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4:42
Natasja brilliant career and life was cut short for talented young lady shortly after finnishing her latest album "Shooting Star". Her friends got together and made this video for her. Playground Music Scandinavia.
26 Mar 2009
2941
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0:17
Krjstian Mar Hauksson of eNordic Marketing and SEMPO Scandinavia tells us about his experience at the first SEMPO Europe Summit in Prague, June 2009. *******www.sempo**** Distributed by Tubemogul.
20 Jun 2009
338
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1:28
Affinia Hotels, known for providing customized comfort to enhance every guest experience, is partnering with leading sports entertainment centers, music venues, spas, museums and attractions to extend exclusive discounts and VIP privileges to guests of Affinia's seven hotels in New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C. Chelsea Piers, Birdland Jazz Club, and Chicago's Navy Pier are among Affinia's partners providing exclusive offers to all guests. In addition, discounted spring and summer per night rates are available for travelers starting at $169 in New York City, $149 in Chicago and $129 in Washington, D.C. The partner benefits can be booked through My Affinia (www.myaffinia****), the company's revolutionary web-based customer service initiative. Featuring a completely new design with user-friendly features, My Affinia allows guests to customize their guest room and stay with a range of unique services and amenities, including golf putters, yoga mats, universal chargers and 6-choice pillow menu. Affinia Hotels, with prime locations in New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C., are designed to provide business and leisure guests with an experience of total customized comfort. Operated by Denihan Hospitality Group, a privately-owned company with more than 40 years of hospitality management expertise, Affinia Hotels is a proud member of a worldwide alliance of hotels including Joie De Vivre in the United States, Rotana Hotels in the Middle East and First Hotels in Scandinavia. For more information, visit www.affinia**** or call 1-866-AFFINIA. Produced for Affinia Hotels
5 Aug 2009
310
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4:33
This is Why - the very first single from Brothers of End! From the debut album "The End", with release in Scandinavia October 14, 2009 (konjaga/playground). For more info: www.brothersofend**** or www.myspace****/brothersofend Video made by Johan Tholson (www.tholson****)
19 Aug 2009
213
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1:10
God? Thanks for Scandinavia!
22 Aug 2009
171
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10:49
Vice Scandinavia correspondent Ivar Berglin travels to the front lines of the Vodka/Wodka Wars – and discovers that the tortured history of Russian-Polish relations can be saved in a bottle. Watch more Ivar and the Vice Guide to Travel at www.vbs.tv
27 Aug 2009
437
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0:37
*******www.jomadeals****: Skagen Sport and Glitz Ladies Watch 745SSXR. A sexy, glitzy watch for the active, modern woman. This deal of the day is $74 (60% off the $185 retail price). Sale ends at midnight tonight (EST). September 8, 2009. All the singles ladies, all the single ladies. Put your hands up. If you liked it, then you shoulda put an order on it. That’s the cheesy beginning of this posting. It’s awful, I know. But I heard that song in the car on the way to work this morning and now I can’t get it out of my head. You should feel lucky you’re not in the office today hearing me sing it and occasionally getting up from my chair to do the dance that goes along with it (okay, so I’ve also seen the music video a bunch of times, so sue me, I also like Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers, so laugh it up, it’s all out on the table now. Now I don’t have to lie and say I’m buying the adult large Jonas Brothers T-shirt for my teenage daughter). But before I digress too far, let’s talk about the watch and not my personal psychological issues. Our friends from Scandinavia bring us another gem from Denmark, the Skagen Sport and Glitz ladies watch (all the single ladies, DANG IT, it’s in my head again!) The name says it all. Glitz and Sport: a sexy, glitzy watch for the active, modern woman. It has a sleek design that will get you lots of compliments, with the functionality and reliability you need to run a hectic but happenin’ (I’m using 60’s beatnik slang here, daddy-o) life. And why not? Life was meant to be fun, beautiful, and too crazy to manage. So buy the Skagen, live your life, and try to keep only good songs stuck in your head (here’s a few to avoid. WARNING! DO NOT click the links unless you want the song to burrow itself into the center of your brain for the next week: Can’t Touch This by MC Hammer, The Song that Doesn’t End from LambChop’s Play Along, the Theme of Lambchop’s Play Along from Lambchop’s Play Along, Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler, Never Going to Give You Up by Rick Astley…crap, well now I have Rick Astley stuck in my head. That’s a billion times worse. Someone shoot me).
8 Sep 2009
317
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4:36
This is Why - the very first single from Brothers of End! From the debut album "The End", with release in Scandinavia October 14, 2009 (konjaga/playground). www.brothersofend**** www.myspace****/brothersofend Video made by Johan Tholson (www.tholson****)
19 Oct 2009
140
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1:12
*******www.ellisguitars****.au/stompbox.html The ellis stompbox and new mini ellis stompbox The Ellis Stomp Box is a hand crafted amplified solid timber box which you tap with your foot to provide a rhythm to accompany your stringed instrument playing both in the Studio and in a live situation. "A small wooden structure with a pick up inside, so guitarists can tap their feet to produce a booming percussion sound ellis guitars has made instruments for some of the worlds leading players, such as Tommy Emmanuel, Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Jamie Cullum (UK) Jeff Martin (x Canadian band The Tea Party), Canadians Harry Manx and Don Alder, Andy Mckee Bill Dutcher and Stephen Bennett - USA, Aussies Sarah McLeod, Ash grunwald, Josh Pyke, Dave Mann, Nathan Gaunt, Andrew Winton, Michael Thompson, Craig Sinclair, Khin Myint and Nathan Kaye. Ellis Guitars has been written about in some of the best music publications in the world such as Guitarist Australia and Australian Guitar magazine (AUS) Guitar Buyer and Guitar and Bass magazine (UK), Akustik Gitarre magazine (Germany), Guitar One magazine (USA) Blues Art Studio (Austria). Ellis Guitars has over 60 music stores selling their instruments and international dealers in Germany, The Netherlands, South Africa, UK, Singapore and Scandinavia. Ellis Guitars have sold instruments direct to Canada, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Finland, New Zealand and Sweden
29 Oct 2009
2627
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1:35
The Avid Cruiser visits Gammelstad, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that represents the best-preserved example of a "church village." Villages like Gammelstad were once found throughout northern Scandinavia. The 424 wooden houses that radiate from the early 15th-century stone church, were used only on Sundays and at religious festivals to house worshippers from the surrounding countryside who lived too far away from home to return on the same day. Gammelstad is fewer than 20 minutes by car or bus from where the cruise ships dock in Luleå.
2 Nov 2009
152
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5:57
The arctic zoo of Lyksele is set in north Sweden and is one of the most beautiful park in Scandinavia. During our visit we spot elks, deers, bears, seals and many other yoiful animals. The clip is part of the videoguide "Sweden- In the Land of Dalahast" you can buy at www . wocmultimedia . com/dvd/sveziauk.htm Lo zoo artico di Lyksele è uno dei più interessanti e forniti di tutta la Scandinavia. Durante la nostra visita tra i vari animali abbiamo osservato alci, orsi, daini, cervi, foche che si muovevano a loro agio in un habitat naturale ben curato. La clip fa parte dewlla videoguida "Svezia - Nel Paese dei Dalahast" in vendita sul nostro sito www . wocmultimedia . com/dvd/svezia.htm
30 Dec 2009
487
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6:05
Smart Response Media does Direct Response Marketing in Scandinavia. Se more at *******www.smartresponsemedia****. Our client base range from small mom & pop businesses to major corporations. Distributed by Tubemogul.
19 Feb 2010
173
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1:29
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
553
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2:14
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
648
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1:30
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
568
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2:00
April 17 (Bloomberg) -- Volcanic eruptions in Iceland which this week caused thousands of flights to be canceled may continue for months, disrupting European air traffic as ash is sporadically blown above the continent’s busiest airports. More than 20,000 flights have been grounded after an April 14 eruption of the 1,666-meter (5,466-foot) Eyjafjallajökull volcano sent dust billowing across thousands of miles of European airspace and closed terminals from Dublin to Moscow. “It could go on for months,” Sigrun Hreinsdottir, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland, said in a telephone interview from Reykjavik. “From what we’ve seen, it could erupt, pause for a few weeks, and then possibly erupt again.” Canceled flights are costing carriers about $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association estimates. Restrictions over most of the U.K. will remain in place until 1 p.m. at least, shutting London Heathrow, Europe’s busiest airport, and while terminals have reopened in Scotland and Ireland, others have closed as the cloud drifts southeast. Flights have been halted amid concern that the ash plume could damage engines or parts such as speed sensors. The finest material from the blast is formed of dust akin to glass, which can melt and congeal in a turbine, causing it to stop, said Sue Loughlin, head of vulcanology at the British Geological Survey. Eyjafjallajökull last erupted in December 1821, with the event lasting until January 1823. The current blast has sent ash to as high as 7 kilometers (4.5 miles), according to Gudrun Larsen, a vulcanologist at the University of Iceland. The magma had to pierce 200 meters of ice before erupting, she said. “We really don’t know if this eruption is going to last as long as the previous one, but we can’t say it’s not a possibility,” Larsen said by telephone. Fair Wind Prevailing winds may provide some respite for travelers. Air streams over Britain come from the west or southwest 70 percent of the time and would carry ash away from the major hubs such as Heathrow and Amsterdam Schiphol, said Barry Grommett, a meteorologist at the U.K. Met Office, the government forecaster. “We normally look to the Atlantic for our weather, so that’s going to move anything emitting from a volcano in Iceland away from us,” he said by telephone. “The predominant pattern would take the plume north-eastward from the eruption site.” The outlook this weekend is for westerly winds to pick up over northern Britain, shifting ash away from Scotland, while a blocking pattern may continue to keep it over England. The edge of the ash cloud was forecast to reach as far south as northern Italy and Romania and as far east as the borders of Kazakhstan as of 6 a.m. today London time, according to the Met office. Because of the wind direction Iceland’s Keflavik remains open, with North American flights to operating on schedule. BA, Ryanair Hubs serving 2 million people and 48 percent of Europe’s air traffic have been affected by the disruption, the Airports Council International industry group said yesterday in a statement, adding that situation was changing “every few hours.” British Airways Plc, which halted flights from the U.K. from midday on April 15, said last night that no services to and from London will operate today. Its shares tumbled 3.1 percent in the U.K. capital yesterday, the most since Feb 12. Ryanair Holdings Plc, the region’s largest discount carrier, canceled all flights to and from the U.K., Ireland, Scandinavia, Belgium, the Netherlands, northern France and Germany until 1 p.m. on April 19. The stock fell 2.5 percent in Dublin, the steepest drop since Feb. 5. ‘Safety First’ “This is a new situation for us,” Joe Sultana, director of airspace, network planning and navigation at Eurocontrol, which oversees the region’s flight paths, told reporters in Brussels yesterday. “We understand the economic impact to both the airlines and the European economy, but safety comes first.” Air France-KLM Group, the region’s biggest carrier, canceled all services from both Roissy-Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports near Paris until 8 a.m. today and asked passengers not to travel to the terminals. Deutsche Lufthansa AG scrapped all flights scheduled to take off or land in Germany before midday, said spokesman Jan Baerwalde by telephone. The Icelandic eruption began on March 20 with a lava flow on the eastern flank of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, according to the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland. After a lull, it erupted again early on April 14, directly under the icecap that covers most of the mountain. “The problem here is we have magma interacting with glacier ice and that leads to explosions,” Hreinsdottir said. “That causes the material to go much higher in the air.” Mike Burton, a researcher at the Italian National Vulcanology Institute who has studied the ash from the latest explosion, said it presents more of a threat to aircraft than would the dust from a typical eruption. “It’s likely that ash production will continue long after all the ice is melted in the volcano as this kind of magma can produce ash without water,” Burton said by telephone. “Fine ash is easier to transport long distances and goes higher into the atmosphere, so this is not good news for flights.”
10 May 2010
616
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