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2:15
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource business news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. First up, world news. Violence escalates in Libya, and Al Jazeera estimates at least 250 people may have died in the capital city Tripoli overnight. In this Al Jazeera exclusive video, protesters are shown trying to escape gunfire. International Federation of Human Rights puts the death toll overall at about 300 to 400 people. The Guardian reports the UN Security Council is going to meet in a closed session to discuss Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi’s brutal crackdown on protesters. Libya's deputy ambassador to the UN has appealed for starting a no-fly zone over the country, to help stop "a real genocide.” Still in world news — a devastating 6.3 magnitude earthquake hit the New Zealand city Christchurch last night. Sources including the New Zealand Herald say at least 65 people are killed. Rescue efforts continue, as 100 others are feared trapped. Yesterday’s quake was not as powerful as the one that struck Christchurch last September, but it did have a shallower epicenter, which lead to more damage. (Video: Sky News) In business news — the escalating violence in Libya is pushing oil prices to rise and European and Asian shares to fall. The New York Times says light, sweet crude oil for April delivery surged to $97 a barrel in pre-market trading. Libya has the largest oil reserves in Africa, and prices might rise even more should the world gets cut off from Libya’s supply. In U.S news -- thousands of Chicago voters will head to the polls today ready to elect a fresh new face in the mayor’s office. Former Mayor Richard Daley conceded to run for a record seventh term in office -- leaving his coveted 22 year seat as mayor up for grabs. ABC News reports the latest polls show front runner Rahm Emanuel well ahead of his rivals. Former Senator Carol Moseley Braun and city official Gerry Chico are expected to gain on his lead -- but it’s not likely they’ll survive the day. All of the candidates have had their fair share of trouble on the campaign trail -- Braun used the words “rape and robbery” to describe her opponents and Emanuel’s ballot fiasco questioned whether or not the former White House Chief of Staff still lived in the Windy City. The polls close at 7 pm and only one lucky candidate can inherit the $655 million budget gap the former administration left behind. Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Erik Shute -- highlighting the top headlines making you smarter -- faster. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
26 Feb 2011
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2:14
BY: SAMUEL JOSEPH ANCHOR: CHANCE SEALES You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Thousands are fleeing Libya as unrest grows, heading for neighboring countries Egypt and Tunisia. Egypt is reportedly absorbing the influx well, since many of the refugees are Egyptian natives who were working abroad. However, according to Sky News, the situation at the Tunisian border is much different. TIM MARSHALL: “As the light falls, so does the temperature, and it gets very cold at night. But we’ve met people who have slept outside for three nights running. Five Hundred tents are up already. Another thousand are going to be put up. That will house about twelve thousand people. Sounds like a lot. But, if people are coming through at the rate of about ten thousand a day, well, where are they going to go?” Reports indicate the refugees are stretching Tunisia’s resources to the limit, with more than one thousand people crossing the border every hour. The Guardian spoke with the executive director of the World Food Programme, who says... “...the local Red Crescent organisations and the revolutionary committees set up during the Tunisian uprising had been doing an ‘excellent’ job providing food and shelter, but... ‘the system is now under severe stress.’” The United Nations is also helping out- providing tents, food and medical supplies, but Press TV says- many feel the UN isn’t doing enough. LASAAD SOUIAL: “Where is the U.N.? Where are they? They came yesterday with some tents to show off in front of cameras, waking up at noon from their hotel in Zarzis. You know? Come again, and you can notice they are clean. Look at me. You know? They are doing nothing.” It might not be that simple, though. According to Channel 4 News, the problem isn’t necessarily the crowds, it’s moving the crowds. “There’s no shortage of food or water and these people are not, by any means, desperate. The problem is getting the transport to shift them on to the airport – to get the buses to do that, to get the planes to fly them home.” Responding to this, Britain and France have stepped up to get the refugees where they need to go. The Daily Mail reports... “...Prime Minister David Cameron said he had launched an airlift to help Egyptians stranded on the Libyan-Tunisian border. France, too, announced an airlift and naval operation... to evacuate at least 5,000 Egyptian refugees and return them to Egypt within a week.” The United Nations has suspended Libya from the UN Human Rights Council for committing quote “gross and systematic violations of human rights.’’ 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Transcript by Newsy
5 Mar 2011
310
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2:06
BY CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR SALEM SOLOMAN You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy “A new day and a nightmare for quake victims in Japan.” (Video Source: CNN) “...has some Japanese calling this Japan’s Chernobyl.” (Video Source: CBS) JOHN LARGE: “...and we know about 170,000 people have now been evacuated, so clearly they are preparing for the worst case.” (Video Source: ITN) From earthquakes, to tsunamis, to nuclear meltdowns, it’s hard to imagine things getting much worse for Japan--but where there’s a media, there’s a way. One theme dominating the coverage is “can it get any worse?” Media outlets take a look at the worst case scenarios. (Video Source: RT) “There are now three power plants in Japan where there are fears about radiation.” (Video Source: Sky News) “..***uld overheat and meltdown, releasing radioactivity into the environment.” (Video Source: MSN) “Japan has declared an emergency alert at another nuclear power plant in the Northeast of the country. Radiation levels of about 700 times higher than normal have reportedly been detected.” (Video Source: RT) One YouTube user was compelled enough to warn Americans of impending radioactive doom. “The wind was blowing to the east of Japan, and the picture you’re looking at suggests where it’s gonna go. With the current... situation, wind current and so on and so forth, so I don’t know what more to say to you, I don’t have the knowledge to advise you anymore... ” Fox News interviewed nuclear power expert Joe Cirincione, who says the likelihood of America having a similar fate is very, very possible. “[A] trifecta of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown in the U.S. remains a possibility...Diablo Canyon in California is ‘a classic case of a very large nuclear reactor in an area that's seismically active...’” ...and the disaster anxiety has indeed spread overseas. A writer for Canada Free Press imagines a monster volcano exploding in the U.S. “If the Yellowstone Park caldera, the largest potential volcano in the U.S. should explode, it would have a comparable affect and there isn’t a damn thing that can be done about it.” Keep up with the latest on the Japanese disaster by downloading the latest Newsy iphone app. You can now stream our videos through your Apple TV – it’s free from the iTunes Store. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
15 Mar 2011
976
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2:55
BY ERIK SHUTE AND HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource breaking news analysis from Newsy This is Newsy Now and here are the headlines you need to know. First up — world news. A surge in radiation levels in Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant has forced a temporary stoppage to stabilizing efforts. But a recent update on CNN says the plant’s heroic employees are back on the job again, even though they may be facing a lethal dose of radiation. Traces of radiation have been found in tap water 50 miles away from the nuclear power plant. Japanese Emperor Akihito made a rare, televised address early Wednesday — offering his condolences to victims’ families, while also reminding his people not to give up. Snowfall is currently slowing down much of the country’s relief efforts. (Video: Sky News) Still in world news — an update on Libya. Muammar Gaddafi’s forces are inching closer to overtaking anti-government forces in Benghazi. euronews interviewed a military spokesman who says air strikes on Benghazi have begun. “He said, Gaddafi’s army have reached the frontier with Egypt, and Benghazi is now completely surrounded. Most residents have now reportedly fled the city, leaving it in the hands of rebels, who are gearing up for an all-out attack. Which, if successful, could prove to be the decisive factor for the control of Libya.” Still in the Middle East — Bahrain’s rulers have declared a 3-month long state of emergency, as violence continues to escalate. NewsX reports — the rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia may be worsening Bahrain’s situation. “One Saudi soldier was shot dead last night as protesters in Bahrain demonstrated against the entry of Saudi and military force in the country. ... Iran has called the presence of the foreign troops as unacceptable, and says it will complicate the political crisis.” In U.S. news -- Another tour bus crash in New Jersey has killed two people and injured the remaining 41 passengers. It’s the second crash in three days -- and now New York’s finest have had enough. WABC reports. “Descending on Chinatown tuesday, the NYPD taking six tour buses off the road in an aggressive crackdown. Among the buses accused of being unsafe, one belonging to Worldwide Tours, the company that operated the bus on Saturday. Another a super luxury tour bus, the same company from Monday's crash in New Jersey.” In the tech world -- Netflix is not just for streaming movies anymore. The company will reportedly begin funding an original series, while hoping to take over the streaming market. Mashable says the mega-movie-mogul is looking to be “the next HBO.” It’s rumored to have its eyes on remaking the UK political drama, House of Cards, starring Kevin Spacey. Netflix will reportedly dish out $100 million for the rights to air the series, thus entering into the fray with a competitive pool of premium cable channels. One reason for expansion? LA Times reports, Netflix is responsible for 61% of all movies streamed online -- that’s more than all of its competitors combined. Stay with Newsy**** for more analysis on news throughout the day. For Newsy Now, I’m Jim Flink -- highlighting the top headlines making your smarter, faster. 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
672
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2:37
BY PAUL ROLFE You're watching multisource environment news analysis For the first time -- the Environmental Protection Agency is setting limits on mercury emissions and other pollutants from power plants. While health officials and enviros are applauding the proposed rules -- power companies say the limits will be the end of them. Fox News suggests job losses will be too great. “A recent report says the mercury rule could lead to the closing of nearly 18 percent of the nation’s coal-fired facilities. That could mean the loss of nearly a quarter million jobs... And Missouri’s Claire McCaskill is also complaining about the EPA, she says: The people in my state want clean air and clean water, but farmers and businesses in our state don’t want nonsensical regulations that harm their ability to make a living.” But the overall effect on jobs is up for debate. In an op-ed for the Huffington Post EPA administrator Lisa Jackson says -- the rules will actually spur investment and create jobs. “The Mercury and Air Toxics Standards will increase demand for pollution-control technology that is already being produced by American companies... We estimate these first-ever standards will support 31,000 construction jobs and 9,000 long-term utility jobs.” Putting those two estimates together indicates more jobs would be lost than gained. But Grist adds -- the costs of complying will be outweighed by public health benefits. “[T]he proposed standards are estimated to yield monetized benefits of $59 billion to $140 billion annually, compared to annual compliance costs of approximately $10.9 billion. This represents $5 to $13 in health benefits for every $1 spent to reduce pollution.” The rules would reduce mercury emissions by 91 percent, particulate matter by 30 percent and sulfur dioxide by 53 percent. So, how dangerous is mercury? Less than a teaspoon of it can contaminate a 20 acre lake -- and pregnant women have been urged to avoid eating fish because mercury contamination has been linked to birth defects. (Clean Skies News) Clean Skies News reports -- in the last decade, the power industry has done little to reduce its mercury emissions. “Despite years of promises, the electric power industry has barely made a dent in its mercury emissions this decade. And this slow progress is nowhere near the levels that would be achieved if all power plants installed the modern pollution controls that are widely available and already in use at some power plants today.” *******cleanskies.tv/videos/epa-attacks-mercury-emissions.html The EPA tried to put in a cap and trade program for mercury in 2003, but a federal court decided that program wasn’t good enough. These new rules are expected to be finalized in November and give power plants three years to comply. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Mar 2011
533
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2:45
BY TRACY PFEIFFER and CHRISTINE SLUSSER ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy Embattled Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi has violated his own cease-fire, moving troops into the rebel stronghold of Benghazi early Saturday morning. Media on the ground in the north African country report heavy gunfire and bombings throughout the city as government and resistance fighters clash. The United Nations Security Council approved a no-fly zone for Libya on Thursday, and Gaddafi’s ceasefire declaration came soon after -- though many Western leaders expressed skepticism. (Video: One TV) A downed plane became the focal point of the action, with conflicting reports on who shot the plane down -- and who it belonged to. REPORTER: “It now appears this may have been an [muffle] goal -- the rebels shooting down one of the jets on their side.” (Video: Al Jazeera) REPORTER: “It does appear -- from the cheers we’ve heard on the ground here -- that the rebels have managed to shoot down one of Gaddafi’s war planes.” (Video: Sky News) ITN has video of a Libyan spokesman reading a letter from Gaddafi-- in it, he says the UN has no right to intervene. “Libya is not yours. Libya is for all Libyans. The resolutions of the security council are invalid, because the security council is not authorized, according to the UN charter, to intervene in the internal affairs of any country. This is injustice. It’s a clear aggression.” ...and if country’s do begin to raid, France 24 reports the allies will have state-of-the-art equipment. “France will likely use its Rafale and Mirage flighter aircraft, the U.S. operates F-18 Super Hornets, while the UK will use Tornado and Typhoon aircraft. A number of other countries could take part, including Norway, Denmark and Belgium. While possible contributions from Qatar and the UAE would be diplomatically significant from those western nations keen to have support from the Arab world.” Finally, a British Labour Party MP tells RT, even though a international military intervention is what people have been calling for -- it doesn’t mean the day is saved. JEREMY CORBYN, BRITISH LABOUR PARTY MP: “I suspect the real problem is they’re going to have to strike against targets in the cities -- and that will result in a large number of civilian causalities. This is a terrible situation and I would hope, even at these last hours, there will be frantic efforts by the UN representative to try to bring about a renewed ceasefire so that these strikes don't’ actually happen. An awful lot of innocent people are gonna die.” Media indicate French aircraft have already entered Libyan airspace, and the New York Times reports quote- “American, European and Arab leaders began the largest international military intervention in the Arab world since the invasion of Iraq.” (Info: NY Times) 'Like Newsy' on Facebook for daily updates Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
22 Mar 2011
561
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1:51
BY HARUMENDHAH HELMY You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy At least 22 Yemeni officials have defected from the regime, following last Friday’s violent crackdown on protesters in Sanaa. President Ali Abdullah Saleh sacked all of his ministers Sunday, but the move seemed to flat fall flat on the officials who announced their defection Monday. Sky News says among them are three high-ranking army commanders: two brigadier generals and one major general. “I’ve heard one of them giving an interview on at least one television channel, announcing that there were a whole string of defection in the army in the northwest and in the northeast that they were upset about the constitution being violated and they were moving in on Sanaa to maintain security and stability.” Bloomberg talks to one expert who says Brigadier General Muhssein's defection is very significant. “This is really moving in the direction that would lead to the fall of the regime. Muhssein is trying to get ahead of the curve, taking a page out of what’s happening in Egypt.” But, as another analyst explains on the BBC, the participation of the military is not without its dangers. “Pro-democracy protesters are nervous that their popular revolution will be hijacked by established military and commercial interests, who will simply nominate a new face to govern the country without making any substantial changes to the status quo.” According to the Christian Science Monitor, other officials who have resigned include at least eight ambassadors and 13 lawmakers. President Saleh may have also lost the support of his own tribe. Finally, Al Jazeera’s report focuses on the situation in Sanaa (Sah - nah), as one of the army generals deployed his troops to to maintain stability and security there. “Tanks and troops have now been put into position around strategic locations in Sanaa to protect the protesters on the streets. The people have responded by handing the soldiers flowers. The next move is the president’s.” 'Like' Newsy on Facebook for updates in your news feed Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
22 Mar 2011
617
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2:45
BY EMOKE BEBIAK ANCHOR ALEX HOLLEY You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. The possibility of a Portuguese bailout was on top of the agenda at an EU summit on Thursday. Portugal will likely get a bailout for more than $100 billion after its government failed to implement austerity measures and fell as a consequence Wednesday night. Former Prime Minister Jose Socrates resisted asking for EU funding and resigned after all five opposition parties voted against spending cuts following public sentiment. The New York Times says regardless of what a future Portuguese government wants, the bailout is coming - the only question is, when? “With a rescue of Portugal seen now by most analysts as almost inevitable, the debate shifted Thursday to its likely timing — and whether any bailout would precede the formation of a new government in Lisbon following an expected general election in about two months.” Sky News reports the Portuguese bailout is troubling, because other countries might also refuse to reduce spending and could ask for EU funds. “The thing that’s noteworthy here is the way that Portugal ended up getting up to the point where it needs a bailout. Inside Portugal there was a popular revolt against the austerity measures that the EU said were needed. And that is fairly unpredictable.” But German Chancellor Angela Merkel says Portugal needs to take responsibility for its financial crisis. “Now everyone in positions of responsibility today in Portugal, all those who hold those positions tomorrow have to invest in the austerity program, so that market confidence increases.” (euronews) But the bailout is needed to save the euro, which most countries are dependent on. Also, World Politics Review points out Germany and other major European countries have no choice but to bail out Portugal for their own sake. “Banks in Germany and France are among the largest holders of existing debt for countries like Portugal, Spain, Italy and Ireland. If Portugal were to default on its existing debt, German and French banks would be near the top of the list of casualties from those defaults.” Surprisingly, the news of the bailout had barely any effect on the markets. An analyst for the Wall Street Journal explains, “Very few in the market think they will not get a rescue, and now we’re entering the game where they will get a rescue. And I think that’s one of the reasons that the euro and stock markets are largely taking this in stride.” The European Union has already bailed out Ireland and Greece. The LA Times wonders whether Portugal’s financial crisis is a precursor to more problems. “The bigger concern is that, if Portugal needs a bailout, investors may begin to bet that struggling Spain will follow. Spain is the world's 12th-largest economy.” But a blogger for The Huffington Post says the root of the problem is the European Union itself. “The problem with the ‘EU’ banner is that it links together economies that are quite different from each other. … Greece, Ireland and Portugal account for less than 5% of EU GDP. It is wise to remember that often overreaction offers the most profitable investment opportunities.” Follow Newsy On Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your feed. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
26 Mar 2011
795
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2:26
BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. A blow to the Gaddafi regime - Libyan Foreign Minister Moussa Koussa quit his post and defected to the U.K. Koussa reportedly says he’s “no longer willing” to work for embattled leader Moammar Gaddafi. As Sky News reports - the resignation makes Koussa the highest-ranking Libyan official to defect. “... A key figure in Gaddafi’s inner circle, very much the man that dragged this country back from the wilderness, back from its pariah state, the architect if you like, of the new moves to, in the post-sanction era of Libya, to make it part of the greater world again.” But the defection was not a surprise. International observers learned Monday he’d gone to Tunisia. That trip was publicly billed a “diplomatic mission” - but it nonetheless raised eyebrows at Al Jazeera. “We saw him recently at a press conference, talking about a potential ceasefire. And from his body language at that press conference it was obvious he wasn’t happy with what he was saying, and there was a lot of speculation at the time whether he was trying to find a way out. ... So all this speculation about whether high-ranking diplomats have been trying to get out of Libya have been growing over the last few days.” In the western press Koussa is widely billed as a reformer within the Libyan government. The Wall Street Journal looks at why. “[He] appears to have been a key person in Libya's policy to abandon its weapons of mass destruction programs, which led to the lifting of international sanctions against his homeland... He played a key role in reaching deals to compensate the victims of the Lockerbie bombing... removing one of the biggest obstacles to normalizing relations with the West.” So the man credited with normalizing relations with the outside world is out - and MSNBC focuses on what Koussa’s departure means for Libya. The New York Times’ David Sanger tells the network -- Koussa’s absence will be felt. DAVID SANGER: “...then that is the further isolation of Gadhafi, and also mean that Gadhafi doesn't have at hand something who the U.S. and others feel they can talk to.” Still - while the news is largely being billed as a blow to Gaddafi... CNN’s Ben Wedeman -- who’s been closely following the events in Libya unfold -- doesn’t think it’ll be a “critical loss” to the regime. Likewise - Reuters Africa says Koussa wasn’t in Gaddafi’s “innermost” circle - which the wire says is made up of family with more “robust” ties to the embattled leader. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for more Libya updates in your stream Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
5 Apr 2011
585
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2:14
BY JONATHAN KETZ ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy Hundreds of people held a kiss-in outside a pub in London---after its management allegedly kicked out a gay couple for kissing. Jonathan Williams and James Bull went out on their first date to the John Snow Pub in London. (Video from BBC) Jonathan: “We had been affectionate to the point our where hands were on the table. There wasn’t anything towards. We weren’t kissing with our tongues. We were kissing.” (Video from BBC) That’s when they say management asked them to leave. The couple says it was just an innocent kiss- but a customer at the pub that night tells BBC’s Alex Bushill, it was more than that. John: “They were all over each other. They were full-on blown kissing each other. They were passionately kissing each other...passionately, and they had their hands all over each other.” (Video from BBC) Full blown kissing or---just a little peck? The crowd outside the pub didn’t care. They held a kiss-in outside the business- staging a mass kiss at 7 o’clock Friday night. (Video from Sky News) Protesters say it was illegal for the pub to boot the smoochers. Sky News Laura Bundock explains the British law. Laura: “Landlords can of course ask drinkers to leave, but they must be mindful of equality laws, which say all customers gay or straight should be treated the same.” Pub managers say they first politely asked Williams and Bull to stop kissing and they did. But later on ---the two were lip-and-lip once again---that’s when the landlady asked them to leave. A blogger for The Independent says the couple should have gotten the picture after management’s first visit. “...there is no such universal right to snog...I wouldn't like to be asked by the landlord of a pub to stop snogging my husband, either. On the other hand, I probably wouldn't make a point of snogging my husband in a straight bar in any very intense way...” Williams-a financial journalist--wrote about his experience afterward in The Guardian. He says a lot of people are wondering why he didn’t just go to a gay bar. Here’s his answer: “...why should we limit ourselves to places that openly state their acceptance? Why should we not be allowed to kiss, as long as it is not indecent, anywhere we choose?” In all, the Daily Mail reports about 600 people showed up to the kiss-in. Protesters initially wanted to stage the kiss-a-thon inside the pub--- but once the pub got word of the protest--they kicked everybody out and closed early. Follow Newsy_Videos on Twitter Get more multisource world news analysis from Newsy Transcript by Newsy
19 Apr 2011
1349
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2:02
BY SAMUEL JOSEPH ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY You're watching multisource global video news analysis from Newsy. An unexpected new conflict -- reports indicate forces loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi spilled over into neighboring Tunisia in their efforts to chase rebels in the western border town of Dahiba. ANITA MCNAUGHT: “Things have taken an extraordinary turn at this crossing, Nick. We understand that not only have Gaddafi troops crossed over the border crossing into Tunisia, but they are now engaged in combat in the border town of Dehiba with Tunisian forces trying to stop them from advancing any further. Dahiba was captured by the rebels last week, prompting retaliation from loyalist forces and the fight that took them into another country -- but it wasn’t just soldiers crossing. Sky News says there was some firepower thrown over the line as well. ANCHOR: “Well, there was a very intensive attack by the Libyan government forces on this important border crossing at Dahiba. In which there were also some rounds, including mortar, three mortar rounds fired into Tunisian territory. Most likely by the Gaddafi forces. They were also using snipers across that border position at one point.” Tunisian military have captured fifteen vehicles from Gaddafi forces and experts say the border town of Dahiba is vital to the rebel cause. The Wall Street Journal calls it... “...a significant advance beyond their eastern Libyan strongholds that enabled them to bring in supplies by road through the Tunisian border... Loss of the crossing would sever the rebels' only paved road to the outside world.” And that isn’t its only importance -- The Christian Science Monitor says the rebel occupation of the town represents Gaddafi’s weakening control over the western side of the country. “...Qaddafi, who has mostly been focused on Misurata (Miz-raa-tah) for weeks, is now being drawn in other directions. While a few weeks ago Misurata was seen as a lone western holdout, its successful defiance of the government ... has inspired rebel gains elsewhere in the west.” According to Reuters soldiers loyal to Gaddafi have been returned over the border and the town is now firmly in the hands of the rebels. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
3 May 2011
368
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2:09
BY EMOKE BEBIAK ANCHOR JENNIFER MECKLES You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Families and friends of those lost in the crash of Air France flight 447are now reliving the pain that has been buried for nearly two years. “Search teams have retrieved a body from the wreckage of an Air France plane that crashed into the Atlantic in 2009. The remains still attached to the seat were recovered from a depth of about 12,000 feet and will be sent to a lab for DNA analysis.” (CNN) The plane was heading from Rio de Janeiro to Paris when it crashed in June 2009, claiming the lives of all 228 passengers. About 50 bodies were found after the crash, but the rest have been at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean for almost two years. But families have mixed feelings about recovering the bodies of their loved ones. The Guardian explains the difficulties saying: “The quest to recover bodies from the ocean is controversial among victims' families. Some fear it will further traumatise relatives, others are concerned about the state of the remains two years after the crash.” A man whose daughter and son-in-law were killed in the crash tells The Times: “I was not favourable ... The idea that they are manipulating these bodies tied to their seats... The ocean is their tomb, their destiny took them there.” But The Times also reports the president of a family support group in Brazil welcomes the efforts saying, "We will at last be able to bury them. We are going to reach a conclusion about what happened." The Telegraph reports it was the French court’s decision to retrieve the bodies “for the purposes of the investigation and to return them to families.” But according to France 24, the operation might not succeed. “The headquarters put out a statement saying that there are high uncertainties about the feasibility of continuing with this process. They will be trying over the next few days to raise more bodies, but they are emphasizing that this is a very difficult and unprecedented operation.” A spokesperson for the operation explains to Sky News: "It's difficult because the bodies are well preserved on the seabed with the pressure and the temperature, but bringing them up through warmer water causes decomposition.” The cause of the plane crash is still unsolved, but aviation officials are working on retrieving data from two black boxes found within the past five days. Follow Newsy on Twitter Newsy_Videos for updates in your feed. Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy. Transcript by Newsy.
7 May 2011
1234
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