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Popular scientist Dr Chris Smith presents a radio programme on parasites and ultraviolet LED's for clean water. The Naked Scientists are a media-savvy group of physicians and researchers from Cambridge University who use radio, live lectures, and the Internet to strip science down to its bare essentials, and promote it to the general public. Each week, listeners of all ages and backgrounds tune in on a Sunday evening to hear creator Dr. Chris Smith, together with his entertaining sidekicks, interview renowned scientists and researchers from all over the world and take science questions on any subject live from the listening public. To find more video from the Cambridge Science Festival, and more free science video from other places, visit *******www.sciencelive****
20 Mar 2007
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0:53
Have no fear, the bra scientist is here...
29 Aug 2007
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stay smart scientist!
25 Sep 2007
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0:43
If the name The Atomic Brain didn’t tip you off, this film is gruesome science fiction at its campiest. This vintage piece of “bad” cinema is as great to laugh at as it is creepy. It’s so wonderfully bad that it aired on Mystery Science Theater 3000. Morbid, sick, sexy, and silly, the story revolves around an old woman who coaxes her mad scientist lover to transfer her brain into the body of a young vixen. But first she must find the hottest girl! In a bizarre sort of beauty pageant, young women are conned into the house where they’re then appraised. The mixture of sex, fake science, exploitation, bad acting, and pure ridiculousness make The Atomic Brain the perfect unintentional comedy.
16 Nov 2007
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Scientist
23 Dec 2007
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0:53
the bra scientist very funny
30 Dec 2007
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6:52
Black Inventors and Scientists - Philip Emeagwali Excerpt from: TIME magazine *******www.time****/time/2007/blackhistmth/bios/04.html BLACK HISTORY MONTH by Madison Gray EMEAGWALI . COM P H I L I P E M E A G W A L I A C a l c u l a t i n g M o v e It's hard to say who invented the Internet. There were many mathematicians and scientists who contributed to its development; computers were sending signals to each other as early as the 1950s. But the Web owes much of its existence to Philip Emeagwali, a math whiz who came up with the formula for allowing a large number of computers to communicate at once. Emeagwali was born to a poor family in Akure, Nigeria, in 1954. Despite his brain for math, he had to drop out of school because his family, who had become war refugees, could no longer afford to send him. As a young man, he earned a general education certificate from the University of London and later degrees from George Washington University and the University of Maryland, as well as a doctoral fellowship from the University of Michigan. At Michigan, he participated in the scientific community's debate on how to simulate the detection of oil reservoirs using a supercomputer. Growing up in an oil-rich nation and understanding how oil is drilled, Emeagwali decided to use this problem as the subject of his doctoral dissertation. Borrowing an idea from a science fiction story about predicting the weather, Emeagwali decided that rather than using 8 expensive supercomputers he would employ thousands of microprocessors to do the computation. The only step left was to find 8 machines and connect them. (Remember, it was the 80s.) Through research, he found a machine called the Connection Machine at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, which had sat unused after scientists had given up on figuring out how to make it simulate nuclear explosions. The machine was designed to run 65,536 interconnected microprocessors. In 1987, he applied for and was given permission to use the machine, and remotely from his Ann Arbor, Michigan, location he set the parameters and ran his program. In addition to correctly computing the amount of oil in the simulated reservoir, the machine was able to perform 3.1 billion calculations per second. The crux of the discovery was that Emeagwali had programmed each of the microprocessors to talk to six neighboring microprocessors at the same time. The success of this record-breaking experiment meant that there was now a practical and inexpensive way to use machines like this to speak to each other all over the world. Within a few years, the oil industry had seized upon this idea, then called the Hyperball International Network creating a virtual world wide web of ultrafast digital communication. The discovery earned him the Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineers' Gordon Bell Prize in 1989, considered the Nobel Prize of computing, and he was later hailed as one of the fathers of the Internet. Since then, he has won more than 100 prizes for his work and Apple computer has used his microprocessor technology in their Power Mac G4 model. Today he lives in Washington with his wife and son. The
9 Feb 2009
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4:20
The University of Richmond's co-ed a cappella group Off the Cuff performs "The Scientist" for Family Weekend 2006 (15-17 September).
22 Jul 2009
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3:37
Please watch this new clip from, We Are Scientists, 'Chick Lit', from the album, Brain Thrust Mastery.
5 May 2008
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4:46
The Scientist by Coldplay Other Accounts:
28 Jul 2008
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3:45
Behind the scenes video from the making of the We Are Scientists music video, “Impatience.” For more info on We Are Scientists check out: *******www.wearescientists****/ *******www.myspace****/wearescientists *******phobos.apple****/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewAlbum?id=278426999&s=143441
13 Aug 2008
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1:20
Dr. Jeff Friedman explains how he became a research scientist. *******www.bigthink****/thinksciencenow
19 Aug 2008
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Have no fear the bra scientist is here .. awesome kung fu kick ... do not approach her with a survey or questionnaire be Warned.!! Quick fun commercial sketch.
24 Oct 2008
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3:56
Multi-instrumentalist Jason Crosby (Robert Randolph, Susan Tedeschi, Eric Clapton) performs the song "Rockhead Scientist" while recording his album Four Chords and Seven Notes Ago."
22 Nov 2008
240
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1:59
WASHINGTON — A blue-ribbon panel of scientists is trying to determine the best way to detect and ward off any wandering space rocks that might be on a collision course with Earth. ``We're looking for the killer asteroid,'' James Heasley , of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy , last week told the committee that the National Academy of Sciences created at Congress' request. Congress asked the academy to conduct the study after astronomers were unable to eliminate an extremely slight chance that an asteroid called Apophis will slam into Earth with devastating effect in 2036. Apophis was discovered in 2004 about 17 million miles from Earth on a course that would overlap our planet's orbit in 2029 and return seven years later. Observers said that the asteroid — a massive boulder left over from the birth of the solar system — is about 1,000 feet wide and weighs at least 50 million tons. After further observations, astronomers reported that the asteroid would skim by Earth harmlessly in 2029, but it has a one in 44,000 probability of slamming into our planet on Easter Sunday , April 13, 2036 . Small changes in Apophis' path that could make the difference between a hit or a miss are possible, according to Jon Giorgini , a planetary analyst in NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. ``We have not eliminated the threat in 2036,'' Lindley Johnson , the manager of NASA's asteroid detection program, told the committee. The academy panel is headed by Irwin Shapiro , a former director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. It has a two-part assignment from Congress : Detect and deflect asteroids that might hit earth. First, the Shapiro committee is supposed to propose the best way to detect and analyze 90 percent of the so-called ``near Earth objects'' orbiting between Mars and Venus that are wider than 460 feet by 2020. About 20 percent of these are identified as potentially hazardous objects because they might pass within 5 million miles of Earth (20 times the distance to the Moon). More than 5,000 near Earth objects, including 789 potentially hazardous objects, have been identified so far. Johnson predicted that future surveys will find at least 66,000 near Earth objects and 18,000 potentially hazardous objects. A collision with one or more of these many objects littering the solar system is inevitable, Johnson said. ``Once every hundred years there might be something to worry about, but it could happen tomorrow.'' For example, astronomers had only 24 hours' notice of a small asteroid that blew up over northern Africa on Oct. 7 . A larger, more dangerous object presumably would be spotted years or decades ahead, giving humans time to change its course before it hit. The Shapiro panel's second task is to review various methods that have been proposed to deflect or destroy an incoming asteroid and recommend the best options. They include a nuclear bomb, conventional explosives or a spacecraft that would push or pull the asteroid off its course. Offbeat ideas are painting the surface of the asteroid so that the sun's rays would heat it differently and alter its direction, and a ``gravity tractor, ''a satellite that would fly close to the asteroid, gently nudging it aside. The earlier that a dangerous asteroid is found, and the farther it is from Earth, the easier it will be to change its trajectory, panel members were told. A relatively small force would be enough while the object is millions of miles away. The year 2029 could be crucial. When Apophis makes its first pass by Earth, its track can be more precisely determined. That will enable astronomers to judge whether Earth will escape with a near miss or will have to take swift action to avoid a blow that could devastate a region as large as Europe or the Eastern United States . To deflect an asteroid, scientists need to know its shape, weight and composition. A ball of loose rubble would be handled differently from a solid metallic rock. ``Finding them is one thing, but you have to know your enemy,'' said James Green , the director of NASA's Planetary Science Division. So far, NASA has spent $41 million on asteroid detection and deflection, but the Near Earth Object Program is running out of money. ``It's just barely hanging on,'' Shapiro said. Two expensive telescopes to focus on dangerous asteroids have been proposed, but Congress and the incoming Obama administration must be persuaded to approve the money. ``Without new telescopes, we'd never get to 90 percent (detection),'' Johnson said. After a lot of original skepticism, Congress now looks favorably on the asteroid project, according to Richard Obermann , the staff director of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics. ``There used to be a high giggle factor among members,'' Obermann said. ``But it's now a very respectable area of investigation.'' Johnson told the Shapiro committee that the search for killer asteroids must have a high priority. ``The space program could provide humanity few greater legacies than to know the time and place of any cosmic destruction to allow ample time to prepare our response to that inevitable event,'' he said. ON THE WEB NASA's Near Earth Object Program Near Earth Environment animation 2007-08 MORE FROM MCCLATCHY Evidence found of solar system around nearby star Arctic temperatures hit record high Will new Mars lander be parked or scrapped?
19 Dec 2008
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