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A phonecall in the dead of night was the first inkling the people living on the Thorvaldseyri farm had that Iceland's glacier-covered Eyjafjallajokull volcano was about to erupt. Hanna Lara Andrews, a half-English, half-Icelandic farmer who lives at the foot of the mountain which exploded on Wednesday morning with ferocious power, picked up the phone at 2am to be told by a civil protection official that she had only 20 minutes to evacuate her family, including her one-year-old son. The warning was clear: if they stayed on their dairy farm they risked being washed away by torrents of meltwater unleashed by the release of energy that had just begun inside the volcano, no more than four miles above them. It would be the volcano's first major eruption since 1821, since when it has lain dormant and anonymous to most of the world. Yesterday it made headlines when it transformed swaths of western Europe and Scandinavia into an unprecedented no-fly zone. "I had a bag ready because of the recent earthquakes in the area and grabbed a few things we might need for a couple of days and we went as quickly as possible," Andrews said from a safe house yesterday. "It is a huge shock to us all and it doesn't seem real at all." Her family, including her in-laws, drove a few miles away to a farmhouse designated for evacuation in the event of such an eruption. There they waited in trepidation for the possible destruction to begin. Their herd of 60 dairy cows and all their possessions were still at the farm – the closest property to a volcano that they had thought was dormant. They were among 700 people evacuated from the area by the Icelandic civil defence authority. Many had to stay in emergency Red Cross shelters. The floods arrived early the next morning. Andrews saw them coming down the mountain. Water melted by the red hot explosive eruptions bursting through the 200m-thick glacier poured off in torrents, washing away roads and sweeping into homes, she said. "By morning we could see through breaks in the cloud a huge evaporation cloud, like a mushroom. It must have been 20,000ft [6,100 metres] high. It looked enormous, far bigger than we have ever seen before." It was such an astonishing sight, her father-in-law, Olafur Eggertson, took a picture of the eruption dwarfing the family's red-roofed farm. Such was its force that three large holes visible on the glacier turned into a continuous rift running for about a mile and a half through the ice, said Rognvaldur Olafsson, who led the rescue effort for the civil defence authority. Mercifully, the wind, blowing east, carried the plume of ash away from Reyjkavik, the capital, but across farmland, where it turned day into night as it fell and blotted out the sun. This led to speculation, later played down by experts, that the eruption may have the potential to slow global warming. One local farmer told Icelandic television that he woke yesterday morning to find a layer of ash covering everything. Residents of Kirkjubaerklaustur, about 60 miles east of the eruption, said yesterday that ash was falling thick and dark, making it difficult to see more than a few yards. "The ash is causing huge disruption to the east of the glacier," Urður Gunnarsdóttir, a press spokeswoman for the foreign ministry, said at lunchtime yesterday. "You can't see anywhere and you can't drive because it is just black, like night." Erlundur Bjornsson, a sheep farmer 95km (59 miles) east of the volcano, told the Guardian that ash had fallen heavily and it had been "almost totally dark". "The plume came over my farm a couple of hours ago, but the wind direction has changed slightly and it is very fine here, a grey dust that gets in your eyes," he said. "It covers everything and there is a smell of sulphur in the air." In the early hours of yesterday, 24 hours after the eruption began and with the volcanic activity still intensifying, according to Icelandic volcanologists, the plume had risen seven miles into the sky and had blown across the Norwegian Sea to Scandinavia, and south east across the Shetland Isles, as far as the north coast of Scotland. The Met Office in Exeter produced diagrams showing the plume doubling again and again in size as it stretched to cover an area close to the size of Western Europe. Shetland residents said the sulphuric smell of rotten eggs was strong by early yesterday morning. "I noticed a smell in the house and wondered what it was," said Joanne Jamieson, from Sandwick on the southern tip of Mainland, the biggest island in Shetland. "It was coming from the outside, so I opened the door. It was very strong, and I initially thought it was rotting seaweed. I looked down to the beach and actually looked up to see if the sky was falling in." Jane Matthews, her neighbour, said: "It smelt strongly like rotten eggs, but I didn't put two and two together realising it was coming from Iceland," Initially, I thought maybe it's something to do with my young daughter, or the animals in the field." Air traffic controllers in Aberdeen had seen the plume coming. By noon on Wednesday they had predicted that local airspace could be closed for a few hours, but by evening it was clear the situation was more serious than that. Aberdeen airport's duty manager was alerted by Nats, the air navigation service, that its local north-east airspace would be closed. At 1am on Thursday, the closure order was confirmed, affecting more than 100 commercial flights during the day. By 3am, the whole of Scotland became a no- fly zone. Before dawn the Scottish government's civil emergency resilience unit was activated. By 9.30am air traffic control charts showed that planes were only taking off and landing across southern England. Anywhere north of that, the skies were empty. At 11am Gatwick's busy tarmac apron was at a standstill as airport managers prepared for a national shutdown of British airspace, which began at noon. Russell Craig, head of communications at Manchester airport, where 45,000 passengers were affected and hundreds of flights were cancelled, said: "It is difficult for passengers to understand because the planes are there and the sky is blue, but it would be dangerous to fly a plane in these conditions." Small aircraft were able to take off, said Craig, and the airport remained open in case a long-haul plane needed to execute an emergency landing. By 2.30pm the vast cloud had reached across England, and fears that its fine particles could cause passenger jets to crash caused an unprecedented shutdown of all of Britain's airports. No flights were to be allowed in or out until 7am this morning at the earliest.
10 May 2010
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5:25
The Firm [Indonesia] - Narapidana Live at Super Youth 2. Scandinavia - FX Life Style 2010
18 Jul 2010
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3:00
With water on three sides, beautiful light and a thriving fishing culture, Skagen in Denmark attracted painters from all over Scandinavia. From here they started a revolution i Danish art.
25 Oct 2010
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2:23
ASSA ABLOY Mobile Keys provides hotel guests with mobile check-in before arrival. The room key is sent directly to the guests' mobile phones. Easy and stress-free. More on *******www.assaabloy****/assaabloymob... A world's first pilot is starting at the Clarion Hotel Stockholm in Sweden. ASSA ABLOY, Choice Hotels Scandinavia, TeliaSonera, VingCard Elsafe and Venyon, a fully owned subsidiary of Giesecke & Devrient, have joined forces to replace hotel room keys with NFC-enabled mobile phones.
3 Nov 2010
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0:20
Relentless BIGAIR Stuttgart 2011 Stuttgart is famous for making great leaps forward in sports. But if you wanted to see Backflips, Double Corks and Frontside Spins, you had to travel to the USA, to Scandinavia or at least to Innsbruck, Austria – to the Top-Snowboard-Events in the world. On January 4/5, 2011 the state capital is initially going to be in the focus of the international snowboard-scene: ‘Relentless BIGAIR Stuttgart’ is not only going to invite the world’s best riders to the Neckar – the Swabian metropolis will host Germany’s second biggest Snowboard-Contest. The new freestyle event is going to be part of the prestigious Swatch TTR World Snowboard Tour. Relentless BIGAIR Stuttgart is going to take place directly in the city – in the Neckarpark between Cannstatter Wasen and the Mercedes-Benz-Arena on parking area P9. Centrepiece and sensational eyecatcher of the two-day event is going to be the 36 metre high ramp, from which the boarders will show hazardous tricks before landing in the sweet spot. To satisfy the international contest criteria 250 tons of steel are necessary. After the landing a staircaseis waiting for the riders and they can show their skills sliding down the combination of stairs and rails as artistic as possible. A jury is judging the jumps and tricks altogether. The rider leading after both judgements awaits not only an enormous prize money of US$ 50,000, but also a bunch of world ranking points. The best known companies and retailers in the snowboard business will get the opportunity to make an appearance on January 4/5 in Stuttgart as well. On both days the fair ‘Brandstation’ will take place and firms will present trends and innovations in the scene. The ‘Brandstation’ is open to all visitors. Everyone who wants to get in the right mood for the main event on Wednesday can come by on Tuesday and watch the practice session – for free! - www.ttrworldtour****
10 Jan 2011
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1:08
Take a tour of Uppsala Cathedral in Uppsala, Sweden – part of the World’s Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. Uppsala, Sweden holds the honor of being the home of the largest cathedral in all of Scandinavia. It was 1287 when the first parts of the cathedral were constructed, though the structure was not finished until much later. The Uppsala Cathedral was originally a Catholic church, but became Lutheran with the coming of the Protestant Reformation. At its tallest, the prominent towers that pierce the sky above the church reach a height of nearly four hundred feet. The cathedral's beautiful red brick walls and black roofs set it apart from many other medieval religious structures. Within these massive walls are a museum, the tombs of many of Sweden's most important citizens, and numerous exquisite paintings and murals.
15 Feb 2011
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1:09
Juste Debout 3 times world finalist in experimental Juste Debout Scandinavia Popping 2nd place Juste Debout Finland popping 1st place Juste Debout Finland hiphop newstyle 2nd place Finnish Championships House 2nd place Finnish Salsa amateurs 1st place KPO Breaks old school bboying 1st place Co-organizer of first Nordic Moves and SADE festivals
16 Feb 2011
700
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1:33
Juste Debout 3 times world finalist in experimental Juste Debout Scandinavia Popping 2nd place Juste Debout Finland popping 1st place Juste Debout Finland hiphop newstyle 2nd place Finnish Championships House 2nd place Finnish Salsa amateurs 1st place KPO Breaks old school bboying 1st place Co-organizer of first Nordic Moves and SADE festivals
16 Feb 2011
1438
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0:57
Juste Debout 3 times world finalist in experimental Juste Debout Scandinavia Popping 2nd place Juste Debout Finland popping 1st place Juste Debout Finland hiphop newstyle 2nd place Finnish Championships House 2nd place Finnish Salsa amateurs 1st place KPO Breaks old school bboying 1st place Co-organizer of first Nordic Moves and SADE festivals
16 Feb 2011
690
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0:55
Juste Debout 3 times world finalist in experimental Juste Debout Scandinavia Popping 2nd place Juste Debout Finland popping 1st place Juste Debout Finland hiphop newstyle 2nd place Finnish Championships House 2nd place Finnish Salsa amateurs 1st place KPO Breaks old school bboying 1st place Co-organizer of first Nordic Moves and SADE festivals
15 Feb 2011
206
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2:27
After 30, 000 kilometers or 19, 000 miles traveling around the world the Mercedes-Benz F-CELL World Drive is back home. The circumnavigation around the globe has impressively proven that the Mercedes-Benz fuel cell technology is ready for every day use. The hydrogen powered full electric vehicles have a range of up to 400 kilometers or 250 miles. The hydrogen tank can be refilled within 3 minutes and the F-CELLS drive completely locally emission free. The Drive that also celebrated the 125th birthday of Mercedes-Benz began on January 29th with German chancellor Angela Merkel at hand; drove westward through Europe the USA, Australia and China, then to Kazakhstan, Russian and Scandinavia returning to Germany.
7 Jun 2011
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2:26
BY AUSTIN FAX ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY The vote has been tallied and for the first time in history-- Denmark will have a female prime minister. Helle Thorning-Schmidt-- the daughter-in-law of Welsh political icon Neil Kinnock -- led the Social Democrats to a landmark victory. The Telegraph caught up with her supporters after the announcement on Thursday. SUPPORTER 1: “I’m so happy, I’m so happy, I can’t describe it.” SUPPORTER 2: “It’s indescribable. You can feel the happiness, it’s pure happiness coming from this room.” (Room jumping up and down in jubilation) But the London Evening Standard’s Tom Harper thinks it’s a miracle Thorning-Schmidt was able to win. Her family is thought to have a political curse on it -- and rumors have been swirling her husband is gay and they are separating. “Helle denounced ‘grotesque’ rumours that she had separated from the former Labour leader's son Stephen. [The rumours] raised the spectre of a ‘Kinnock curse,’ recalling her father-in-law 1992 general election defeat in Britain after he appeared to be clear favourite to win. ... He later blamed smears in the press for the defeat.” Thorning-Schmidt takes over the office as Denmark suffers its worst recession since World War II. BBC’s Jonathan Josephs says her economic plan helped her win over the people. “It’s an economy with one of the world’s highest tax burdens and a heavy reliance on exports. The Social Democrats hope to revive it with a $1.5 billion stimulus package and higher taxes for banks and the wealthy.” Referred to as “Gucci Helle” because of her affinity for fashion -- The Christian Science Monitor’s Robert Marquand thinks the election results could give the political landscape in Denmark a makeover. “Female politicians are not unusual in Scandinavia. But a new left coalition and a young female leader may change Denmark’s image as an increasingly closed and often Europhobic state that this summer tried to create separate border control stations, angering Germany and European Union officials.” The Social Democratic Party now holds a five-seat advantage in the Danish Parliament. The Guardian’s Robin Pettitt says with such a slim advantage, he wouldn’t want to be in the new Prime Minister’s shoes. “Thorning-Schmidt has been dealt an unenviable hand, both by the electorate and the international economic crisis. The Danish economy is not as troubled as many other European countries, but unpopular measures will still have to be taken.”
17 Sep 2011
494
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0:12
*******www.maria-johnsen****/zaixian-yingxiao/ Attention Chinese companies & businesses, Maria Johnsen can increase your sales and ranking in Europa, Canada, USA, Scandinavia . Contact Maria today.
19 Dec 2011
348
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0:33
*******maria-johnsen****/zaixian-yingxiao/ SEO China at maria-johnsen**** offers website marketing for Chinese business owners who wish to promote their products in North America, Europe and Scandinavia.
21 Dec 2011
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0:49
*******golden-way-media**** multilingual seo services fofr multilingual websites. We promote sites in Scandinavia, Europe, USA, Canada & Australia
21 Mar 2012
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4:34
The enjoi luxury cruise has set sail for Russia, Scandinavia, and Atlantis! Join Louie Barletta, Jerry Hsu, Cairo Foster, Nestor Judkins, Ben Raemers, plus new ams Ryan Lay and Zack Wallin, and flow mate Barney Page
14 May 2012
388
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