hearing loss is something I need to learn to deal with by myself’ - fact or fiction? This is fiction. Hearing loss not only affects you, but others around you. That’s why we always recommend when you come in for an evaluation that you bring a loved one with you - so that we can involve them in the process from beginning to end.” Visit us at "saywhathearing" dot com
10 Jan 2018
306
Share Video