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Popular scientist Dr Chris Smith presents a radio programme on parasites and ultraviolet LED's for clean water. The Naked Scientists are a media-savvy group of physicians and researchers from Cambridge University who use radio, live lectures, and the Internet to strip science down to its bare essentials, and promote it to the general public. Each week, listeners of all ages and backgrounds tune in on a Sunday evening to hear creator Dr. Chris Smith, together with his entertaining sidekicks, interview renowned scientists and researchers from all over the world and take science questions on any subject live from the listening public. To find more video from the Cambridge Science Festival, and more free science video from other places, visit *******www.sciencelive****
20 Mar 2007
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0:53
Have no fear, the bra scientist is here...
29 Aug 2007
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0:35
stay smart scientist!
25 Sep 2007
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0:43
If the name The Atomic Brain didn’t tip you off, this film is gruesome science fiction at its campiest. This vintage piece of “bad” cinema is as great to laugh at as it is creepy. It’s so wonderfully bad that it aired on Mystery Science Theater 3000. Morbid, sick, sexy, and silly, the story revolves around an old woman who coaxes her mad scientist lover to transfer her brain into the body of a young vixen. But first she must find the hottest girl! In a bizarre sort of beauty pageant, young women are conned into the house where they’re then appraised. The mixture of sex, fake science, exploitation, bad acting, and pure ridiculousness make The Atomic Brain the perfect unintentional comedy.
16 Nov 2007
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0:45
Scientist
23 Dec 2007
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0:53
the bra scientist very funny
30 Dec 2007
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6:52
Black Inventors and Scientists - Philip Emeagwali Excerpt from: TIME magazine *******www.time****/time/2007/blackhistmth/bios/04.html BLACK HISTORY MONTH by Madison Gray EMEAGWALI . COM P H I L I P E M E A G W A L I A C a l c u l a t i n g M o v e It's hard to say who invented the Internet. There were many mathematicians and scientists who contributed to its development; computers were sending signals to each other as early as the 1950s. But the Web owes much of its existence to Philip Emeagwali, a math whiz who came up with the formula for allowing a large number of computers to communicate at once. Emeagwali was born to a poor family in Akure, Nigeria, in 1954. Despite his brain for math, he had to drop out of school because his family, who had become war refugees, could no longer afford to send him. As a young man, he earned a general education certificate from the University of London and later degrees from George Washington University and the University of Maryland, as well as a doctoral fellowship from the University of Michigan. At Michigan, he participated in the scientific community's debate on how to simulate the detection of oil reservoirs using a supercomputer. Growing up in an oil-rich nation and understanding how oil is drilled, Emeagwali decided to use this problem as the subject of his doctoral dissertation. Borrowing an idea from a science fiction story about predicting the weather, Emeagwali decided that rather than using 8 expensive supercomputers he would employ thousands of microprocessors to do the computation. The only step left was to find 8 machines and connect them. (Remember, it was the 80s.) Through research, he found a machine called the Connection Machine at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, which had sat unused after scientists had given up on figuring out how to make it simulate nuclear explosions. The machine was designed to run 65,536 interconnected microprocessors. In 1987, he applied for and was given permission to use the machine, and remotely from his Ann Arbor, Michigan, location he set the parameters and ran his program. In addition to correctly computing the amount of oil in the simulated reservoir, the machine was able to perform 3.1 billion calculations per second. The crux of the discovery was that Emeagwali had programmed each of the microprocessors to talk to six neighboring microprocessors at the same time. The success of this record-breaking experiment meant that there was now a practical and inexpensive way to use machines like this to speak to each other all over the world. Within a few years, the oil industry had seized upon this idea, then called the Hyperball International Network creating a virtual world wide web of ultrafast digital communication. The discovery earned him the Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineers' Gordon Bell Prize in 1989, considered the Nobel Prize of computing, and he was later hailed as one of the fathers of the Internet. Since then, he has won more than 100 prizes for his work and Apple computer has used his microprocessor technology in their Power Mac G4 model. Today he lives in Washington with his wife and son. The
9 Feb 2009
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4:20
The University of Richmond's co-ed a cappella group Off the Cuff performs "The Scientist" for Family Weekend 2006 (15-17 September).
22 Jul 2009
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3:37
Please watch this new clip from, We Are Scientists, 'Chick Lit', from the album, Brain Thrust Mastery.
5 May 2008
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4:46
The Scientist by Coldplay Other Accounts:
28 Jul 2008
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3:45
Behind the scenes video from the making of the We Are Scientists music video, “Impatience.” For more info on We Are Scientists check out: *******www.wearescientists****/ *******www.myspace****/wearescientists *******phobos.apple****/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewAlbum?id=278426999&s=143441
13 Aug 2008
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1:20
Dr. Jeff Friedman explains how he became a research scientist. *******www.bigthink****/thinksciencenow
19 Aug 2008
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